newsId: 2DB01A3D-5056-AF26-BEB8C5E3F10E8A97
Title: Former US Ambassador to Israel to Deliver Perlmutter Lecture
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Abstract: Martin S. Indyk will deliver the Amos Perlmutter Memorial Lecture on Wednesday, April 1.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 03/23/2015
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Martin S. Indyk, former US Ambassador to Israel and Assistant Secretary of State for Near East Affairs, will deliver the Amos Perlmutter Memorial Lecture on Wednesday, April 1. Ambassador Indyk currently serves as executive vice president of the Brookings Institution and was founding director of the Saban Center for Middle Eastern Policy. From 2013-2014, he served as the Obama Administration’s US Special Envoy for Israeli-Palestinian negotiations. Both the Israeli prime minister and Palestinian Authority president supported his appointment.

Indyk’s lecture topic is “Order from Chaos: The Challenges of Restoring Order in the Middle East.” He detailed his first-hand account of Middle East peacemaking efforts during the Clinton administration in his book Innocent Abroad: An Intimate Account of American Peacemaking Diplomacy in the Middle East. Indyk has dedicated much of his professional career to this effort, noting in his book that the “journey has been a difficult and humbling one.” He has written often of the relationships among the broader disputes in the Middle East and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

This annual lecture is in memory of beloved American University School of Public Affairs Professor Amos Perlmutter, who taught at the University for nearly thirty years, until his death in 2001. Born in Poland, Perlmutter grew up in Palestine, fighting in the 1948, ’56, and ’73 wars for Israel. Later, he would cite that experience as foundational in shaping his character. He idolized Clark Gable as a child, but his role model in adulthood would be Ben-Gurion. He was a true public servant, scholar and public intellectual. The School of Public Affairs and the Center for Israel Studies are thrilled we can honor Professor Perlmutter’s contributions and memory through this lecture.

This public lecture will be hosted by the School of Public Affairs and the Center for Israel Studies. It begins at 7 PM in American University’s Butler Boardroom. Refreshments will be provided. The lecture is free. Please RSVP here.

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Title: CCPS Signs Historic Advisory Pact with OECD
Author: Lee Ivory
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Abstract: The Center for Congressional & Presidential Studies at SPA took a giant, and historic, step on the international government policy scene.
Topic: Government & Politics
Publication Date: 03/20/2015
Content:

The Center for Congressional & Presidential Studies (CCPS) at the School of Public Affairs (SPA) took a giant, and historic, step Wednesday on the international government policy scene.

Dr. James A. Thurber, distinguished professor at SPA and director of CCPS, facilitated an agreement between American University and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to advise on research that impacts lobbying, ethics and corruption around the world.

The memo of understanding, or MOU, is believed to be the first such agreement with a research university, according to Thurber, who nurtured the relationship with OECD through his years of work with CCPS, which he founded in 1979.

"I'm very pleased with this," Dr. Thurber said at the signing ceremony. "We are all very careful and we're all realistic about what this is, and think that's important.

"Hopefully, " he added, "this will turn into an extensive research collaboration...and, of course, (that includes) training and education on ethics, but also training about how to teach people about quality lobbying and advocacy."

Founded in 1961, the OECD is an international organization of 34 democratic countries—and more than 70 non-member countries—that's designed to stimulate economic progress and world trade. Located in Paris, the forum is recognized as a valuable source of policy analysis and internationally comparable statistical, economic and social data.

Thurber said the agreement with OECD "sort of built up over the years with (CCPS) getting a reputation about lobbying, training and research. I worked with Obama on lobbying reform directly when he was a senator; they knew about that. I worked with lobbying reform in Brussels (with the European Union); they know about that."

Dignitaries on hand for the special ceremony included AU Provost Scott Bass; U.S. Ambassador to OECD and former Rep. Connie Morella, R-Md.; William Danvers, deputy secretary-general of OECD; School of Public Affairs Dean Barbara Romzek; Candice Nelson, academic director of the Campaign Management Institute; and Pat Griffin, academic director of the Public Affairs and Advocacy Institute for CCPS and one of Thurber's main collaborators.

"We're looking forward to collaborating with Pat, Jim and the dean...and the provost on a range of issues but certainly the [MOU] we signed today, (which includes) working on lobbying and other issues of good governance," OECD’s Danvers said.

Bass said he especially was proud of the faculty and Dean Romzek for making the agreement possible.

"This is a partnership with one of the finest world organizations (that's) interested in a thoughtful approach to the topic of corruption (and) lobbying with appropriate communication...to clarify some of those rules in the world dialogue," he said.

Morella joked that it took a while for the agreement to materialize, but it was well worth the wait.

"I've often said, half kiddingly, that OECD could well have a mascot of a turtle," Morella said. "When I say that, people say, 'Oh, you're from Maryland; that's why...the Terps.' But the turtle moves slowly but gets to his destination. It has a hard shell and it sticks its neck out. And in many ways, OECD does that."

Romzek said the MOU better positions SPA in its plan to develop strategic partnerships.

"We're delighted to see this agreement come to fruition because it's part of our three-year plan to partner with capstone organizations globally. This agreement recognizes the important political work CCPS has done for years," she said. "Jim Thurber and his team do outstanding work and this is an opportunity for the world to share in that. We are extremely proud."

Under Thurber's direction, CCPS biannually has organized the Campaign Management Institute and the Public Affairs and Advocacy Institute over the past two decades. He also was the principal investigator of a seven-year grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts to study campaign conduct.

Thurber is the author of numerous books and more than 80 articles and chapters that range from congressional-presidential relations and congressional reform to ethics and campaigns/elections. His latest books: Rivals for Power (5th edition) and Campaigns and Elections American Style (4th edition).

Thurber often provides commentary on national TV and radio programs, including the Today Show, Good Morning America and National Public Radio.

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Title: SPA Students Publish Work with Prof. Johnson
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Abstract: Robert Johnson, professor of justice, law, and criminology, published three works with students from the School of Public Affairs that all uncover a fuller picture of those on death row.
Topic: Research
Publication Date: 03/04/2015
Content:

Over the past year, Robert Johnson, professor of justice, law, and criminology, published three works with students from the School of Public Affairs that all uncover a fuller picture of those on death row. The students and Johnson hope their work will help break down popular conceptions of death row inmates as evil, remorseless prisoners.

Johnson has often played a significant role as mentor for SPA students, co-writing publications with students fascinated by the topics he researches. His latest publications were co-authored by students of all levels, from undergraduate to doctoral programs.

Johnson’s research often sheds a light on policies relating to the death penalty, punishment, and confinement. He has provided expert testimony on these issues before state and federal courts, the U.S. Congress, and the European Commission of Human Rights. His courses at SPA have included Violence in Institutions, Violence in America, The Prison Community, Advanced Seminar in Corrections, and Corrections in America.

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Title: #SPA80for80: Muriel Bowser, SPA/MPP ’00
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Abstract: On November 4, 2014, SPA graduate Muriel Bowser was elected as the seventh, and only second female, mayor of the District of Columbia.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 03/02/2015
Content:

On November 4, 2014, SPA graduate Muriel Bowser was elected as the seventh, and only second female, mayor of the District of Columbia.

Bowser graduated from SPA in 2000 with a Master of Public Policy. A few years later, she began her career in local politics, serving in a seat on DC’s Advisory Neighborhood Council. In 2007, Bowser was elected War 4 Council member in a special election. She was re-elected in 2008, and again in 2012.

Throughout her career, Bowser says she has focused her attention on enhancing the lives of residents District-wide. She was selected by her colleagues on the Council as Chairwoman of the Committee on Economic Development and created more than 5,000 units of affordable housing, passed legislation to build a new soccer stadium and secured the best portion of the Walter Reed campus for DC. Previously, as Chairwoman of the Committee on Government Operations, Bowser worked with her colleagues to pass comprehensive ethics reform in the District, improved the safety and efficiency of the Metro system, and increased transparency in government contracting. As Chair of the Committee on Libraries, Parks and Recreation and the Committee on Public Services and Consumer Affairs, Muriel championed the causes of increasing the revenue generating potential of public spaces, curbed bullying in schools and recreation centers, and created consumer protections for homeowners facing foreclosure. As Chair of the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority (Metro) Board's Planning, Program, and Real Estate Committee, Muriel led the adoption of comprehensive revisions to joint development policies that promote more transparency, competition, higher quality transit oriented development, and include Metro’s first ever affordable housing policy. She also previously served as Chair of the regional Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments’ Transportation Planning Board.

She has been awarded the Democratic State Committee’s Legislator of the Year Award (2012), the Phyllis Campbell Newsome Public Policy Leadership Award (2012), the NoMa Business Improvement District Public Sector Award (2012) and the Alice Paul Award (2014) from the School of Public Affairs’ Women & Politics Institute.

Bowser, a native Washingtonian, earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in History from Chatham College and a Master’s degree in Public Policy from American University.

#MySPAHistory

“I learned great deal about using quantitative analysis to get better results in government.”

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Title: Prof. Hardy Recognized by National Economic Association
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Abstract: The assistant professor of public administration and policy was awarded the NEA President's Award in recognition of his exemplary service towards the organization.
Topic: Achievements
Publication Date: 02/27/2015
Content:

Bradley Hardy, assistant professor of public administration and policy, received the National Economic Association (NEA) President’s Award in recognition of his exemplary service towards the organization. The award was presented to Hardy during the annual 2015 Allied Social Sciences Association meeting, held in Boston, MA.

NEA’s outgoing president, Trevon D. Logan, wrote to Hardy expressing his gratitude and admiration for the professor’s dedication and hard work for NEA. “It was a pleasure to award you a 2015 President’s Award,” he wrote.

Hardy’s work with NEA dovetails with his research at the School of Public Affairs, where he examines trends and sources of income volatility and intergenerational mobility within the United States, with a focus on socio-economically disadvantaged families. During NEA’s 2014 meeting, Hardy organized and chaired a paper session entitled, “Public Policies Impacting Low-Income & Minority Communities,” which presented four pieces of scholarship studying several issues, including the changing safety net for low-income families, and factors involved in the transition in and out of poverty.

Founded in 1969, NEA began its mission as the Caucus of Black Economists, promoting the professional lives of minorities within the economic profession. The organization has continued to grow in both mission and scope, producing and distributing knowledge of economic issues that are of exceptional interest to promoting economic growth among native and immigrant African Americans, Latinos, and other people of color.

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Title: William K. Reilly Environmental Leadership Award Winners Announced
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Abstract: CEP is pleased to announce that Ben Grumbles, Maryland Secretary of Environment, and Fred Krupp, President of the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), will receive the 2015 William K. Reilly Environmental Leadership Awards.
Topic: Achievements
Publication Date: 02/25/2015
Content:

The Center for Environmental Policy is pleased to announce that Ben Grumbles, Maryland Secretary of Environment, and Fred Krupp, President of the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), will receive the 2015 William K. Reilly Environmental Leadership Awards. The William K. Reilly Awards recognize individuals in environmental careers in the public and non-profit/private sectors who demonstrate qualities of leadership, innovation, engagement of diverse interests, effective problem solving and contributions to future generations of environmental leaders. These awards, named in honor of one of the most respected leaders in U.S. environmental policy, will be given at a ceremony to be held at American University on March 26, 2015.

Ben Grumbles has had a long and distinguished career in water and environmental policy, serving the public and teaching law students and environmental professionals for more than 25 years. Prior to being appointed by Maryland Governor Larry Hogan as Secretary of Environment in December 2014, Grumbles served as President of the US Water Alliance, a not-for-profit educational organization committed to uniting people and policies for water sustainability throughout the country. Previously, Grumbles led Arizona’s Department of Environmental Quality working on air quality and climate change, energy policy and waste management, water efficiency, and wastewater recycling. Grumbles served as Assistant Administrator for Water at US EPA from 2004 through 2008 during which launched EPA’s water efficiency labeling program, WaterSense, and initiatives on green infrastructure, water and climate change, and pharmaceuticals.

Mr. Grumbles serves on various boards and committees, including the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Academy of Sciences; Solutions from the Land, an educational nonprofit forging integrated and sustainable policies for agriculture, forestry, and conservation in the U.S. and globally; and the Water Resources Adaption to Climate Change Workgroup of the Federal Advisory Committee on Water Information. He is also a former board member and current supporter of River of Words, a national nonprofit committed to connecting kids to their watersheds and imaginations through poetry and art.

Fred Krupp has led EDF for three decades and is a widely recognized leader of the international environmental community as well as an influential voice on climate change, energy, and sustainability issues. He is a champion of harnessing the power of the marketplace to protect our environment. Krupp is co-author with Miriam Horn of the New York Times bestseller Earth: The Sequel – The Race to Reinvent Energy and Stop Global Warming.

Under Krupp's leadership, EDF has become one of the world's largest and most influential environmental organizations. Among the group's many achievements, EDF is the architect of the federal market-based acid rain policy that has reduced average U.S. air concentrations of sulfur dioxide by 76% since 1990. In 2011, serving on U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu's advisory panel for shale gas production, Krupp was a powerful voice for strong regulation and enforcement to protect local communities from air and water pollution caused by natural gas development. He has focused national attention on the problem of methane emissions – methane is a potent greenhouse gas – from the oil-and-gas system. Krupp has also led EDF's innovative corporate partnerships with FedEx, KKR, McDonald's, Walmart and others.

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Title: A Night of Firsts
Author: Gregg Sangillo
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Abstract: Laura Bush will receive the Wonk of the Year award at Bender Arena.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 02/23/2015
Content:

American University has made it official: The next Wonk of the Year award will be presented to former First Lady Laura Bush. She'll be the third person to receive this honor, joining former President Bill Clinton and CNN journalist Anderson Cooper. She will accept the award and deliver remarks at AU on Wednesday, April 8 in Bender Arena. The event is hosted by Kennedy Political Union, the student-run lecture series on campus.

A Record of Creating Change

Since its founding in 1968, KPU has brought a number of leaders and dignitaries to AU. But it has never before hosted a current or former First Lady.

KPU Director Tyler Bowders says Mrs. Bush was selected as Wonk of the Year because of her work to create meaningful change in the world. She's smart, passionate, focused, and engaged, and her record should resonate with the AU community, he says.

"Mrs. Bush's global outreach in addressing issues such as literacy, women's education, and combating HIV/AIDS in Africa, and her domestic commitments to women's health, span before, during, and after her role as First Lady of the United States," Bowders says.

"Like Clinton and Cooper, Mrs. Bush has been an eyewitness to major historical events in recent American history and has used her influence to enact both domestic and global change," he adds.

Passionate and Committed

Bush has championed education and literacy, co-founding the National Book Festival in Washington, D.C. She has a passion for international human rights issues, a mission she's continued to champion through the work of the George W. Bush Institute.

Bush is currently Chair of the Women's Initiative at the Bush Institute in Dallas. In that role, Mrs. Bush oversees three signature programs: the Afghan Women's Project, which highlights the struggles and successes of Afghan women; the First Ladies Initiative, which supports First Ladies in Africa—and beyond—in their efforts to foster change; and the Women's Initiative Fellowship Program for rising female leaders in the Middle East and North Africa.

Just recently, Rula Ghani, the First Lady of Afghanistan, visited Dallas and praised Mrs. Bush. "Once committed to a cause, she's relentless, she's resourceful, and she does it so gracefully, and so unobtrusively, that you don't realize her power until faced with her achievements," said Ghani, according to press reports.

Anita McBride, an executive-in-residence at American University's School of Public Affairs, was Mrs. Bush's chief of staff in the White House from 2005-2009. McBride explains how AU, as an institution, devotes resources to examine the legacies of the nation's First Ladies. "It is fitting that we're recognizing one of the most active First Ladies in our history," she says. "And she has remained deeply invested, passionate, and committed to issues she was engaged in during public life."

Above the Fray

Laura Bush was born in Midland, Texas. She earned her bachelor's degree in education from Southern Methodist University and a master's degree in library science from the University of Texas at Austin. She's worked in public schools as both a teacher and a librarian. She married George W. Bush in 1977, and gave birth to twin daughters, Barbara and Jenna, in 1981. In April 2013, they welcomed granddaughter Mila Hager, daughter of Henry and Jenna Hager.

McBride offers reasons why Bush was admired as First Lady. "Laura Bush is a very solid human being—very grounded," she says. "She never turned up the heated political rhetoric of the time. If anything, she helped to diffuse it by her calm demeanor."

Her love of literature and books, McBride says, made her an effective communicator. "She has a beautiful way of using language. When she speaks, it means something," McBride states.

McBride places her position in historical context, explaining the multi-faceted role of First Ladies in American democracy. "I think one way where First Ladies are unique in this is that they have an ability to rise above the political fray, and bring a human side to our politics. And really help remind Americans that our political leaders, no matter who they are, generally get into this because they want to do something good."

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Title: JLC Professor Lynn Addington Hosts Conference on Complex Crime Datasets
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Abstract: On February 5-6, Associate Professor Lynn Addington hosted a conference of scholars and practitioners to discuss the challenges of working with complex crime datasets.
Topic: Research
Publication Date: 02/20/2015
Content:

Big data is a unique challenge for 21st century law practitioners. The incredible amount of information collected may be a boon for enforcement agencies, but it also presents a great task unraveling the research and logistical difficulties involved in analyzing so much information.

On February 5-6, 2015, Lynn Addington, associate professor of justice, law, and criminology, hosted a conference with funding from SPA Dean Barbara Romzek. The conference brought together a group of scholars and practitioners to discuss the challenges of working with complex crime datasets. Entitled “Best Practices for Working with NIBRS Data,” the conference focused on analyzing the police-generated crime data collected within the National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS). NIBRS is collected as part of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reports. Here local and state police departments submit detailed information regarding crime incidents as well as the victims, offenders, and arrestees. The most recent years of NIBRS data include over 5 million cases. Given the amount of information available, researcher and practitioner interest in using NIBRS data is growing. This interest as well as a related need to help support efforts to effectively use NIBRS data motivated the conference and the papers.

Participants from across the country joined Addington as they presented working papers that discussed innovative ways to capitalize on the NIBRS data, but also identified potential pitfalls for researchers as they delve into the massive dataset. Conference participants included a diverse mix of professionals from academia, the FBI, state police, and the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Their discussion also included ways to connect the research community with practitioners and policymakers.

The papers presented at the conference are scheduled for publication in a special issue of Justice Research and Policy concerning “Innovative Uses of NIBRS to Inform Policy” as well as an online user’s guide as part of a partnership with the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data.

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Title: Founders Day Ball Marks AU History & Pride, Friendship
Author: Patrick Bradley
Subtitle:
Abstract: Senior Chandler Thornton co-plans a gala that traces back more than a century.
Topic: Student Life
Publication Date: 02/20/2015
Content:

Century-Plus of Pride

Four years ago, then-freshman Chandler Thornton stood among the crowd of students gathered beneath the marble arched ceilings and stained glass windows of the Library of Congress. Dressed in formal wear, he and the hundreds of others listened to AU President Dr. Neil Kerwin speak on the history of American University.

It was Thornton’s first Founders Day Ball.

“That was my first time really hearing the president of our university talk about the history of the founding,” he recalled. “I look back on it fondly. That year was very special for me, developing an appreciation for the history of our institution, feeling very proud to be an AU student.”

Now a senior in the School of Public Affairs, Thornton has carried that pride into his current position as co-director of Founders Day planning alongside his best friend and former Student Government president Pat Kelly. Together, the two have organized the university’s largest ball yet to honor the university’s founding by an Act of Congress more than a century ago.

The Saturday, February 21, event takes place—for the first time—at the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum, where it will host a sold-out crowd of 2,000 students.

For the former Kennedy Political Union director Thornton, the occasion offers a lot to celebrate.

“Just being founded by an Act of Congress is something that AU students should take pride in,” he said. “AU does have a very special history, and we do train students to become future leaders, whether they’re serving in Congress or as public servants back in their hometowns.”

From Pageants to DJs

The AU community has celebrated the university’s founding in a number of ways since February 21, 1931, when it first recognized the 40th anniversary of AU’s incorporation by the District of Columbia in 1891. Still, the date actually notes February 24, 1893, when U.S. President Benjamin Harrison signed into law the university’s existence.

That first event included a banquet, and students from the Women’s Guild held a pageant reenacting the events that led to the founding, with oratories by student actors playing presidents who visited campus. They also reenacted the university turning campus over to the military for the training of more than 100,000 soldiers during World War I.

Since then, Founders Day festivities have alternated between similar pageants and more formal events under the name of Charter Day, featuring processions, speeches, and even the 1946 dedication of carillon bells that would chime from the attic of Hurst Hall.

The modern, student-driven Founders Day Ball appeared in the 1990s, as the then-named Student Confederation held a gala at the Old Post Office Pavilion in 1995. In more recent years, students have staged the ball at locations including the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery and American History Museum.

Thornton sees the venues as particularly important both to the spirit of the event and to the university’s connection to its home in the District.

“This university really has a woven history with public service, and the Founders Day Ball is a tribute to that public service,” he said. “It’s a tribute to our place here in Washington, D.C., and to the history that we have.”

Personal History

For Thornton, the event may certainly be steeped in tradition and history, but he’s also enjoying the planning and organization of it for another reason—friendship. Since meeting in Student Government freshman year, he and Kelly have gone on to become fraternity brothers, roommates, and now seniors graduating toward diverging paths.

He hopes that—gathered together among the artifacts of U.S. space and aviation history—students will hear Dr. Kerwin speak, dance, and share in moments that will shape their own piece of AU’s history, just as he did his freshman year and just as he’s done now in leading the event with his best friend.

“The goal is to have a very memorable night, where people will be able to look back on their college experience and say, ‘What are some memories I have of college?’ One of them should be Founders Day Ball,” he said. “I’m pretty confident that will happen.”

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Title: Mock Trial Teams Advance to Opening Round of National Championships
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Abstract: Teams A and B are on their way to the opening round of the Mock Trial National Championships following a successful set of performances at the regional tournaments.
Topic: Achievements
Publication Date: 02/18/2015
Content:

Two of AU’s Mock Trial teams are on their way to the opening round of the Mock Trial National Championships following a successful set of performances at the regional tournaments.

Team A placed first at the Richmond Regional tournament, while Team B finished in 8th place at the Pittsburgh Regional tournament. Each team earned a spot in the American Mock Trial Association’s (AMTA) Opening Round Championship Series (ORCS), which will be held throughout March in eight different host cities around the country, including Washington, DC. In addition to the Team A and Team B victories, three members of American University’s Mock Trial teams earned distinct recognition throughout the regional tournaments. Team A’s Jenna Forster took home an outstanding attorney award, while Team C’s Jake Kern and Sam Murphy won an outstanding attorney and outstanding witness award, respectively.

Team A’s members are Forster, Melisa Azak, Iain Phillips, Virginia Lyon, and Bobby McCabe, who are led by captains Kristen Pulkstenis and Jordyn Giannone, Team B’s members are Jenny Newman, Eliana Peck, Ashwini Velchamy, Areta Jez, Nick Haley, and Jon Kaufmann, and are led by captains Ashley Dimuzio and Jes Cianci.

AU Mock Trial Team B

AU Mock Trial Team B

The top six teams in each ORCS tournament will move on to the AMTA’s National Championship Tournament, to be held in Cincinnati, Ohio, from April 17-19, 2015.

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Title: SPA Alumna Makes Career Move to University of California, Berkeley
Author: Kristena Wright
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Abstract: Rosemarie Rae, SPA/MPA ‘09, joins the higher education field after more than 30 years in the non-profit sector.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 03/11/2015
Content:

Rosemarie Rae, SPA/MPA '09, was recently named associate vice chancellor of finance and chief financial officer at the University of California, Berkeley. As a graduate of AU's public administration and Key Executive Leadership programs in 2009, Rosemarie actually started her graduate work late in her career. "I was in my mid-forties when I joined cohort 36. It was career- and life-changing. But I do contribute the experience I had at American University as a direct link to where I am now," she says.

Coming up on her one-year anniversary at UC Berkeley, Rosemarie actually spent the last 15 to 20 years in the nonprofit sector. "I used a lot of my research experience from my cohort," she says. "So many of the things I learned have really proven to be cornerstones of what guides my work today. I spend most of my time at Berkley in strategic conversation, and I really learned the art of strategic thinking from professor Robert Tobias, director of business development for the key executive leadership program, and other AU professors," Rosemarie adds.

Rosemarie shares that most of her current work is related to finance. Her undergraduate degree is in accounting;she sat for CPA exam and passed, and this has helped her tremendously over the years. However, the brunt of her work focuses on the alignment with other C-level executives at Berkeley and how they think about resource allocations. Additionally, they spend a vast amount of time figuring out the best use of their limited resources and how it supports the institution's strategic vision. 

Prior to beginning at Berkeley, Rosemarie served as the chief financial and administrative officer of The National Trust for Historic Preservation as well as executive vice president, chief strategy officer, and CFO at Volunteers of America. Berkeley is her first job in higher education. She says, "My nonprofit experience was similar in nature to higher education, so I felt well prepared."

Before her career change, Rosemarie went back to graduate school at AU for herself. She says, "I'm originally from the east coast, and I was eager to be in an academic setting and have an opportunity to learn and explore new ideas. It was far more rewarding than I ever thought it would be."

Her advice to students is the same advice she gives now as an administrator: "You have to realize that people really do want to help you. Whether it be your professors or your peers, tap into the resources that are offered to you. Mentorship is a great thing, professors are great, but think beyond the professor to someone who is in your field. Build your career by taking an interest in a range of things that will be helpful for career advancement," she says.

Her final thought for students, "Take a leadership role every chance you get, you'll need to strengthen that muscle if you want to be in a place of power in your future."

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Title: SPA Alumnus Takes Student Leadership to the National Level
Author: Karli Kloss, SIS/MA '15
Subtitle:
Abstract: The National Campus Leadership Council connects student policymakers across the country.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 02/13/2015
Content:

From AU Student Government president to executive director and cofounder of the National Campus Leadership Council, Andy MacCracken, SPA/BA ’11, SPA/MA ’14, has shown a deep commitment to addressing the most pressing concerns facing this generation’s college students. 

At NCLC, Andy and his staff empower student body presidents and their teams to collaborate and tackle major issues like sexual assault, student load debt, student veterans’ affairs, and access to mental health services. NCLC connects these groups to other campuses, policymakers, and the media while providing technical assistance and professional skills trainings to ensure they are effectively lobbying for change. 

Right now, NCLC is running campus outreach for the White House’s “It’s On Us” campaign to stop campus sexual assaults. Working with approximately 300 campuses, NCLC’s role is to support the work students are already doing around education and prevention. 

Speaking of the White House, last year Andy had the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to introduce President Obama ahead of the president’s remarks about executive actions that would support federal student loan borrowers. He also visited the White House as a panelist for the “It’s On Us” campaign. 

Andy served as AU’s Student Government president during his junior year. Following, he was involved with different efforts to facilitate greater collaboration among student leaders regionally and nationally. As some of those efforts began to merge into each other, Andy decided it was time to turn this side project into a full-time career.  

“A lot of what I learned in the SPA Leadership Program, Campaign Management Institute, and Public Affairs Advocacy Institute shaped my approach to starting my organization. Each of those programs are top notch in developing critical thinking and mission-focused strategy on top of hands-on experience,” Andy says. 

NCLC’s role in the higher education community continues to grow, as it hosts national student leader summits in collaboration with the White House. Students today face many issues, from employment gaps to soaring student debt, and Andy says NCLC is committed to opening dialogue and access between student leaders and policymakers. 

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Title: The Next Generation of Leaders: Sarah McBride’s Pride for AU
Author: Megan Patterson, SIS/BA ’11
Subtitle:
Abstract: Sarah McBride, SPA/BA ’13, says that her time at AU allowed her to live authentically.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 06/10/2014
Content:

Alumna Sarah McBride, SPA/BA '13, is proud that American University is preparing the next generation of leaders. At 23 years old, the former Student Government president is a remarkable example of what AU's young alumni can achieve. From being the first openly transgender woman to work for the White House, to being instrumental in the passage of Delaware's Gender Identity Nondiscrimination Act, Sarah is committed to working toward equality for all. 

Sarah has loved politics since she was a teenager, and she became actively involved in campaigns in her home state of Delaware in 2006. Coming to AU was the right choice for her politically-minded career, she says, because her time at AU "made my love of politics less about 'politics' and more about what politics can do." 

As president of AU's Student Government for the 2011-12 academic year, Sarah championed student interests, including gender neutral housing and encouraging changes in AU's insurance coverage for transgender students. After completing her term as president, Sarah wrote a Facebook note, later edited into an op-ed in The Eagle, titled "The Real Me," in which she came out as being a transgender woman. 

After publishing her story, Sarah received a tremendous amount of support from the AU community. "Only at AU would I have had an experience where every single response to my coming out was positive," she says. "I wouldn't be the person I am today without AU and without my experience there. My time at AU, the relationships I developed, and the lessons I learned allowed me to live authentically." 

Sarah says she felt overwhelmed, but also inspired by the reactions she received by the AU community. "It shows us where our school can be, where our community can be, where our country can be, and that we have the capacity to get there." 

Sarah credits fellow AU students and alumni for instilling in her "a deep passion for social justice." Now an alumna, Sarah has continued to work with the university in promoting equality among students. Along with the Center for Diversity and Inclusion, Sarah helped champion a new sexuality and queer studies minor at AU, which debuted in fall 2013. 

She says that she feels a "deep responsibility" to give back to the school that has given her so much. "I want to make sure that the students who go to American for generations to come have as positive an experience as I had. I and my fellow alumni have a responsibility to do that." 

Sarah knows that the university has well prepared the next generation of leaders, saying, "If America was a little more like American, things would be a lot better for people who are currently struggling."

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Title: Business & Public Affairs: A Perfect Marriage
Author: Phil Recchio
Subtitle:
Abstract: Ben, Kogod/MBA ’11, and Christina Macfarland, SPA/MPA ’11, entrepreneurially apply their skills in South Florida, while giving back to AU.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 05/15/2014
Content:

Ben, Kogod/MBA ’11, and Christina Macfarland, SPA/MPA ’11, came to AU together, shortly after getting married in their native state of Florida, to pursue their individual academic and professional interests. Christina’s passion for nonprofit work and supporting her community led her to pursue a Master of Public Administration and,a graduate certificate in nonprofit management, whereas Ben built off his undergrad business degree by focusing his MBA studies on real estate and finance. Since graduation, they have returned to their home state to not only put their degrees to work, but also spread word of AU’s excellence while galvanizing the Florida alumni community. 

This past February, Christina and Ben hosted more than 60 AU alumni, parents, and friends in their Palm Beach home, and had the chance to catch up with their old neighbor, Vice President of Alumni Relations and Development, Dr. Thomas J. Minar. Before Dr. Minar delivered updates regarding campus plans and alumni initiatives within the South Florida community, Christina reminisced about her time working in the AU development department for corporate and foundation giving, and Ben remembered hunkering down in their condo during the infamous Snow-maggedon storm of 2010. 

These types of close relationships serve as a beautiful model for how the Office of Alumni Relations and Development seeks to engage AU alumni, and Christina and Ben are no strangers to the world of philanthropy and volunteering. Christina is a board member for the Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties, where fellow master’s alumna Jillian Vukusich, CAS/MA ’04, serves as vice president for community investment.  

Christina continues her educational pursuits, and is a recent graduate of "Leadership Palm Beach County," which kept her up to date on the latest trends in philanthropic and non profit leadership. This is especially important for those as involved in their communities as she is. She volunteers and has served on numerous committees for The Flagler Museum, March of Dimes, Historical Society of Palm Beach County, the Ryan Licht Sang Bipolar Foundation, and the Association of Fundraising Professionals. Presently, Christina performs research and writing for Women Corporate Directors, the only global membership organization of women corporate directors which serves as a catalyst for thought leadership and networking.

In addition to serving on his high school’s alumni board and helping to recruit great students to AU, Ben founded a local publication, Palm Beach Philanthropy, to showcase and educate the public to the diverse causes being supported right in their backyard. While philanthropy has always been a passion and a practice for the Macfarlands, Ben also puts his MBA to work running a boutique asset management firm that focuses on investing family office and institutional capital into self storage, student housing, and other special situations in real estate. The firm, where Ben serves as a partner and chief investment officer, has successfully acquired over two million square feet of real estate in the last two years.

The Macfarlands' collective energy and productivity is even more impressive in light of the fact they’ve accomplished so much all while raising their blossoming family. While their two young girls are a handful at home, Ben and Christina have a long standing history of supporting each other through thick and thin. While on campus, they could be seen attending a kick-off event to help rally support for Christina’s successful run for Editor-in-Chief of the SPA journal The Public Purpose, and nowadays they work to balance their busy schedules of business and board meetings with family meals and outings. 

Thankfully, the Macfarlands have continued their tradition of support as alumni by hosting the recent event for the South Florida AU Eagle community. As for the beautiful marriage of Ben’s business degree and Christina’s nonprofit policy focus, its power can be encapsulated by an Arthur Fried quote: “Private philanthropy is the last frontier of unconstrained freedom for private action in the public good.” AU is lucky to count this entrepreneurial and philanthropically minded young couple among its alumni family.

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Title: Board Member Amy Jones Realized Her Dream of Working on the Hill
Author: Rebecca Vander Linde
Subtitle:
Abstract: After getting two AU degrees, Amy has her dream job overseeing the House’s education policies.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 05/15/2014
Content:

“I am slightly unusual among many of my friends in that I am doing exactly what I’ve wanted to do since sixth grade,” says Alumni Board member Amy Jones, SPA/BA ’99, WCL/JD ’03. Her sixth grade social studies teacher and a family trip to Washington, D.C. convinced a young Amy that she wanted to work on Capitol Hill one day. “I came to AU for college and law school because I felt it was the best place to study that would expose me to politics and Capitol Hill,” she says.

After earning both her bachelor’s and law degrees from AU, Amy’s dreams came true, and she landed a job on the Hill. She now serves as director for education and human services policy for the majority staff on the Committee on Education and the Workforce in the U.S. House of Representatives. In this role, she oversees the House’s education policies.

Amy says the most rewarding part of her job is knowing that “the policies we are pursuing will help others, particularly the underserved, be able to access and achieve their postsecondary [education] goals,” adding, “I love the energy and the quick pace on Capitol Hill. There is always something interesting happening.”

A visit to campus on Accepted Students Day convinced Amy that AU was the right choice for her. “AU was close enough to the city that I knew there would be a lot of different things to do and see, but it also had the benefit of having a more enclosed campus, which I really liked,” she says. “And I liked my undergraduate experience so much, that I went to WCL for law school.”

As an AU student, Amy was involved in numerous activities. “I participated in the Freshmen Service Experience, played lacrosse during my freshman and sophomore years, worked at the front desk of McDowell Hall, studied abroad in London for one semester, interned on Capitol Hill, and worked at a few different law firms because I was trying to decide if I wanted to go to law school,” Amy recalls.

Of her time on the American University Alumni Board, Amy says, “I have thoroughly enjoyed my service on the AU Alumni Board and becoming a more engaged alumna over the past several years. I am continually amazed by the students attending AU now and love being able to serve as a mentor or resource to them.”

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Title: Alumni Board Member Joe Vidulich is Always an Eagle
Author: Rebecca Vander Linde
Subtitle:
Abstract: Few alumni embody the phrase “Once an Eagle, Always an Eagle” as well as Joe Vidulich, SPA/BA ’08.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 04/07/2014
Content:

Few alumni embody the phrase "Once an Eagle, Always an Eagle" as well as Joe Vidulich, SPA/BA '08. A member of the American University Alumni Board and men's basketball season ticket holder, Joe continues to support AU as enthusiastically as when he was a student.

"I joined the alumni board because I want to make sure the AU alumni experience is just as good as – if not better than – the student experience, and show alumni that their time at AU doesn't end after four years," Joe says, and it's true: his Eagle pride is inescapable and infectious.

An AU men's basketball jersey bearing the signatures of the 2008 team (the first in AU history to qualify for the NCAA tournament) hangs on the wall of his home, and he is frequently at basketball games and alumni events. Joe even traveled to Boston and Milwaukee this year to watch the men's basketball team win the Patriot League Championship and play in the NCAA tournament, respectively.

"During the Patriot League Championship game, [Boston University's Agganis Arena] arena became Bender Arena North," Joe recalls. "You could hear the cheers of the AU students and alumni throughout the building and on television. It just shows that AU alumni are everywhere, and AU pride far exceeds the boundaries of Washington, D.C. … The fact that this small team of stellar student-athletes achieved an objective no one thought they could speaks to the caliber of the team, Coach Mike Brennan, and Athletics Director Billy Walker. I'm so proud of them, and I look forward to next season."

As a high school student in Long Island, Joe knew he wanted to study politics and policy. He looked at a number of D.C. schools, but decided to apply early decision to AU because, he says, "I fell in love with the campus and the spirit of the community. I saw that AU really believed that given the tools and the knowledge, you can change the world."

As soon as he arrived on campus, Joe began to change the world – or at least AU. As a freshman, he ran for student government and later became student body president. He also joined College Republicans, the Residence Hall Association, ATV, was a resident assistant, and even participated in a production of the Rocky Horror Picture Show. Joe also interned for Congressman Peter King (R-NY) and the McCain presidential campaign. "I wanted the whole AU experience," Joe says, "And I definitely achieved that."

Perhaps Joe's most lasting legacy to date is as a founder of Blue Crew, the student cheering section at athletics events. After noticing lackluster attendance at AU games, Joe wanted to bolster student support for AU athletes. "It touched me that these young men and women were out there – on a court or turf or field – every day with an AU emblem on their chests that represented me and everything that I stood for. … We [as AU students] might have disagreements on policy or philosophy, but there shouldn't be a disagreement about cheering on fellow students as they represent your university in competition," he says.

Joe regularly interacts with AU President Neil Kerwin, SPA/BA '71, in his duties as an alumni board member, and he recalls Dr. Kerwin's inauguration fondly. As student body president, he participated in the inauguration ceremony, presenting Dr. Kerwin with an AU jersey on behalf of the student body. "It was a really special time. His presidency brought about a rebirth in the AU alumni community, since he is the first AU president who is also an alumnus and he has implemented a strategic plan that incorporates alumni."

When he isn't cheering for the Eagles or networking with fellow alumni, Joe represents the interests of over 650 businesses and half a million employees as vice president of government relations for the Fairfax County Chamber of Commerce, one of largest chambers in Virginia.

"One of the passions I got out of AU is that a strong economy is central to a strong region. … Every day, I use the skills taught to me by some of the best professors and experts in their fields to advocate and shape policy to make a better Virginia for my companies and the people who work for those companies," Joe says.

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Title: John Tranfaglia, SPA/BA ’13, Providing Solutions to Preserve the Maine Lobster Industry
Author: Pat Rabb
Subtitle:
Abstract: As part of AU’s Roosevelt Institute, Tranfaglia began proposing ideas to strengthen the industry.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 01/07/2014
Content:

"I think the biggest mistake that the lobster industry has made is not being proactive towards marketing the product out of state."

So says alumnus John Tranfaglia, SPA/BA ’13, about his efforts to promote initiatives to save Maine’s most identifiable industry - lobsters. Without changes, many believe that the business of catching lobsters in the state of Maine will die.

John first became involved in the lobster issue as a member of the Roosevelt Institute at American University. As a member of this organization, he was challenged to look at public policy problems and highlight possible solutions that might alleviate them. "I had read in the newspaper a few times about some of the troubles that the lobster industry was having with marketing the product and thought it would be interesting to look into the issue further," says John.

The Roosevelt Institute is the first student-run policy organization or "think tank" in the United States. Its mission is to empower students to create and advocate their ideas for change. Including the AU chapter, there are 8,500 active members and over 80 established chapters in the U.S. and abroad.

John describes how, until recently, there were very few processing plants in Maine to break down and freeze the product so that items such as lobster meat or tails could be sold.  Much of the lobster caught off the coast of Maine is sent to Canada to be processed. Once it crosses the border, it is marketed as Canadian lobster. This leads to price markups that increase dealers’ profits while shrinking the profits of the lobstermen.

Once caught, a lobster can change hands five or six times before reaching the consumer’s plate. However, lobstermen are getting paid as little as $2 a pound for their catch – while the price can escalate to $18 a pound by the time it reaches a restaurant menu. 

John believes that the best way to raise profits for the Maine lobstermen would be to increase processing capabilities in Maine. "Last year, over 133 million pounds of lobster was caught off the Maine coast but much of that was sent to Canada for processing," he adds. John thinks that if either the processing costs could be reduced or if lobstermen could co-op with processors, then their wages would increase considerably.

When reflecting on his passion for the Maine lobster industry, John admits that he actually was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan. However, his family moved to Cape Elizabeth, Maine, when he was two years old. "I have lived there ever since and it is what I have come to know as home," he says.

In describing why he chose to attend AU, John states that he wanted to go to a school in the city, he wanted to be able to study and work in politics, and he wanted the opportunity to study abroad. "Going to AU allowed me to achieve all three of these," he remarks.

Now that John has graduated from AU with a major in political science and a minor in public administration and policy, he plans to leave Maine and move overseas. "In March, I will be moving to Seoul, South Korea, to teach English for a year," he says.

While in Korea, John will be planning his next step. He has an interest in health policy and has deferred his admission to the University of Melbourne for a master’s degree in public health. "Studying abroad was something that has definitely impacted me throughout my time at AU. I loved Perth and plan on going back to Australia for graduate studies," says John.

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Title: Cameron McCosh, SPA/BA ’07, SPA/MPP ’08, is a Washington Power Broker
Author: Dash Radosti
Subtitle:
Abstract: McCosh recently was named to list of 25 Most Influential Washington Women Under 35.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 11/12/2013
Content:

Cameron McCosh, SPA/BA ’07, SPA/MPP ’08, was recently named to the National Journal’s list of 25 Most Influential Washington Women under 35.

Although only 28, Cameron is chief operating officer of American Action Forum, a conservative think-tank focused on domestic and economic policy.

After finishing her studies at American University with both an undergraduate degree in justice and a master’s in public policy, Cameron interned with Lehman Brothers, working in government relations. Afterwards, John McCain's Chief Economic Policy Adviser approached Cameron about starting a new type of conservative think-tank that would be more reactive to the 24-hour news cycle. The rest, as they say, is history.

In a few short years, Cameron helped grow the organization from a fledgling startup to one of Washington’s most influential center-right policy institutes. As COO, she is involved in nearly all aspects of the organization--from formulating policy to meeting decision makers on the Hill and advancing the forum’s message. Cameron credits her time at AU as being instrumental to her development.

“When I came to AU, I didn’t know what I wanted to do but I knew I loved to learn. Then I took a class from Dr. Jeffery Schaler that really questioned what I believed in, changed my outlook and sparked my interest in public policy,” says Cameron. Later, as a graduate student, another professor, Dr. Sonja Walti, really showed her how public policy influences lives all around us. “Her class really opened my eyes,” Cameron recalls.

While she is unsure about the future (she jokes that she barely has tomorrow planned), Cameron is confident that she’ll be able to seize whatever opportunity presents itself—another skill she credits from her time at AU. Until then, she is working in an area about which she is passionate, including domestic and economic policy, and enjoying life as a newlywed, having just gotten married last summer.

Cameron continues to take advantage of AU’s community. She gleefully boasts about her love of hiring AU students for internships. She also attends an occasional alumni happy hour and sometimes indulges in nostalgic jogs to her alma mater from her house in Logan Circle. Above all, she is impressed by how much the university has grown in the last few years.

“When I was at AU, which wasn’t too long ago, they didn’t even have the [new] SIS building, but more than that, the school’s reputation has grown so much in the last few years. I love the WONK campaign. I think its so fitting.” says Cameron.

Above all, Cameron advises current students to take advantage of their professors and to say yes to every opportunity that presents itself. “I took the opportunity to go back for my master’s in public policy, and I can’t stress how amazing that experience was,” she remarks.

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Title: Stephanie Tinsley Regagnon’s Path to and from Washington included AU
Author: Phil Recchio
Subtitle:
Abstract: Alumna uses conversations to forge new partnerships.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 11/08/2013
Content:

Growing up in Kirksville, Mo., Stephanie Tinsley Regagnon, SPA/MA ’02, was never a stranger to the wide open farmlands of America’s agricultural landscape. After exploring academic options in law, she found her niche in politics and completed her undergraduate work at the University of Missouri. During a visit to D.C., she heard an AU radio advertisement during a cab ride and the following evening attended an open house for the School of Public Affairs. This spurred her matriculation to AU, and despite her family’s desire to keep her close to home, Stephanie traded her car in Missouri for a D.C. Metro card.

Working full-time while she got her master’s degree, Stephanie embodied the AU archetype of putting academic theory into practice. “Once I got to AU, I felt like I was doing what I wanted to do. School didn’t even feel like school; at that point it’s not about college, it’s about the rest of your life,” Regagnon remembers. In the evenings, she learned about advanced political theory and how it has played out in Washington, and the next morning she applied the teaching directly in her work for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.

One of Stephanie’s influential professors was Pat Griffin, whose experience as legislative affairs assistant to President Clinton shown through in the classroom. Griffin’s down-to-earth style and gregarious demeanor drove home the fact that Stephanie, a Beltway outsider, could do this work too. Griffin’s successes in bridging gaps between public and private partnerships paved the way for Stephanie to assert her skills in connecting people, ideas, and policies from seemingly disparate communities. 

In her current role as director of sustainable agriculture portfolio strategy at Monsanto, she continues to bridge gaps between local farmers, global tech innovations, and an inquisitive public. Balancing all of the needs and futures of these differing communities is no small feat, and Stephanie continues to rely on one of Pat Griffin’s teachings; “Be up front, be honest and be yourself.”

Having frank and informed conversations regarding controversial topics is part of Stephanie’s critical skillset. Years of having tough conversations around protecting agricultural resources around the globe has prepared her for promoting innovative and collaborative partnerships necessary to moving our collective environmental footprint forward.

Stephanie proudly states the critical role her AU education has played in her successes. Her dedication to education is evident and it continues to be her passion. After a personal family experience with the justice system, Stephanie founded Ava’s Grace Scholarship Foundation. Ava’s Grace has a mission of providing scholarships for higher education to children with incarcerated parents in the state of Missouri. The foundation currently funds two new students per year, giving $5,000 each of their four years in college or university. “In higher education there are scholarships for twins, diabetics and everything in between. There were no scholarships for children with incarcerated parents. As an at-risk population this was a need that wasn’t being addressed. At Ava’s Grace we are seeking to change that one child at a time in Missouri.” 

Academically, professionally and philanthropically, Stephanie is embodying AU’s pragmatic ethos by collaboratively engaging new connections and partnerships, while not shying away from tough conversations.

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Title: Turning Leadership and Mentorship Into Success
Author: Alexis Pazmiño, SPA/BA ’11
Subtitle:
Abstract: Marc Bender, SPA/BA ’97, is the chief investment officer at Cantor Fitzgerald Asset Management. During his time at American University, he was not only a student athlete but also a member of the SPA Leadership Program.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 08/12/2013
Content:

Marc Bender, SPA/BA ’97, attributes his success to his experiences as a student athlete and the SPA Leadership program. He is currently the Chief Investment Officer at Cantor Fitzgerald Asset Management, a global financial services firm in New York City.

Looking back at his tenure at AU, Bender considers himself fortunate to have participated in the SPA Leadership Program. “Richard Levick was our director and taught us a great deal about a wide range of areas, including everything from how to speak and articulate yourself in public to how to act around political dignitaries,” Bender says.

Recently, Bender met Margaret Marr, the current SPA leadership director, when he spoke to a group of current students and recent alumni. Bender regards Marr as a terrific leader who provides invaluable opportunities to her students. The SPA Leadership Program allows students to learn real-life leadership skills to pave the way for future success. “The wide reach of skills and walks of life touched by this program in a practical way is second to none in the life lessons you can learn at a young age,” Bender says proudly.

Bender was also a noted student athlete for all four years of his time at AU. During his time on the golf team, he competed against some of today’s best PGA Tour players, including John Rollins. Wade Heinzelman, Bender’s coach, proved inspirational to the young player. Bender recalls, “[Heinzelman] taught us a ton about everything from golf course management to custom golf equipment to having the right disposition on the course and how to focus on specific targets (both on and off the golf course).”

Bender balanced his responsibilities as a student-athlete while enjoying the classroom environment and social aspects of AU. He interned at the Public Defender’s Office where he had an eye-opening experience as he visited clients in all areas of D.C., including local jails.

Bender earned his J.D. from New York Law School immediately after earning his B.A. in Law and Society from AU. From there, he partnered with Donald Erenberg and Michael Friedman at First New York Securities, undertaking a management role in a prospering company.

Currently, Marc Bender is chief investment officer at Cantor Fitzgerald Asset Management. A large part of his role at Cantor Fitzgerald is finding undiscovered investment talent. He says of his work, “I get to constantly learn and enjoy the challenge of not looking at opportunities through rose colored glasses but actually understanding the risk/reward profile of each opportunity.” The position allows him to define truly valuable people and investments that are not only competent but also differentiated. Enjoying his challenging position, Bender notes that “[w]ithstanding the test of time requires hitting singles and doubles, with an occasional triple or home run - but the manager seeking grand slams often suffers big losses or goes out of business.”

Continuing with the sports metaphors (ever the AU athlete), Marc Bender has hit a home run as a leader in his own right.

A native of Great Neck, New York, Bender lives with his wife Rachel and their children in the New York metro area.

 

 

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