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Kogod Hosts Consulting Day

Photo. From left: Annie Genevish, corporate relations manager at Kogod's Center for Career Development, and juniors Elizabeth Watson and Chris Veasey at Consulting Day

From left: Annie Genevish, corporate relations manager at Kogod's Center for Career Development, and juniors Elizabeth Watson and Chris Veasey at Consulting Day. (Photo: Meghan Hayde)

How many ping pong balls fit in a 747?

How many golf balls are used in the U.S. every year?

How many commercials air on TV on a given day?

These questions are more than just brain teasers; for some Kogod School of Business students, reasoning through them may be the key to landing a job at a consulting firm.

Todd Egaas, a manager with Deloitte Consulting, shared the examples April 16 during Kogod’s Consulting Day.

“The point is not to get the right answer,” he said. “It’s to show your critical thinking, and how you conduct yourself.”

Along with brain teasers, case questions often are part of the interview process in the consulting field. Candidates are asked how they would go about approaching a business problem. One Egaas shared was that of a school district whose bussing costs have risen 85 percent in two years. What can be done to reduce costs?

To go about answering a case question, Egaas advised the students to approach the problem using a four step method:

•    identify the problem
•    think logically
•    analyze the data
•    communicate an action plan

After the presentation, Kogod held a career showcase and networking fair, which featured 14 consulting firms. About 75 students registered for the event.

“We want to facilitate networking opportunities between students and consulting professionals, and provide an inside view of what consulting really means and how students can leverage their experience into a consulting career,” said Meghan Hayde, Kogod’s associate director of corporate relations.

The event was a hit with students.

“I’m really interested in consulting because of all the different opportunities it provides,” said Elise Tisdale, a senior. “I’m not into sitting in a cube all day. I want something exciting, and I want something where I’m part of a team. I think consulting is that field