• Print

Career Success, Before Graduation

Will Hubbard, SIS/BA ‘11, secured a job through the Career Center's on-campus recruiting program.
(Photo by Sean McCormick.)

Though William Hubbard, SIS/BA ‘11, did not study business at American University (AU), he was confident that he had the leadership skills and professional background needed to pursue a career with one of Washington, D.C.,’s most prestigious companies.

Deloitte Consulting quickly recognized Hubbard's talents and extended a full-time job offer to him in October of 2010. Hubbard joined the company as a federal analyst upon graduation in May.

Hubbard’s academic background and varied leadership roles–-he served as the director of the Kennedy Political Union, is a member of the U.S. Marine Corp Reserves, and is the founder and president of AU’s chapter of Delta Phi Epsilon, an international relations fraternity–-made him stand out to employers.

At the age of 17 and prior to enrolling at AU, Hubbard enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corp Reserves. As a reservist, Hubbard trains on weekends and two weeks during the summer.  He also teamed up with his mother in 2008 to launch Jamie’s Chips, a flour tortilla chip company based on a family recipe. Their products are now distributed by 14 stores in the Chicago area.

For Deloitte Consulting, Hubbard’s unique experience in helping to build a small business from the ground up more than made up for his lack of business classes.

While Hubbard’s strong grasp of logistics and experience in management have helped him to land his analyst job, he stresses the importance of interpersonal skills in networking. Whether or not they have power or influence, he says, people want to be spoken to with respect, sincerity, and as professionals.

“All people want this same treatment, whether they’re in the president’s cabinet or they are a friend back home,” Hubbard says.
 
Such adept communication played a key role in Hubbard’s outreach to Deloitte Consulting, as he corresponded with recruiters before meeting them at a fall information session on campus.

“When I went to the session, I was able to match faces to names,” says Hubbard. “Other people were just meeting [the recruiting team], but I was reconnecting.”