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Economics | Global Majority E-Journal, Articles by Title

Global Majority

Please see below for all Global Marority articles, alphabetized by title:

 

BRAZIL'S ECONOMIC GROWTH: WITH OR WITHOUT PROSPERITY?

By Ana Cristina Sauri Faller
Currently, about 20 million people live in poverty (below US$2-a-day) in Brazil. The gap between the highest and the lowest social levels is high. A considerable part of Brazil's population does not have access to basic services such as clean water, food and education. This situation prevails despite the progress made since the mid-1990s, when Fernando Enrique Cardoso became president, followed by various social programs implemented by the government of Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, which lowered the percentage of people living below the poverty line considerably. Today, the biggest social challenge facing the Brazilian government and society remains to be a lack of education, housing, health care, and nutrition, especially for Brazil's poor children. Close to one million of such children live in favelas or in the streets confronting miserable living conditions and even starvation.

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The Caste System:
Effects on Poverty in India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka

By Jasmine Rao
Though mostly outlawed, the caste system continues to be one of the key drivers of poverty and inequality in South Asia. This article reviews the linkage between poverty and the caste system in India, Nepal and Sri Lanka. It also discusses the situation of the so-called Dalits (untouchables), which are typically considered to fall outside of the caste system. In addition to secondary evidence based on recent literature analyzing the relevance and impact of the caste system on poverty, the article is also based on an interview with a young male Indian, who experienced the impact of the caste system as well as the impact of the recently adopted reservation system for India's Dalits.

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THE CHILDREN OF NORTHERN UGANDA:
The Effects OF CIVIL WAR

By Madeline Beard
The primary focus of this article is on the exploitation of child soldiers in the northern Ugandan civil war, and the effects this exploitation will have on future generations. It discusses the conditions of child soldiers living in Northern Uganda and utilizes the work done by Invisible Children and other non-profit groups to expose their suffering. The article summarizes the key issues involving the conscription of child soldiers in the Lord's Resistance Army and links them to the lack of health care and education of child soldiers, as well as the vicious cycle of poverty these children continue to face.

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CLIMATE CHANGE IN CHINA: CAN CHINA BE A MODEL OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT?

By Hiromi Yagi
China has developed dramatically in terms of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Expressed in market exchange rates, its GDP overtook Japan's in 2010, making it the second largest economic power in the world. However, it recently also became the country with the largest amount of greenhouse gas emissions in the world. Its energy use (mostly consisting of carbon emitting coal and gas) has contributed to climate change, which has impacted not only the Chinese but also people all over the world. In recent years, China is changing its attitude about global warming, and is also trying to improve its energy system. This article reviews the empirical background of China's large greenhouse gas emission, the impact of climate change in China, and recent Chinese policies on global warming. It concludes that China needs strong institutions and the involvement of not only of the central government but also local government and citizens to effectively implement policy changes for sustainable development.

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Climate Change in Zambia: Impacts and Adaptation

By Couroche Kalantary  
This article summarizes the impacts of climate change in Zambia as well as Zambia's adaptation efforts, both of which are detailed in Zambia's National Adaptation Programme of Action (NAPA) of September 2007. The article provides also (1) a brief review of the Zambia-specific climate change literature and (2) some empirical background on Zambia's socio-economic status and Zambia's agriculture. Among others, the article comes to the conclusion that in addition to international assistance, the Zambian government needs to become more capable of providing some sort of security for its people.

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Effects of Neoliberal Reforms on Small-Scale
Agriculture in Brazil

By Alexandra Huddell
Following the 1980s debt crisis, many developing countries like Brazil were pushed by the International Monetary Fund to adopt a variety of neoliberal reforms which limited government interventions, reduced subsidies, and opened up the economy to international competition and trade. This article reviews the effects these neoliberal reforms had on small-scale agriculture in Brazil, by looking specifically at coffee farmers. It shows that even though production increased initially for all coffee producers, market competitiveness soon favored capital-intensive landowners and foreign interests and thus marginalized small rural farmers. The reforms also had the unintended consequences of an accelerated urban migration and environmental degradation.

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IMPACT INVESTING AS A SUPPLEMENT TO NICARAGUA'S TRADITIONAL MICROFINANCE

By Robert Book
There are too many good ideas in this world that go ignored and underfunded. By giving the less fortunate access to credit, microfinance has allowed millions of borrowers to fund their ideas for microenterprises. However, the impact these microenterprises have had may not extend very far beyond the individual borrower. Studies indicate that by investing in small and medium sized enterprises, more social impact would be generated. The purpose of this article is to suggest a new securities exchange that would facilitate the flow of capital from individuals globally to small and medium entrepreneurs in developing countries. In this article, this new securities exchange is applied to the case of Nicaragua.

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Indonesia: A Vulnerable Country in the Face of Climate Change

By Mariah Measey
This article reviews the causes of Indonesia's high greenhouse gas releases, the impacts climate change has on the country, and the effects of climate change. It shows that deforestation, forest fires and the degradation of peat land have been the main causes for Indonesia being the world's third largest emitter of greenhouse gases. It summarizes some of the main impacts climate change has in Indonesia, which include, but are not limited to: temperature increase, intense rainfall, sea level rise, and a threat to food security. It examines the effects climate change has on (i) Indonesia's economy and poor people, (ii) human health, and (iii) Indonesia's environment and biodiversity. 

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Maternal Schooling in Pakistan:
The Girl Effect in Action

By Lisa Gabrielson
In Pakistan, women have long been second-class citizens due to a deeply embedded set of religious and cultural values that have prevented equality between men and women, and between boys and girls. Recently, the Pakistani government has been investing a large amount of funds into education. While in the past most of the Pakistani Government's segregated education funding went mostly to boys' schools, there has been increased international pressure to expand the availability of primary education to girls. The collateral effect of women's education expands far beyond the ability to read and write. Women with an education have more influence and more bargaining power when it comes to making decisions, which is beneficial for their families as well as society. When women are educated there is a drastic decrease in fertility, maternal mortality, infant mortality, and child mortality. This is called the girl effect. This paper reviews the girl effect based on the recent experience in Pakistan.

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POVERTY AND FERTILITY IN INDIA: SOME FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO A POSITIVE CORRELATION

By Brittany Traeger
India has diminishing population growth rates and fertility rates; however, they still remain high compared to the world average. The families living in poverty are those having the most children because they are consistently trapped in poverty from generation to generation with little opportunity. Poor families are typically larger because they use children as a source of generating income via child labor. Parents also have children for insurance purposes because they envision needing help when they get older. All children born into poverty, especially girls, have little opportunity to escape from it in adulthood because of the lack of education and power. Another cause for high fertility rates is the large unmet need for family planning among the poor. Investing in family planning amongst the poor would be efficient to reduce fertility rates and poverty. Furthermore, increases in school enrollments, (including for girls) result in more power for females and thus decreasing fertility rates.

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Poverty in Nigeria: Some Dimensions and Contributing Factors

by Chimobi Ucha   
Unemployment, corruption, non-diversification of the economy, income inequality, laziness, and a poor education system can be considered to be some of the key factors contributing to poverty in Nigeria. This article analyzes these factors after reviewing some of the most recent contributions to the literature and summarizing some of the key dimensions of poverty in Nigeria. It also shows that there are various linkages between the six key factors as well as enforcing feedbacks from the various dimensions of poverty in Nigeria.

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POVERTY IN CENTRAL ASIA:
KAZAKHSTAN VERSUS TAJIKISTAN

By Gregory Chapman
This article reviews the existence and nature of poverty in the two very different Central Asian nations of Kazakhstan and Tajikistan. Kazakhstan is oil-rich and agriculturally productive. Tajikistan is poor, rural, isolated and mountainous. Summarizing the nature of poverty in these two countries, this article seeks to understand some of the driving factors behind it. Though by no means comprehensive or complete, this article illustrates the vast differences between these two countries of the same "neighborhood" and, sadly, one has great hope of outgrowing poverty and the other has not.

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Poverty in BOLIVIA:
DIMENSIONS, POLITICAL CONFLICT AND STRATEGIES

By Eliza Morgan
Bolivia is one of the poorest and most unequal countries in Latin America. This article discusses several dimensions of Bolivia's poverty, including income poverty and inequality, lack of access to safe water and sanitation, high infant mortality, malnutrition, and a lack of basic infrastructure. The country suffers from both urban and rural poverty, though rural poverty is prominent. After summarizing some of the relevant literature and giving some empirical background about the country, this article discusses various dimensions of poverty in Bolivia, focusing on the struggles that face the 10 million people living there today. There have been major political conflicts in the last few decades that have lasting effects on the nation. Despite the conflicts, Bolivia is showing its dedication to reduce poverty, but this is a process that will need to continue for many years in the future.

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Sinking the Pearl of the Indian Ocean:
Climate Change in Sri Lanka

By Nazran Baba
This article analyzes the impact of climate change on Sri Lanka. It recognizes that climate change is a multidimensional phenomenon which does not only impact the environment but also Sri Lanka's economy, health and society. The article provides a literature review and some empirical background on Sri Lanka's greenhouse gas emissions before analyzing the gravity of climate change in Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka's options to reacting to this global phenomenon via mitigation and adaptation will also be addressed briefly.

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THE URBAN PLAN FOR INDIA: A FOUNDATION FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH

By Will Lawther
Asia's urban population is estimated to double between 2000 and 2030. India is the dominant force in South Asia, and the vastly diverse country is by no means isolated from the growing urban movement. Urban environments have statistically shown as being epicenters for economic growth, resource development, and occupational opportunities. Urbanization has been the fundamental factor of economic growth within the industrial age. Yet, to many public officials, urbanization is seen as a hindrance to growth. Potential negative implications of urbanization include an increase in the propensity of crime, poverty and insecurity. These negative implications need to be managed in order to lift India's developing status. The cost-benefit ratio for India is clear, and planning, housing, infrastructure and the spreading of social services are paramount issues on the docket of urbanization.

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The WATER CRISIS IN KENYA:
CAUSES, EFFECTS AND SOLUTIONS

By Samantha Marshall
Located on the eastern coast of Africa, Kenya, a generally dry country with a humid climate, is enduring a severe water crisis. Several issues such as global warming (causing recurrent and increasingly severe droughts as well as floods), the contamination of drinking water, and a lack of investment in water resources have enhanced the crisis. This article provides an overview of Kenya's water crisis, along with a brief review of the literature and some empirical background. It reviews the main causes of the water crisis and how it affects the health of millions of Kenyans. Furthermore, the article summarizes some of the main solutions proposed to overcome the crisis.

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The Water Crisis in Yemen:
Causes, Consequences and Solutions

By Nicole Glass   
Yemen, a country located in a dry and semi-arid region of the Middle East, is already facing a severe water crisis. Mostly due to high population growth, misguided agricultural development and the growth of qat, a lack of law enforcement to regulate water use, and a vulnerable climate to climate change, the crisis may soon reach catastrophic levels. Beyond a brief description of the main causes of Yemen's water crisis, this article also provides a brief overview of the literature, some empirical background, an analysis on the consequences, and a discussion of some of the proposed solutions to Yemen's water crisis.

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