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Economics | Field Courses

If you are interested in...   Take some of these ECON courses.
     
  • Why some countries are rich and others poor
 

318 (Economic History of the World)
319 (U.S. Economic History)
351 or 551 (Comparative Economic Systems)
353 or 552 (Economic Transformation of Central/Eastern Europe)
361 (Development Economics)
362 (Microeconomics of Development)
363 (Macroeconomics of Development)
555 (Development of Latin America)
358 (Economics of World Regions)
332 (Money, Banking and Finance in the Global Economy)
370, 371, 372 (International Economics) *

     
  • Why some people within a country are rich while others are poor
  317 (Political Economy)
353 (Economic Transformation of Central/Eastern Europe)
371 or 571 (Labor Economics)
374 or 574 (Gender Roles/Women in the Economy)
325 (Social Choice and Economic Justice)
318 (Economic History of the World)
319 (U.S. Economic History)
     
  • What government does well and what it does poorly
  317 (Political Economy)
318 (Economic History of the World)
319 (U.S. Economic History)
332 (Money, Banking and Finance in the Global Economy)
325 (Social Choice and Economic Justice)
341 or 541 (Public Economics)
346, 546 (Competition, Regulation and Business Strategies)
547 (Antitrust and Regulation)
353 (Economic Transformation of Central/Eastern Europe)
358 (Economics of World Regions)
379 or 579 (Econ of Environmental Policy)
383, 384, 385 (Washington Economic Policy) *
     
  • How the modern economic way of thinking emerge
  317 (Political Economy)
320 (History of Economic Ideas)
     
  • How the economic way of thinking adds perspective to issues that dominate the other social science disciplines?
  317 (Political Economy)
318 (Economic History of the World)
319 (U.S. Economic History)
325 (Social Choice and Economic Justice)
383, 384, 385 (Washington Economic Policy) *
     
    * Note: You only count six hours of credit from the Washington Semester in Economic Policy towards the major.


If you have a special interest in a subject related to Economics that you would like to pursue but that does not fall into the subject matter of an economics course, you may seek out an interested Economics Department faculty member to supervise your independent study (ECON-490) or independent reading (ECON-390). You may also obtain an internship or co-op for credit (ECON-396). Exceptional students may be invited by a professor to take an Internship in Teaching Economics (ECON-492). Up to three credits may be fulfilled by one of these kinds of independent study.

Using Courses Outside of Economics to Count Towards the Economics Major

The Economics Department encourages its BA students to pursue joint majors by allowing one 300-or-higher-level courses to be counted towards the major in place of an ECON-3xx course for the BA. Outside courses must be substantially related to economics. Discuss with your academic advisor in the Economics Department which of these courses you would like to count towards your econ major. Special permission must be obtained from your faculty advisor in Economics to count other outside courses towards the major.

The Economics Department encourages students to participate in study abroad and in other AU programs. Up to six credits of 300-or-higher-level economics-related courses from study abroad programs or from the Washington Semester in Economic Policy may be counted towards the major. Special permission must be obtained from your faculty advisor in economics to count other study abroad courses towards the major.