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Catherine Stoodley

Associate Professor Department of Psychology

Catherine Stoodley is interested in the neuroscience of cognitive development, particularly the role of the human cerebellum in cognition, cognitive development and in neurodevelopmental disorders. She uses clinical studies, structural and functional neuroimaging, neuromodulation with transcranial direct current stimulation, and behavioral testing to investigate the functional anatomy of the cerebellum and the type of processing that the cerebellum performs.

Degrees

DPhil, Neuroscience, University of Oxford
MS, Neuroscience, University of Oxford
BS Biology, Tufts University

Office
CAS - Psychology
Asbury - 321B
Contact Info
(202) 885-1785 (Office)

Send email to Catherine Stoodley

For the Media
To request an interview for a news story, call AU Communications at 202-885-5950 or submit a request.
See Also
Lab website

Teaching

AU Expert

Area of Expertise:

Brain bases of typical development and developmental disorders, such as dyslexia, ADHD, and autism spectrum disorder; the role of the human cerebellum in movement, cognition, development and developmental disorders.

Additional Information:

Catherine Stoodley is a neuroscientist who is interested in the brain bases of typical development and developmental disorders, such as developmental dyslexia, attention deficit disorder, and autism. Her doctoral research at the University of Oxford focused on how basic visual, auditory and motor functions contribute to reading and reading disorders in both adults and children. She has also investigated whether children and adults with developmental dyslexia have difficulty with a particular type of learning, implicit learning, and whether this is specific to dyslexia or more generally seen in poor readers. As a postdoctoral research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, she used brain imaging to study a particular region of the brain, the cerebellum, and its role in both movement and cognitive processes (such as language and memory). The StoodleyLab employs clinical studies, structural and functional neuroimaging, neuromodulation with transcranial direct current stimulation, and behavioral testing to investigate the functional anatomy of the cerebellum and the type of processing that the cerebellum performs. Current projects focus on the role of the human cerebellum in cognition, cognitive development, and in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder. Stoodley teaches courses in developmental neuroscience and the brain bases of behavior, and directs the developmental neuroscience lab at AU.

Media Relations
To request an interview please call AU Media Relations at 202-885-5950 or submit an interview request form.

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