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Course Numbers 0-99

HIST-078

Civil War Institute (0)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Noncredit option. This week-long summer program introduces participants to the key causes and consequences of the war by exploring its remnants and remembrances in the Washington, D.C. area. The intensive program combines morning presentations and discussions with afternoon field trips. Sites include Harper's Ferry, Antietam, Arlington National Cemetery, Sherman and Grant Memorials, Howard University, Fort Stevens, Frederick Douglass Home, Ford's Theater, and a full-day trip to Richmond. Meets with HIST-478/678. Usually offered every summer.

 

HIST-085

Hiroshima, Nagasaki & Beyond (0)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Noncredit option. Summer study trip to Japan in conjunction with the Nuclear Studies Institute. Focuses on Japanese wartime aggression, the human devastation wrought by the atomic bombings, current Japanese and international efforts to eliminate nuclear weapons, and the building of closer ties between the people of the United States and Japan. Participants hear first-hand accounts of atomic bomb survivors and Asian victims of Japanese atrocities, visit sites of historical and cultural significance, and attend commemorative events. Meets with HIST-485/685. Usually offered every summer.

 

HIST-095

Course Level: Study Abroad

 

HIST-096

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (0)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

HIST-099

Course Level: Graduate


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Course Numbers 100-299

HIST-100

History, Memory, and the Changeable Past FA2 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course explores how families, communities, and nations construct memories into a sense of shared history. Drawing upon sources such as novels, memoirs, and visual images, it compares these memory-building processes with the methods of professional historians. The course demonstrates how different perspectives of an event can create radically different historical understandings. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-110

Renaissance and Revolutions: Europe, 1400-1815 FA2 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Explores transformations in the culture, society, politics, and intellectual life of early modern Europe, such as the Italian Renaissance, the print revolution, the Reformation, European expansionism, New World slavery, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment and the French Revolution. Usually offered every term.

 

HIST-120

Imperialism in History FA3 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course traces the history of modern imperialism and resistance to it. It includes the nature of colonial rule, the rise of modern nationalism and post colonial states, and the political, social, religious, cultural, demographic, environmental, economic, and intellectual revolutions that produced and were produced by the rise of modern empires. Usually offered every term.

 

HIST-130

History of American Popular Culture (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course explores the origins and cultural politics of American popular culture from the rise of commercial entertainment in the nineteenth century through the 1990s. Course readings introduce students to the cultural history of minstrelsy, circuses, film, radio, and television as commodities and as expressions of identity and community affiliation. Close attention is paid to key theoretical issues, including how popular culture has informed ideas about race and national identity over time, with consideration of how American popular forms have been increasingly created and deployed by corporations for commercial profit, but also used and often recreated by audiences. Finally, the course explores the global dimensions of American popular culture and questions of authenticity, imperialism, and globalization. The course requires intensive reading in history and cultural studies and active class participation. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-140

Modern European History: 1750 to Present FA2 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

A history of Europe from 1750 to the present, emphasizing the development of new political traditions and social structures, the establishment of new forms of international organization, the transformation of work, changes in the lived environment, and the evolution of understandings of the self. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-194

Course Level: Undergraduate

 

HIST-196

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

HIST-202

The Ancient World: Greece (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

A political and cultural history of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period. Readings are drawn primarily from primary sources but some consideration is given to modern interpretations of key events such as the Peloponnesian Wars. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-203

The Ancient World: Rome (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

A political and social history of the ancient Roman world from c. 1000 BC to c. 476 CE. Lectures focus on the political events of the Republic and the Empire that succeeded it, while readings cover a broad range of social issues from the family and society to education and religion. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-204

Medieval Europe (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Exploration of the medieval world-view and consideration of the organization of economic and political institutions, the relationship of secular and ecclesiastical authority, and the creation of new social and religious ideals during the millennium that bridges antiquity and modernity. Usually offered alternate springs.

 

HIST-205

American Encounters: 1492-1865 FA2 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The history of the United States to 1865: the expansion and transplantation of European civilization; the Native American response; the sectional contest over slavery; the birth of the American feminist movement; and the beginnings of the industrial revolution. Usually offered every term.

 

HIST-206

U.S. History Since 1865 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This introductory course covers American history from the end of the Civil War. Topics include the modernization of America, the United States and international affairs, the growing cultural diversity of the American people, and challenges to traditional ideologies and political solutions.

 

HIST-208

African-American History: to 1877 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course covers the Atlantic slave trade, the African presence in Colonial America, the American Revolution, nineteenth-century American slavery, the Underground Railroad, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. The course utilizes historical eyewitness accounts, maps, and popular culture to explore the arrival and historical journey of Africans from the Colonial and Revolutionary eras through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-209

African-American History: 1877 to Present (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Beginning with a brief review of the Civil War and Reconstruction, this survey chronicles the history of African-Americans to the present time. The course uses historical and literary texts and makes use of cultural resources such as films, recordings, art works, and museum exhibitions to explore the richness of this legacy and its impact on the development of American culture and history. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-210

Ethnicity in America FA4 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Explores how ethnicity has shaped American institutions and behavior patterns from 1607 to the present. Largely a nation of immigrants, this country reflects the racial, religious, and national characteristics of those who migrated here, whether voluntarily or as slaves. Includes ethnicity's influence on family, politics, civil rights, and foreign policy. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-214

History of the World Regions (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics offered through various AU Abroad programs focus on sophisticated analyses of historical developments of a specific region and/or time period.

 

HIST-215

Social Forces that Shaped America FA2 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The history of race, class, and gender in the United States from the war for independence to the present. The focus is on how these forces existed and continue to exist as intersecting material realities and contributors to the social attitudes held by residents of the United States. Usually offered every term.

 

HIST-219

Women in America to 1850 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Traces the history of women in America from the sixteenth through the mid-nineteenth century, concentrating on the lived experiences of women as well as on the changing definitions, perceptions, and uses of gender. Particular attention is paid to race, ethnicity, and class, as well as to regional cultures. Additional themes include family, work, and religion. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-220

Women in America since 1850 FA4 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Incorporating a multidisciplinary perspective; both primary and secondary readings, this course examines change and continuity in the experience of American women from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Focuses on social and political movements of special concern to women, including suffrage, birth control, women's liberation, and contemporary antifeminism. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-221

History of Britain I (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Political, social, and cultural development in Britain to 1689. Parliament, common law, civil war, plague, rebellion, concepts of kingship, and the conflict of church and state. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-222

History of Britain II (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course examines phenomena that have defined Britain's place in the world, such as the ascension of parliament, the industrial revolution, and the growth of empire, to understand what is unique about Britain and which elements of the British historical experience are more broadly shared. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-225

Russia and the Origins of Contemporary Eurasia FA3 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course provides an overview and introduction to the history of empires, nations, and states in the Eurasian plain, from the origins of Rus' over a thousand years ago to the present day, as well as the various ethnic, national, and religious groups of the region.

 

HIST-231

The Russian Empire, 1650-1917 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course provides an overview of the Romanov dynasty and the Russian Empire focusing on understanding the structures of the diverse society which made up the empire, the growth and modernization of the empire, and the tensions within the system which led to its collapse. Readings include historical narratives, documents and novels.

 

HIST-232

The Soviet Union (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course treats the history of the Soviet Union (1917-1991), seeking to explain how this civilization arose, survived, and ultimately fell, with particular attention to the history of communism as an idea. Readings help give a sense of both the aspirations and sufferings of its citizens.

 

HIST-235

The West in Crisis, 1900-1945 FA2 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course examines the great crises of the first half of the twentieth century, including the two world wars, the global great depression, and comunist and fascist revolutions and dictatorships. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-239

Topics in European History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include national histories, nineteenth-century Europe, and Europe and colonialism.

 

HIST-241

Colonial Latin America (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Conquest and change in Indian civilization; imperial politics; race and class; Indian labor and the Black legend; imperial economic relations; imperial reform and revolution. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-242

Latin America since Independence (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Problems in creating nations; militarism, dictatorship, and democracy; sources of underdevelopment; reform and revolution in the twentieth century. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-245

Modern Jewish Civilization (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Surveys Jewish responses to the challenges of modernity. Examines the creation of new Jewish communities in America and Israel, shifts in Jewish political status, and innovations in Jewish religious and intellectual history such as Zionism and Hasidism. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-248

Introduction to Middle Eastern History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The Middle East escapes any single definition; it has no readily-defined geographic, ethnic, religious, or political boundaries. This course surveys the historical experiences, institutions, and events that have connected the region's diverse peoples from the rise of Islam to the present. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-250

Empires and States in East Asia FA3 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course examines the origins and history of multiple imperial traditions throughout East Asian history, including ancient China (origins to 221 B.C.); Chinese empires (221 B.C. to 1912); the Japanese empire (1895-1945); and modern East Asia (1600-present).

 

HIST-288

Oliver Stone's America (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Director Oliver Stone's influence on popular views of recent U.S. history has raised important questions about artistic license, the nature and uses of historical evidence, and the shaping of popular historical consciousness. This course addresses these issues while assessing both scholarly opinion and popular beliefs about the Kennedy assassination, the Vietnam War and antiwar movement, the 1960s counterculture, Watergate, U.S. policy in Central America, the 1980s capitalistic culture, and 9/11 and the presidency of George W. Bush. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-294

Course Level: Undergraduate

 

HIST-296

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

HIST-299

Conversations in History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. This intensive seminar introduces majors to the study of history. By delving into a topic, students learn various approaches to the study of history that have evolved over time, as well as the mechanics of writing history. Usually offered every term.


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Course Numbers 300-599

HIST-305

Topics in Race and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include Latinos and Latinas in United States history; Native American history; and Asian American history.

 

HIST-314

History of the World Regions (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics offered through various AU Abroad programs focus on sophisticated analyses of historical developments of a specific region and/or time period and an in-depth exploration of the historical, cultural, and social contexts of the region or time period discussed.

 

HIST-322

History of Britain: 1815-Present (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Offered as part of the AU Abroad London program, this course examines the key political, social, and cultural developments of Great Britain over the past two hundred years, from war with France and world-wide imperial expansion to the present with Britain as a medium-sized state torn between allegiance to its former colonies, America, and the expanding European Union.

 

HIST-327

Twentieth Century Europe (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

In this century Europe has experienced two major wars, a wave of communist revolution, a violent reaction in the form of fascism, and the horror of mass extermination. Yet Europe today is quite prosperous, and there are better links between the Western countries and their communist counterparts than could be imagined two decades ago. There is something in Europe's past that gives it a certain resilience. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-344

Topics in Jewish History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics in Jewish history exploring one theme, or period, or geographical region of the Jewish past, including the history of women in Jewish tradition, East European Jewry, the world of the shtetl, American Jewish women, and anti-Semitism.

 

HIST-390

Independent Reading Course in History (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

HIST-411

Atlantic World Studies (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include ideas of science and faith, exchange of goods and scientific knowledge, diasporas, and comparative slavery. Some background in European and U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-611.

 

HIST-412

Studies in European History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include women and gender, European thought and ideologies, nineteenth-century revolutions, development of the social sciences, Eastern and Central Europe of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, modern Germany, the Republic of Letters, and media and mass culture. Some background in European history is recommended. Meets with HIST-612.

 

HIST-418

Nazi Germany (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The political, social, and economic conditions that made it possible for Hitler to take power. The nature of Nazi rule. Emphasis on World War II and the Holocaust. Meets with HIST-618. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-419

Holocaust (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Traces the history of anti-Semitism and the development of racism that led to the Holocaust. Examines the historical development of the Final Solution. Considers the variety of responses to Jewish persecution by the Nazi perpetrators, the Jews, and the nations of the world. Meets with HIST-619. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-437

British Studies (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including Hanoverian England, Victorian England, Edwardian England, the British Empire, the British working class, and popular culture in modern Britain. Meets with HIST-637.

 

HIST-438

French History Since 1789 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Covers the major issues and problems in the history of modern France. With an emphasis on social and cultural history, it treats subjects such as the revolutionary tradition in France, nationalism, peasant life, worker culture, domesticity and family life, urbanism, empire, the World Wars, consumerism, and Americanization. Course materials include memoirs, novels, and films. Meets with HIST-638. Usually offered alternate springs.

 

HIST-440

Latin American Studies (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including the diplomatic history of Latin America, Latin American intellectual history, and Latin American feminisms. Meets with HIST-640.

 

HIST-443

History of Israel (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Traces the development of modern political Zionism in nineteenth-century Europe; the historical background leading to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948; and the history of Israel since then, including patterns of Jewish immigration and its relationship to the Arab world. Meets with HIST-643. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-445

Russian Studies (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including Russian intellectual history, World War I and the end of empires, the Russian Revolution, and Russian film history. Meets with HIST-645.

 

HIST-447

Asian Studies (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Topical courses in Asian history including modern China, late imperial China, the Japanese empire, modern Eurasian frontiers, and other topics in Chinese, Japanese, and inner Asian history. Meets with HIST-647.

 

HIST-448

American Culture in the Nuclear Age: Living with the Bomb

Course Level: Undergraduate

Examines the evolution of American culture in the nuclear age, with particular emphasis on the ways in which the threat of nuclear war and annihilation have shaped American thought and behavior. Central to this study is an exploration of the history of the nuclear arms race in the context of the politics, culture, and diplomacy of the Cold War. Meets with HIST-648. Usually offered every summer and alternate falls.

 

HIST-449

Topics in U.S. History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include labor and workers, espionage and national security, radical tradition, political movements, science and technologies, film and history, and families and childhood. Some background in U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-649.

 

HIST-450

Colonial America 1492-1763 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The founding and development of England's North American colonies, emphasizing the original impulses and methods of colonization; Indian peoples and conflict; non-English immigration; the genesis and African background of the slave trade and slavery; and the creation of a dominant English culture in an ethnically and racially diverse society. Meets with HIST-650. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-451

Era of the Revolution and Constitution (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The political and social history of the American Revolution, emphasizing the genesis of the revolutionary conflict, the revolution as a "republican revolution," the revolution's ideological and social results and their effect abroad, and the formation of the Constitution. Meets with HIST-651. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-452

The Era of the New Republic 1789-1850 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The new republic's political consolidation during its first critical decades; its physical, economic, and political transformation by continental expansion; the transportation and industrial revolutions and the creation of a mass democracy; and the first confrontations over slavery in 1832-33 and 1848-50. Meets with HIST-652. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-453

Civil War and Reconstruction (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Chronological coverage from the Compromise of 1850 to the final withdrawal of federal troops from the South in 1877. Includes antebellum reform, sectional conflict, black slavery, secession, and postwar racial and political problems. Political and social issues are emphasized, rather than a narrative of battles and skirmishes. Meets with HIST-653. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-454

The South Since Reconstruction (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The theme is the South's struggle with the issues of integration, separation, and self-definition since the Civil War. Reconstruction and redemption, race relations, violence, the rise and fall of the "Solid South," and the "New South" of Jimmy Carter. Meets with HIST-654. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-455

Emergence of Modern America: 1877-1920 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The course considers themes in the modernization of America: the rise of corporations and cities, the influx of immigrants from southern and eastern Europe, and the advent of the new diplomacy and imperialism. Also studies populism and progressivism. Meets with HIST-655. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-456

Twentieth-Century America (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Life in the twentieth century is different from all other periods of our past. To understand why requires an examination of the explosion of science and technology, the growth of government, America's increasing involvement in the world, the multiplication of protest and liberation movements, the new politics, and neo-Keynesian economics. Meets with HIST-656.

 

HIST-457

America Between Wars, 1919-1941 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Following a decade of stability and prosperity, the dislocations caused by the Great Depression disrupted the lives and shook the institutions of the American people, leading to unprecedented political and cultural experimentation. Emphasizing both the contrasts and continuities between the 1920s and 1930s, the course investigates the patterns of political, social, cultural, economic, and intellectual life during the interwar period, with special emphasis on the tensions between radical and conservative tendencies. Meets with HIST-657.

 

HIST-459

Topics in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Examines the changing definitions, perceptions, and uses of gender and sexuality in U.S. history. Rotating topics include women's suffrage, images of masculinity, and gay rights. Based on the assumption that gender and sexuality are historically-specific cultural constructs, special attention is paid to their intersection with race, class, and ethnicity. Meets with HIST-659. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-460

U.S. Foreign Relations, 1774-1918 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The history of United States diplomacy (and other forms of international relations) from the Revolution to World War I. Focus on policymaking and makers; on long-term issues such as unilateralism, imperialism, and neutrality; and on economics and ideology. Meets with HIST-660. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-461

U.S. Foreign Relations since 1918 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The history of United States diplomacy (and other forms of international relations) since World War I. Focus on policymaking and makers; on such long-term issues as isolationism, unilateralism, and interventionism; on ideology, economics, and related domestic politics; and on growing U.S. attention to military and national security affairs. Meets with HIST-661. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-462

America and the Cold War (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Focusing on the years 1945-1989, this course explores the international and domestic origins of the Cold War, its impact on American politics and culture, the rise of the national security state, relations with Europe and the developing world, and crises such as the Korean war, the Cuban missile crisis, and Vietnam. Meets with HIST-662.

 

HIST-464

U.S. Presidential Elections (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course reinterprets U.S. history from the perspective of the nation's quadrennial contests for national leadership. It shows how presidential elections both reflect and influence major trends and episodes of the American past. The course combines narrative history with political and economic models to present a comprehensive theory of American presidential elections. A portion of the course focuses on the current election cycle, with guest speakers contributing information and adding to analysis. Meets with HIST-664. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-467

Oral History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course presents the theory, practice, legal and ethical issues, and uses of oral history. Through field work, students gain interviewing, transcription, and analysis skills and studies the advantages and limitations of oral history as source material. Reading and case histories are drawn from modern U.S. history. Meets with HIST-667. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-468

Topics in Public History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include history and public policy, media and history, regional and local histories, and historic sites. Some background in U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-668.

 

HIST-469

History of Medicine in U.S.: From Smallpox to Aids (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Health, disease, and medicine's role in American society and culture with a special focus on health dangers posed by industrialization, urbanization, and immigration. Disease and its social construction have been an important dimension of American culture and definitions of health and disease are important barometers of who we are as a people. Epidemics (including AIDS), the hospital, ethnicity, race, urban health care, controversies in medical ethics, and medical discoveries. Meets with HIST-669. Usually offered alternate springs.

 

HIST-470

Visual and Material Culture (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course combines two interdisciplinary and often overlapping areas of study for examination by students of history: material and visual cultural studies. The course introduces students to historiography and cultural theory in both fields and examines methodologies for using visual and material sources to study American cultural and social history. Meets with HIST-670. Usually offered alternate springs.

 

HIST-471

Ideology, Culture, and American Politics (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

How have American political leaders justified their objectives? How have popular beliefs and attitudes been reflected in the American political system? This course, concentrating on the twentieth century, explores the relationship between American political life on the one hand and ideas and popular persuasions on the other. Meets with HIST-671.

 

HIST-473

American Jewish History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Today American Jewry constitutes the preeminent Diaspora Jewish community. This course traces its historical development by examining the waves of Jewish immigration to the United States and the institutions that American Jews created to sustain their community. Meets with HIST-673. Usually offered alternate springs.

 

HIST-476

U.S. Environmental History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Environmental history introduces nature, including plants, animals, climate, weather, and soil, as a central aspect of its analysis. This course examines the role nature plays in North America's history from the breakup of Pangaea to the rise of the American lawn. The course further explores how humans have reshaped the continent's ecosystems over time. Meets with HIST-676. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-477

History and New Media (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This course explores the impact of new information technologies on historical practices, focusing on research, teaching, presentations of historical materials, and changes in professional organization and discourse. Some background in U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-677. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-478

Civil War Institute (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

This week-long summer program introduces participants to the key causes and consequences of the war by exploring its remnants and remembrances in the Washington, D.C. area. The intensive program combines morning presentations and discussions with afternoon field trips. Sites include Harper's Ferry, Antietam, Arlington National Cemetery, Sherman and Grant Memorials, Howard University, Fort Stevens, Frederick Douglass Home, Ford's Theater, and a full-day trip to Richmond. Meets with HIST-678. Usually offered every summer.

 

HIST-479

Topics in African American History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include American slavery, African American women, the civil rights movement, and race relations in the United States. Some background in U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-679.

 

HIST-480

Senior Thesis in History I (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Methods and materials of historical research and writing. Students design and outline research subjects based in part on the use of primary sources. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: HIST-299 and senior standing with minimum 3.3 GPA.

 

HIST-481

Senior Thesis in History II (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Continuation of HIST-480. Completion of senior thesis based in part on the use of primary sources. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: HIST-480 and senior standing with minimum 3.3 GPA.

 

HIST-482

Research Seminar (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. This seminar introduces students to a field of research not limited geographically, for example, military history, gender history, revolutions, etc. Students complete a series of common readings and then design, outline, research, and write their own historical research papers on a topic of their choice relating to the course theme. Papers are built on primary sources and engage the historiographical questions most relevant to the topic. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: HIST-299.

 

HIST-485

Hiroshima, Nagasaki & Beyond (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Summer study trip to Japan in conjunction with the Nuclear Studies Institute. Focuses on Japanese wartime aggression, the human devastation wrought by the atomic bombings, current Japanese and international efforts to eliminate nuclear weapons, and the building of closer ties between the people of the United States and Japan. Participants hear first-hand accounts of atomic bomb survivors and Asian victims of Japanese atrocities, visit sites of historical and cultural significance, and attend commemorative events. Meets with HIST-685. Usually offered every summer.

 

HIST-490

Independent Study Project in History (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

HIST-491

Internship (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

HIST-496

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

HIST-500

Studies in History (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics in early modern European history, European colonialism in the Caribbean, nineteenth and twentieth century European studies, Russian and Soviet studies, American political, social, and cultural studies, and American diplomatic and military studies. Usually offered every term.

 

HIST-590

Independent Reading Course in History (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

HIST-596

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


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Course Numbers 600-899

HIST-611

Atlantic World Studies (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include interpretations of the new world, ideas of science and faith, exchange of goods and scientific knowledge, diasporas, and comparative slavery. Some background in European and U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-411.

 

HIST-612

Studies in European History (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include women and gender, European thought and ideologies, nineteenth-century revolutions, development of the social sciences, Eastern and Central Europe of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, modern Germany, the Republic of Letters, and media and mass culture. Some background in European history is recommended. Meets with HIST-412.

 

HIST-618

Nazi Germany (3)

Course Level: Graduate

The political, social, and economic conditions that made it possible for Hitler to take power. The nature of Nazi rule. Emphasis on World War II and the Holocaust. Meets with HIST-418. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-619

Holocaust (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Traces the history of anti-Semitism and the development of racism that led to the Holocaust. Examines the historical development of the Final Solution. Considers the variety of responses to Jewish persecution by the Nazi perpetrators, the Jews, and the nations of the world. Meets with HIST-419. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-637

British Studies (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including Hanoverian England, Victorian England, Edwardian England, the British Empire, the British working class, and popular culture in modern Britain. Meets with HIST-437.

 

HIST-638

French History since 1789 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Covers the major issues and problems in the history of modern France. With an emphasis on social and cultural history, it treats subjects such as the revolutionary tradition in France, nationalism, peasant life, worker culture, domesticity and family life, urbanism, empire, the World Wars, consumerism, and Americanization. Course materials include memoirs, novels, and films. Meets with HIST-438. Usually offered alternate springs.

 

HIST-640

Latin American Studies (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics, including the diplomatic history of Latin America, Latin American intellectual history, and Latin American feminisms. Meets with HIST-440.

 

HIST-643

History of Israel (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Traces the development of modern political Zionism in nineteenth-century Europe; the historical background leading to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948; and the history of Israel since then, including patterns of Jewish immigration and its relationship to the Arab world. Meets with HIST-443. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-645

Russian Studies (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including Russian intellectual history, World War I and the end of empires, the Russian Revolution, and Russian film history. Meets with HIST-445.

 

HIST-647

Asian Studies (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Topical courses in Asian history including modern China, late imperial China, the Japanese empire, modern Eurasian frontiers, and other topics in Chinese, Japanese, and inner Asian history. Meets with HIST-447.

 

HIST-648

American Culture in the Nuclear Age: Living with the Bomb (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Examines the evolution of American culture in the nuclear age, with particular emphasis on the ways in which the threat of nuclear war and annihilation have shaped American thought and behavior. Central to this study is an exploration of the history of the nuclear arms race in the context of the politics, culture, and diplomacy of the Cold War. Meets with HIST-448. Usually offered every summer and alternate falls.

 

HIST-649

Topics in U.S. History (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include labor and workers, espionage and national security, radical tradition, political movements, science and technologies, film and history, and families and childhood. Some background in U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-449.

 

HIST-650

Colonial America: 1492 to 1763 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

The founding and development of England's North American colonies, emphasizing the original impulses and methods of colonization; Indian peoples and conflict; non-English immigration; the genesis and African background of the slave trade and slavery; and the creation of a dominant English culture in an ethnically and racially diverse society. Meets with HIST-450. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-651

Era of the Revolution and Constitution (3)

Course Level: Graduate

The political and social history of the American Revolution, emphasizing the genesis of the revolutionary conflict, the revolution as a "republican revolution," the revolution's ideological and social results and their effect abroad, and the formation of the Constitution. Meets with HIST-451. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-652

The Era of the New Republic, 1789-1850 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

The new republic's political consolidation during its first critical decades; its physical, economic, and political transformation by continental expansion; the transportation and industrial revolutions and the creation of a mass democracy; and the first confrontations over slavery in 1832-1833 and 1848-1850. Meets with HIST-452. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-653

Civil War and Reconstruction (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Chronological coverage from the Compromise of 1850 to the final withdrawal of federal troops from the South in 1877. Includes antebellum reform, sectional conflict, black slavery, secession, and postwar racial and political problems. Political and social issues are emphasized, rather than a narrative of battles and skirmishes. Meets with HIST-453. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-654

The South since Reconstruction (3)

Course Level: Graduate

The theme is the South's struggle with the issues of integration, separation, and self-definition since the Civil War. Reconstruction and redemption, race relations, violence, the rise and fall of the "Solid South," and the "New South" of Jimmy Carter. Meets with HIST-454. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-655

Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1920 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

The course considers themes in the modernization of America: the rise of corporations and cities, the influx of immigrants from southern and eastern Europe, and the advent of the new diplomacy and imperialism. Also studies populism and progressivism. Meets with HIST-455. Usually offered alternate years.

 

HIST-656

Twentieth Century America (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Life in the twentieth century is different from all other periods of our past. To understand why requires an examination of the explosion of science and technology, the growth of government, America's increasing involvement in the world, the multiplication of protest and liberation movements, the new politics, and neo-Keynesian economics. Meets with HIST-456.

 

HIST-657

America between the Wars, 1919-1941 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Following a decade of stability and prosperity, the dislocations caused by the Great Depression disrupted the lives and shook the institutions of the American people, leading to unprecedented political and cultural experimentation. Emphasizing both the contrasts and continuities between the 1920s and 1930s, the course investigates the patterns of political, social, cultural, economic, and intellectual life during the interwar period, with special emphasis on the tensions between radical and conservative tendencies. Meets with HIST-457.

 

HIST-659

Topics in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality History (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Examines the changing definitions, perceptions, and uses of gender and sexuality in U.S. history. Rotating topics include women's suffrage, images of masculinity, and gay rights. Based on the assumption that gender and sexuality are historically-specific cultural constructs, special attention is paid to their intersection with race, class, and ethnicity. Meets with HIST-459. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-660

U.S. Foreign Relations, 1774-1918 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

The history of United States diplomacy (and other forms of international relations) from the Revolution to World War I. Focus on policymaking and makers; on such long-term issues such as unilateralism, imperialism, and neutrality; and on economics and ideology. Meets with HIST-460. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-661

U.S. Foreign Relations since 1918 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

The history of United States diplomacy (and other forms of international relations) since World War I. Focus on policymaking and makers; on such long-term issues as isolationism, unilateralism, and interventionism; on ideology, economics, and related domestic politics; and on growing U.S. attention to military and national security matters. Meets with HIST-461. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-662

America and the Cold War (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Focusing on the years 1945-1989, this course explores the international and domestic origins of the Cold War, its impact on American politics and culture, the rise of the national security state, and crises such as the Korean war, the Cuban missile crisis, and Vietnam. Meets with HIST-462. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-664

U.S. Presidential Elections (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This course reinterprets U.S. history from the perspective of the nation's quadrennial contests for national leadership. It shows how presidential elections both reflect and influence major trends and episodes of the American past. The course combines narrative history with political and economic models to present a comprehensive theory of American presidential elections. A portion of the course focuses on the current election cycle, with guest speakers contributing information and adding to analysis. Meets with HIST-464. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-667

Oral History (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This course presents the theory, practice, legal and ethical issues, and uses of oral history. Through field work, students gain interviewing, transcription, and analysis skills and studies the advantages and limitations of oral history as source material. Reading and case histories are drawn from modern U.S. history. Meets with HIST-467. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-668

Topics in Public History (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include history and public policy, media and history, regional and local histories, and historic sites. Some background in U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-468.

 

HIST-669

History of Medicine in the United States: from Smallpox to AIDS (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Health, disease, and medicine's role in American society and culture with a special focus on health dangers posed by industrialization, urbanization, and immigration. Disease and its social construction has been an important dimension of American culture and definitions of health and disease are important barometers of who we are as a people. Epidemics (including AIDS), the hospital, ethnicity, race, urban health care, controversies in medical ethics, and medical discoveries. Meets with HIST-469. Usually offered alternate springs.

 

HIST-670

Visual and Material Culture (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This course combines two interdisciplinary and often overlapping areas of study for examination by students of history: material and visual cultural studies. The course introduces students to historiography and cultural theory in both fields and examines methodologies for using visual and material sources to study American cultural and social history. Meets with HIST-470. Usually offered alternate springs.

 

HIST-671

Ideology, Culture, and American Politics (3)

Course Level: Graduate

How have American political leaders justified their objectives? How have popular beliefs and attitudes been reflected in the American political system? This course, concentrating on the twentieth century, explores the relationship between American political life on the one hand and ideas and popular persuasions on the other. Meets with HIST-471.

 

HIST-673

American Jewish History (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Today American Jewry constitutes the preeminent Diaspora Jewish community. This course traces its historical development by examining the waves of Jewish immigration to the United States and the institutions that American Jews created to sustain their community. Meets with HIST-473. Usually offered alternate springs.

 

HIST-676

U.S. Environmental History (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Environmental history introduces nature, including plants, animals, climate, weather, and soil, as a central aspect of its analysis. This course examines the role nature plays in North America's history from the breakup of Pangaea to the rise of the American lawn. The course further explores how humans have reshaped the continent's ecosystems over time. Meets with HIST-476. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-677

History in the Digital Age (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This course explores the impact of new information technologies on historical practices, focusing on research, teaching, presentations of historical materials, and changes in professional organization and discourse. Some background in U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-377. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-677

History and New Media (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This course explores the impact of new information technologies on historical practices, focusing on research, teaching, presentations of historical materials, and changes in professional organization and discourse. Some background in U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-477. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-678

Civil War Institute (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This week-long summer program introduces participants to the key causes and consequences of the war by exploring its remnants and remembrances in the Washington, D.C. area. The intensive program combines morning presentations and discussions with afternoon field trips. Sites include Harper's Ferry, Antietam, Arlington National Cemetery, Sherman and Grant Memorials, Howard University, Fort Stevens, Frederick Douglass Home, Ford's Theater, and a full-day trip to Richmond. Meets with HIST-478. Usually offered every summer.

 

HIST-679

Topics in African American History (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include American slavery, African American women, the civil rights movement, and race relations in the United States. Some background in U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-479.

 

HIST-685

Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Beyond (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Summer study trip to Japan in conjunction with the Nuclear Studies Institute. Focuses on Japanese wartime aggression, the human devastation wrought by the atomic bombings, current Japanese and international efforts to eliminate nuclear weapons, and the building of closer ties between the people of the United States and Japan. Participants hear first-hand accounts of atomic bomb survivors and Asian victims of Japanese atrocities, visit sites of historical and cultural significance, and attend commemorative events. Meets with HIST-485. Usually offered every summer.

 

HIST-690

Independent Study Project in History (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

HIST-691

Internship (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

 

HIST-696

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

HIST-720

Colloquium in Modern European History 1789-1900 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Covers major issues in European history from 1789 to 1900. Integrates political, social, cultural, intellectual, diplomatic, and military subjects and their historiography. The colloquium assumes basic knowledge of events. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-721

Colloquium in Modern European History since 1900 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Covers major issues in European history since 1900. Integrates political, social, cultural, intellectual, diplomatic, and military subjects and their historiography. The colloquium assumes basic knowledge of events. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

HIST-727

Colloquium in United States History I: to 1865 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

The course assumes the student's familiarity with factual data and concentrates on analyzing important historiographic disputes and developments in U.S. history to the end of the Civil War. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-728

Colloquium in United States History II: since 1865 (3)

Course Level: Graduate

The course assumes the student's familiarity with factual data and concentrates on analyzing important historiographic disputes and developments in U.S. history from 1865 to the present. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-729

Public History Seminar (3)

Course Level: Graduate

With HIST-730, this course is part of a two course sequence introducing students to ideas, debates, and best practices in the field of public history. The course introduces students to the historical origins of public history, the historiography and major paradigms in the field, and to debates about the public role of historians. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-730

Public History Practicum (3)

Course Level: Graduate

With HIST-729, this course is part of a two course sequence introducing students to ideas, debates, and best practices in the field of public history. The course introduces students to the best practices in both the interpretation of history in public venues and the management of heritage sites. Includes governance, ethics, interpretation, evaluation, exhibition development, and education. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-744

The Historian's Craft (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Focuses on historical theory, historical methodology, and differences in the various branches of history. Brings together graduate students with various specialties and interests and creates a common base of knowledge and experience. Usually offered every fall.

 

HIST-751

Graduate Research Seminar (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Repeatable for credit. Identification and development of research subjects; sources and their evaluation; research techniques and problems; and writing and argumentation. Students research and write substantial papers based largely on primary sources, with the aim of producing a paper suitable for submission to an academic journal or a professional conference. Usually offered every spring.

 

HIST-796

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

 

HIST-797

Master's Thesis Research (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Usually offered every term. May be taken SP/UP only.

 

HIST-799

Doctoral Dissertation Seminar (1-12)

Course Level: Graduate

Usually offered every term. May be taken pass/fail only.

 

HIST-898

Doctoral Continuing Enrollment (1-9)

Course Level: Graduate

Prerequisite: doctoral students with permission of program director.

 

HIST-899

Doctoral Dissertation

Course Level: Graduate

Prerequisite: doctoral students who have advanced to candidacy with permission of program director.

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