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    Battelle Tompkins, Room 237

    Rangel-Mullin, Rebecca
    Sr. Administrative Assistant

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Literature Courses

College Writing Courses

For current class offerings, times, and additional information, please visit the Office of the Registrar.

Please see also:

Lit Course Descriptions (Fall 2014)

WRTG 101: College Writing Seminar — section descriptions (Spring 2015)

 

Literature Courses

LIT-107: Creative Writing Across Genres FA1 (3)

This course guides students into the world of creative communication through generative writing assignments, in-class critiques, writing workshops and writerly appreciation of literary texts. Students explore multiple genres of writing including fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry, in preparation for upper-level Creative Writing workshops. Usually offered every term.


LIT-121: Rethinking Literature FA1 (3)

Topics vary by section. May be repeated for credit with different topic. The course focuses on a compelling idea or area of inquiry rendered in literature. Students interrogate a range of literary and cultural texts in order to deepen their understanding of the literary endeavor. Rotating topics include poetry and the world, desire and identity, human nature after Darwin, the culture of detective fiction, etc. Please see the current semester's course descriptions for an updated and changing list of topics. Usually offered every term.


LIT-125: Great Books that Shaped the Western World FA2 (3)

This course enriches students' knowledge and appreciation of Western civilization by familiarizing them with some of the most important literary texts in Western literature from Homer through the nineteenth century. In addition to studying these works for their literary artistry, the course addresses the cultural context of these works, the ethical issues they address and the pivotal roles they have played in Western society, and what it means to call a work "a classic." Usually offered every term.


LIT-146: Critical Approach to the Cinema FA1 (3)

Analysis of film content and style through screenings and substantial readings in aesthetic theory and film history. Also considers social issues, cultural artifacts, and forms of artistic expression. Usually offered every term.


LIT-150: Third World Literature FA3 (3)

An introduction to literature written by writers from the Third World: Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The emphasis is on contemporary fiction and the ways that this writing depicts cultural and political change brought about by the impact of outside forces. Usually offered every term.


LIT-194: Community Service-Learning Project (1)

May be taken pass/fail only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and Center for Community Engagement and Service.


LIT-196: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


LIT-202: Writing for Prospective Lawyers (3)

An advanced course in writing designed to hone the skills necessary to write legal briefs, memoranda, and agreements. Particular attention is paid to logic and argumentation. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: WRTG-100 and WRTG-101 or equivalent.


LIT-210: Survey of American Literature I (3)

A historical study of American writers and their contributions to the diversity of American literary forms and intellectual life, from the Puritan settlement to Dickinson and Whitman. Writers are appraised aesthetically, both individually and in cultural context. Usually offered every fall.


LIT-211: Survey of American Literature II (3)

A historical study of American writers and their contributions to the diversity of American literary forms and intellectual life, from post-Civil War to the present. Writers are appraised aesthetically, both individually and in a cultural context. Usually offered every spring.


LIT-215: Writers in Print/in Person FA1 (3)

Offers students the opportunity to study works by contemporary authors and then to continue their exploration of these works in meetings with the writers. Features locally and nationally prominent writers, including American University writing faculty. Usually offered every term.


LIT-220: Survey of British Literature I (3)

A historical exploration of a range of writers in the British tradition, from Chaucer through the eighteenth century. Writers are examined as individual artists and as representatives of their age. Usually offered every fall.


LIT-221: Survey of British Literature II (3)

A historical exploration of a range of writers in the British tradition, from the Romantic period through the twentieth century. Writers are examined as individual artists and as representatives of their age. Usually offered every spring.


LIT-225: African Literature FA1 (3)

This course looks at a range of fiction from across the African continent. The course examines the ways that African literature reacts to and records various crises that have shaped the continent including colonialism, civil war, structural adjustment, racism, AIDS, etc. but also moves beyond the rhetoric of crisis to highlight the "poetics of survival" that underpin much African literary production. Usually offered every fall.


LIT-232: Shakespeare FA1 (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. The course examines Shakespeare's artistic development, grappling with the issues of today while experimenting with different dramatic and poetic forms. Rotating topics include: Shakespeare and politics, philosophy, theatrical performance, queer theory, and Shakespeare's cultural and artistic legacy. Please see the current semester's course descriptions for an updated and changing list of topics. Usually offered every term.


LIT-235: African American Literature FA2 (3)

A survey of African-American literature beginning with the poet Phillis Wheatley and the slave narratives of the 1700s and concluding with Malcolm X and Toni Morrison. The emphasis is on the continuity of black writing within its historical and cultural contexts. Usually offered every spring.


LIT-240: Asian American Literature FA2 (3)

The recent explosion of Asian-American literature--defined as literature by writers of Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian, Pakistani, and Filipino descent living in North America--warrants close and historically-informed analysis. This course considers works by Asian-American writers in light of orientalism, issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and identity, and historical pressures such as immigration policies and independence movements. Usually offered alternate springs.


LIT-245: The Experience of Poetry FA1 (3)

Without dwelling on "professional" terminology and technique, the course aims to make poetry more accessible and enjoyable through reading, writing, and discussion. Students are asked to write some poetry along with traditional papers, but the poetry assignments are designed to reassure those who doubt their creativity. Usually offered every term.


LIT-246: Cinema and the Twentieth Century FA1 (3)

A historical study of cinema as an art form through the twentieth century, covering major cinematic developments in aesthetic, technological and cultural terms. Films are examined as both individual texts and within their historical and cultural contexts. Usually offered every spring.


LIT-250: Literature, Film and Globalization FA3 (3)

This course introduces cinematic and literary texts that highlight debates about the forms of globalization that link the world together in a single, if unequal, market. Students read films and novels both as texts that represent globalization and as objects that travel transnational circuits of consumption. Usually offered every term.


LIT-251: First-Year Seminar (3)

Topics vary by section. May be repeated for credit with different topic. For students considering further study of literature. Each seminar focuses in detail ad in depth on a single author's works, exploring various critical approaches within a broad historical, cultural, political, and philosophical context. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: LIT-107, LIT-121 or LIT-146. Open only to first-year students.


LIT-252: Survey of Literary Theory (3)

A survey of theoretical approaches to literature, covering major schools and movements. The course introduces a variety of critical methods, including New Criticism, structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, Marxism, etc. Usually offered alternate falls.


LIT-265Literature and Society in Victorian England FA2 (3)

The connections between literary works and their social context. The course is divided into significant cultural subjects, such as the effect of scientific advancement on society at large, how Victorians perceived themselves at home and at work, and how issues of political reform affected literary works. Readings include historical studies, as well as novels and poems. Usually offered every spring.


LIT-296: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


LIT-301: Advanced Composition (3)

Offers students development in advanced writing skills using contemporary theory and practice in argumentation, style, meta-analysis, process, and critical thinking. Usually offered every term.


LIT-308: Studies in Genre (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics examine expression in a variety of literary genres. Topics include sentimentalism and sensationalism, utopian literature, the gothic, and the epic. Usually offered every year.


LIT-309: Contemporary British Theater (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad London Semester. This course provides a survey of British theater through seminars, reading plays, and attendance at a variety of performances in and near London. Discussions include the influence of actors and directors, and the contributions of set, costume, and lighting design. Usually offered every term.


LIT-310: Major Authors (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Intensive study of the works of one or more important authors. Attention is paid to the evolution of the author's canon, to the effects of (and on) the literary context, to the relationship between works and biography, and to the historical and cultural context of the writer. Usually offered every year.


LIT-315: Topics in American Romanticism (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. American Romantic authors of the antebellum period reflected the effects of slavery, constraints on women, and materialism on the nation, and looked for the realization of a new age. Writers studied include Whitman, Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, Stowe, Poe, Sedgewick, Fuller, Douglass, and Jacobs. Usually offered every year.


LIT-316: Nineteenth Century American Novel (3)

Emphasis on literary evolution of a form as it expresses historical evolution of national consciousness. Novelists studied include Hawthorne and Melville. Usually offered every year.


LIT-318: Topics in American Realism (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Post-Civil War literary realism reflected a time of both great wealth and squalor, with striving for self-expression by those who were marginalized, including African Americans, Native Americans, and women. Writers studied include Mark Twain, William Dean Howells, Theodore Dreiser, Henry Adams, Edith Wharton, Kate Chopin, Sarah Orne Jewett, Henry James, Charles Chesnutt, Booker T. Washington, and W.E.B. Du Bois. Usually offered every other year.


LIT-321: Topics in American Modernism (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Modernism expressed a new consciousness of the United States as an urban nation and world power, pioneering advertising, mass culture, and avant-garde art. Authors include Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Eliot, Stevens, HD, Hughes, and Williams. Usually offered every year.


LIT-322: Topics in Contemporary American Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Topics in American fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction of the past forty years. Usually offered every year.


LIT-323: Ethnic Literatures of the United States (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. The old idea of the United States as a melting pot has given way to awareness of the unique and powerful contributions to the literature of the United States by Native Americans, African Americans, Chicano and Latino Americans, and Asian Americans. Topics vary across ethnic groups and genres. Usually offered every other year.


LIT-332: Shakespeare Studies (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. More than any other playwright in the Western tradition, Shakespeare is extolled for creating memorable dramatic characters and riveting plots, along with brilliant language and arresting stage techniques. Rotating topics include early plays, later plays, and Shakespeare on film. Usually offered every term.


LIT-334: Topics in Renaissance Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Some of the greatest art, poetry, and drama in the Western tradition flourished amidst the religious and political tumult of the Renaissance. Rotating topics include Renaissance drama, Renaissance poetry, and a survey of Renaissance literature (British or European). Usually offered every year.


LIT-337: Topics in Restoration and Enlightenment Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. In seventeenth and eighteenth century Britain new literary forms, such as the novel and the autobiography, responded to the far-reaching changes in philosophy, politics, and religion of the Restoration and Enlightenment. Rotating topics include Milton, Restoration drama, and the rise of the British novel. Usually offered every other year.


LIT-340: Topics in Nineteenth Century British and European Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics in British and European literature ranging from nineteenth century melodrama in different national traditions to the Victorian novel, Victorian poetry, French realism, and French Symbolist poetry. Usually offered every year.


LIT-341: Topics in Romantic Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. In the wake of complete social and political upheaval, eighteenth and nineteenth century Romantic writers questioned longstanding assumptions. Rotating topics include the Romantic imagination, the politics of poetry, and the Shelley circle. Usually offered every year.


LIT-343: Topics in British and European Modernism (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. European modernist vision and techniques, such as free verse and stream of consciousness, are some of the innovations owed to Modernism that have profoundly influenced the way we see, hear, and feelUsually offered every year.


LIT-346: Topics in Film (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include film and literature, national cinema, film genres, major filmmakers, and independent filmmakers. Usually offered every year.


LIT-347: Spain and Latin America through Literature and Film (3)

Through a survey of several different forms, contemporary Spanish and Latin American reality is presented in this course offered as part of the AU Abroad program in Madrid. It includes critical approaches to narrative textual discourses dealing with social structure and identity and explores the relation between literature and film showing Latin American countries as complex cultural arrangements in continuous redefinition.


LIT-350: Literature of Central Europe in the Twentieth Century (3)

Introduces students to the literary interrelations among the various national and ethnic groups of Central Europe including Bohemia, Austria, Germany, and Hungary, and their dependence on Russian and Scandinavian authors. Writers studied include Dostoyevsky, Kafka, Koestler, Kraus, Meyerink, Schnitzler, Werfel, and Zweig. Offered only in Prague. Usually offered every fall.


LIT-360: Topics in Medieval Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. The literature of the Middle Ages reflects a radically different world view in writings that capture human beings at their best and worst moments. Rotating topics include Chaucer, Dante, and a survey of medieval literature. Usually offered every year.


LIT-365: Mediterranean Literature (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad Madrid and the Mediterranean program. This course offers a review of the major Mediterranean world literary accomplishments of antiquity, the Renaissance, and the baroque, as well as contemporary Arab literature. Students become familiar with intrinsically Mediterranean topics such as epic travel, exile, and cross-fertilization among cultures, the works of Homer, Dante, and Cervantes and their trail of influence in modern literature and culture, as well as reading the work s of major authors of Lebanon, Egypt, Palestine, and Morocco. Usually offered every fall.


LIT-367: Topics in World Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics in a wide range of literature from around the world. Usually offered every year.


LIT-370: Topics in Women's and Gender Studies (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics dealing with influence of gender on literature, including women and literature and nineteenth-century American women's literature. Usually offered every year.


LIT-379: Mediterranean Cross-Cultural Cinema (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad Madrid and the Mediterranean program. Featuring a series of films, mostly produced in Mediterranean countries, which are a rich source for the study of inter cultural relations, this course studies the cinematic medium, not only as a data source, but as a language in itself. Different film traditions are analyzed in order to discover the type of stylistic conventions that vary from culture to culture, as well as cinema's potential for inter cultural communication. Usually offered every fall.


LIT-381: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including literature and sexuality, literature and the city, psychological approaches to literature, the culture of AIDS, the Holocaust, and literature and politics. Usually offered every year.


LIT-390: Independent Reading Course in Literature (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.


LIT-394: Community Service-Learning Project (1)

May be taken pass/fail only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and Center for Commu nity Engagement and Service.


LIT-396: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


LIT-400: Creative Writing: Fiction (3)

May be repeated for credit once with permission of instructor. A writing workshop with students reading their work aloud and commenting on one another's efforts. The instructor reserves the right to have the last word. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: LIT-107 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.


LIT-401: Creative Writing: Poetry (3)

May be repeated for credit once with permission of instructor. An intensive approach to the techniques of writing verse, followed by several weeks of workshop sessions in which students' poems receive responses from the entire class. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: LIT-107 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.


LIT-402: Creative Writing: Film Script (3)

May be repeated for credit once with permission of instructor. An introduction to writing developing stories for the screen. A study of the special contributions of the writer to film art. Screenings, reading, writing, and rewriting. Meets with LIT-702. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.


LIT-403: Creative Writing: Nonfiction (3)

May be repeated for credit once with permission of instructor. An intensive workshop in which students share their memoirs and personal essays, developing techniques in point of view, dialogue, and creating scenes. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: LIT-107.


LIT-405: Seminar on Translation (3)

Designed primarily for writers, this course introduces students to the international community of writers by providing approaches to and models for the translation of literary works as well as experience in translating. It is expected that students will learn about the use of their own language in the process. Fluency in another language is helpful but not required. Meets with LIT-705. Usually offered every spring.


LIT 422/622: Advanced Studies in Contemporary Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Advanced topics in fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction of all national traditions of the past forty years. Emphasis on research. Usually offered every year.


LIT 434/634: Advanced Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Some of the greatest art, poetry, and drama in the Western tradition flourished amidst the religious and political tumult of the Medieval and Early Modern eras. Rotating topics include medieval romance, Arthurian literature, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Renaissance drama, Renaissance poetry. Emphasis on research. Usually offered every year.


LIT 437/637: Advanced Studies in Restoration and 18th Century Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. In seventeenth and eighteenth century Britain new literary forms, such as the novel and the autobiography, responded to the far-reaching changes in philosophy, politics, and religion of the Restoration and Enlightenment. Rotating topics include Milton, Restoration drama, and the rise of the British novel. Emphasis on research. Usually offered every year.


LIT 440/640: Advanced Studies in 19th Century Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics in British and European literature ranging from nineteenth century melodrama in different national traditions to the Victorian or Romantic novel, Victorian or Romantic poetry, French realism, and French Symbolist poetry, the Romantic imagination, the politics of poetry, and the Shelley circle. Emphasis on research. Usually offered every year.


LIT 443/643: Advanced Studies in 20th Century Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include modernist fiction and poetry, the Harlem Renaissance, postmodernism, counterculture, experimental poetry. Emphasis on research.


LIT 446/646: Advanced Studies in Film (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include film and literature, national cinema, film genres, major filmmakers, and independent filmmakers. Emphasis on research. Usually offered every year.


LIT 467/667: Advanced Studies in World Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics in a wide range of literature from around the world. Emphasis on research. Usually offered every year. 


LIT-480: Senior Project in Literature (3)

This course is the second in the capstone sequence for literature majors. Students tap into their own intellectual curiosity and develop their research, analytical, and writing skills, culminating in a 25 page paper. Class meetings provide support and structure for work on the project and include faculty guest speakers and student presentations. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: LIT-498.


LIT 481/681: Advanced Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature(3)


Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics involving literature and sexuality, psychological approaches to literature, literature and politics and other approaches to literature through the lens of other disciplines. Emphasis on research. Usually offered every year.


LIT-490: Independent Study Project in Literature (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.


LIT-491: Practical Internship in Literature (3)

Practical work in writing and research for various agencies and publications, and apprentice teaching experience with private schools and diverse groups, including the Writing Center. Prerequisite: permission of adviser and department chair.


LIT-496: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


LIT-498: Senior Seminar in Literature: The Value of Literature (3)

This course is the first in the capstone sequence for literature majors. It addresses the following questions: Is literature separable from other forms of linguistic expression? Are there modes of interpretation and study unique to literature? Why has the assertion of literary value found expression in specifying a canon of particular works? Since art and literature are traditionally defined in terms of secondariness, either as reflection, mimesis, or as refinement, the course also addresses the issue of secondariness and marginalization in both literature and literary criticism. Usually offered every fall.


LIT-499: Honors, Senior Year (3)

Prerequisite: permission of department and University Honors program.


LIT-520: Theories and Methodologies (3)

This course introduces students to the theories necessary for the study of literature at the graduate level. It provides wide coverage of theoretical and critical issues in the field as well as diverse modes of pedagogy. Students learn to think self-consciously of their own theoretical and critical methodologies, and to participate in scholarly debates in the field. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: admission to M.A. in Literature or permission of instructor.


LIT-521: Reading in Genre: Poetry (3)

Overview of poetry from all significant literary periods; special attention paid to the history and forms of the genre. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: admission to M.A. in Literature or permission of instructor.


LIT-522: Reading in Genre: Drama (3)

Overview of drama from all significant literary periods; special attention paid to the history and forms of the genre. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: admission to M.A. in Literature or permission of instructor.


LIT-523: Reading in Genre: Novel (3)

Overview of the novel from all significant literary periods; special attention paid to the history and forms of the genre. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: admission to MA in Literature or permission of instructor.


LIT-524: Reading in Genre: Cinema (3)

Overview of cinematic textsl from all significant literary periods; special attention paid to the history and forms of the genre. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: admission to MA in Literature or permission of instructor.


LIT-590: Independent Reading Course in Literature (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.


LIT-596Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


LIT-608: Studies Genre (3)

Topics vary by section. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics examine expression in a a variety of literary genres. Topics include: sentimentalism and sensationalism, utopian literature, the gothic, and the epic. Usually offered every year.


LIT-681: Advanced Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature (3)

Topics vary by section. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include literature and sexuality, psychological approaches to literature, literature and politics, and other approaches to literature through the lens of other disciplines with emphasis on research. Usually offered every year.


LIT-690: Independent Study Project in Literature (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.


LIT-691: Graduate Internship (1-6)

Practical experience making use of students' writing and organizational skills. Required for M.F.A. candidates. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the department, and permission of instructor and department chair.


LIT-696Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.


LIT-700: Advanced Fiction Workshop (3)

May be repeated for credit, but not in the same term. A writing workshop with students reading their work aloud and commenting on one another's efforts. The instructor reserves the right to have the last word. Graduate students are expected to submit 12,500 words or more. Usually offered every term. Note: may be taken pass/fail only.


LIT-701: Advanced Poetry Workshop (3)

May be repeated for credit, but not in the same term. An intensive approach to the techniques of writing verse, followed by several weeks of workshop sessions in which students' poems receive responses from the entire class. Usually offered every term. Note: may be taken pass/fail only.


LIT-702: Creative Writing: Film Script (3)

May be repeated for credit, but not in the same term. An introduction to writing developing stories for the screen. A study of the special contributions of the writer to film art. Screenings, reading, writing, and rewriting. Meets with LIT-402. Usually offered every term.


LIT-703: Creative Storytelling Workshop (3)

Intensive workshop in storytelling and public performance. Includes creative improvisation; research, selecting, adapting, and performing traditional folktales; developing and performing personal and family stories; working with voice, sound effects, movement, gesture, and expression; editing stories for public performance; and coaching fellow tellers. Usually offered alternate springs and summers. Note: may be taken pass/fail only.


LIT-704: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Workshop (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Intensive critical workshop in writing memoirs and personal essays, emphasizing the development of the first-person voice. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: admission to MFA in Creative Writing program or permission of instructor. Note: may be taken pass/fail only.


LIT-705: Seminar on Translation (3)

Designed primarily for writers, this course introduces students to the international community of writers by providing approaches to and models for the translation of literary works as well as experience in translating. It is expected that students will learn about the use of their own language in the process. Fluency in another language is helpful but not required. Meets with LIT-405. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: admission to MFA in Creative Writing program or permission of instructor.


LIT-710: The Art of Literary Journalism (3)

A workshop in which the craft of reviewing books, plays, movies, TV, art, and music is practiced. Clear expository writing is the aim, tied to established criteria for sound critical approaches in journalism. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.


LIT-730Teaching Composition (3)

An introduction to the field of composition studies as well as the theory and practices of teaching academic writing. Students will wrestle with fundamental questions about writing and the personal, social and cultural dimensions of literacy; explore the nature of written discourse, the composing process, and learning; discuss issues and examine current approaches in teaching for contemporary composition classrooms. Usually offered every fall.


LIT-731: Teaching of Writing Practicum (3)

An internship with a College Writing Program instructor and ongoing study in composition studies to prepare for teaching academic writing. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: LIT-730 or permission of instructor.


LIT-732: Seminar in Literary Theory (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Provides a methodological basis for theoretical approaches to literary studies and focuses on critical issues in the study of literature. Topics include the history of aesthetics, contemporary literary theory, and feminist theory. Usually offered every fall.


LIT-733: Special Topics in Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Focuses on thematic and theoretical approaches to literature that traverse historical periods and national boundaries. Offered irregularly.


LIT-735: Seminar in Renaissance and Seventeenth Century Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Varies in content to cover English, European, or American colonial literature. Usually offered alternate falls.


LIT-736: Seminar in Eighteenth Century Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Varies in content to cover English, European, or American literature. Usually offered alternate springs.


LIT-737: Seminar in Nineteenth Century Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Varies in content to cover English, American, or world literature. Usually offered alternate falls.


LIT-738: Seminar in Twentieth Century Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Varies in content to cover English, American, or world literature. Usually offered alternate springs.


LIT-750: Folger Seminar in Renaissance and Eighteenth Century Studies (3)

An exploration of Renaissance and eighteenth century themes offered through the Folger Institute. Students draw on materials available in the Folger Library collections for their research. Usually offered every term. Students must apply directly to the Folger Institute to be admitted to the seminar; consult the department for more information. Prerequisite: permission of department.


LIT-793: Directed Research in Literature (3)

Students work closely with a faculty member on a scholarly article (20-35 pages) developed from a paper originally submitted for a graduate literature course, with the potential for publication in a scholarly journal. Students enhance their skills in conducting research and/or situating an idea within current scholarly dialogue in the field. Usually offered every term.


LIT-796: Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section. May be repeated with different topic. 


LIT-797: Master's Thesis Seminar (1-6)

May be taken SP/UP only.


College Writing Courses

WRTG-100 College Writing (3)

Develops students' skills in reading with understanding, summarizing and synthesizing information accurately, and writing correct, reasoned prose. Usually offered every term. Note: Completion of WRTG-100 and WRTG-101 with grades of C or better fulfills the university College Writing and Writing Proficiency Requirement.

WRTG-101 College Writing Seminar (3)

Continues the work begun in WRTG-100, stressing the student's abilities to construct extended arguments, to synthesize diverse materials, and to pursue library research. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: WRTG-100 or equivalent. Note: Completion of WRTG-100 and WRTG-101 with grades of C or better fulfills the university College Writing and Writing Proficiency Requirement.

WRTG-102 College Writing (3)

WRTG-102 is a specially designed version of WRTG-100. It is aimed at students whose language skills need special attention and has a required one-on-one conference with the course instructor. Usually offered every term. Note:Completion of WRTG-102 and WRTG-103 with grades of C or better fulfills the university College Writing and Writing Proficiency Requirement.

WRTG-103 College Writing Seminar (3)

WRTG-103 is a specially designed version of WRTG-101. It is aimed at students whose language skills need special attention and has a required one-on-one conference with the course instructor. Usually offered every term.Prerequisite: WRTG-102 or equivalent. Note: Completion of WRTG-102 and WRTG-103 with grades of C or better fulfills the university College Writing and Writing Proficiency Requirement.

WRTG-106 College Writing, Intensive (3)

Develops students' academic writing and research skills. Builds students' abilities to construct extended arguments and synthesize diverse materials. Emphasizes information literacy, including evaluating source material and making strategies and appropriate use of different sources. Usually offered every term. Note: Completion of WRTG-106 with a grade of C or better and an Advanced Placement English Language and Composition score of 4 or 5, or a Higher Level International Baccalaureate Examination score of 5 or higher fulfills the university College Writing and Writing Proficiency requirement.

WRTG-130 Honors English I (3)

Limited to first-year students by invitation. Usually offered every fall. Note: Completion of WRTG-130 and WRTG-131 with grades of C or better fulfills the university College Writing and Writing Proficiency Requirement.

WRTG-131 Honors English II (3)

Limited to first-year students by invitation. Usually offered every spring. Note: Completion of WRTG-130 and WRTG-131 with grades of C or better fulfills the university College Writing and Writing Proficiency Requirement.

WRTG-132 Honors English, Intensive (3)

Develops students' academic writing and research skills. Builds students' abilities to construct extended arguments and synthesize diverse materials. Emphasizes information literacy, including evaluating source material and making strategies and appropriate use of different sources. Usually offered every term. Note: Completion of WRTG-132 with a grade of C or better and an Advanced Placement English Language and Composition score of 4 or 5, score of 4 or 5, or a Higher Level International Baccalaureate Examination score of 5 or higher fulfills the university College Writing and Writing Proficiency Requirement. Open only to students in the University Honors Program.

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