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College Offering Wide Variety of Online Classes this Summer

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Registration has begun for a wide range of summer online courses. See below for course descriptions.

For more information and registration instructions, visit the Office of Registration website

 

AMST-200
American Dreams/American Lives

Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American culture, past and present. Emphasizes reading critically, thinking historically, practicing interdisciplinary, and acknowledging diversity. Students analyze and synthesize multiple kinds of primary sources (such as fiction, film, music, art) and disciplinary perspectives (sociology, economics, media criticism) to better appreciate the complexity of American life and culture.


AMST-240 FA4
Poverty & Culture

Students explore and debate rival theories about the causes and consequences of poverty. Why poverty occurs, why certain people are poor, how poverty influences family and community life, and how the poor respond to their situation and sometimes try to change it.


ANTH-110 FA3
Culture & Human Experience

People around the world create and use systems of symbols to express their identities as members of social groups. This course draws on diverse life-cycle experiences in tribal, state-level, and post-colonial societies to explore ways that both tradition and contact with other cultures contribute to the cultural pluralism of the contemporary world.


ANTH-225 FA1
Language & Human Experience

Examines language and its contribution to creativity, and how knowledge of language enriches human experience. Includes imagery and metaphor building through language; the effects of topic, speaking situation, and gender on creativity in tribal, state-level, and post-colonial contexts; and ways written language recasts and redefines human imagination.


ANTH-235 FA2
Early America: The Buried Past

An introduction to how archaeology reconstructs this country's historic past. The course looks at the way archaeologists use both artifacts and written records to tell the story of life in the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries. Emphasis on artifact and document interpretation, architecture, consumerism, African diaspora, and early non-Anglo settlers.


ANTH-250 FA5
Human Origins

The contributions that physical anthropology and archaeology can make toward an understanding of the origins and development of humankind. Includes genetics, the principles of evolution as applied to humans, the nonhuman primates and their behavior, human fossils, and the archaeology of the New and Old Worlds.


ATEC-101
Fund of Audio Technology

Students learn about the generation, transmission, and detection of sound; properties of sounds; history and aesthetics of electro-acoustic music and components; anatomy of audio equipment; professions in the field of audio technology; and the global structure of audio-related industries. Student apply basic recording and editing techniques in the completion of audio and audiovisual projects.


BIO-102
National Student Leadership Conference Topics

Instructional Method: Online. Biotechnology (1) Recent advances in the study of genome function reveal the fluidity and flexibility of the information encoded in our DNA. Gene structure, gene positioning within chromosomes, non-coding DNA sequences and the chemical structure of the nucleotides are all factors in how genetics impact our daily lives and development. Biotechnology is the collection of tools scientists use to manipulate and modify genomes for use in pharmaceuticals, medicine, agriculture and the criminal justice system. Techniques including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing, and molecular cloning allows us to isolate and characterize portions of DNA, so we may ultimately create new DNA sequences, new proteins and even entirely synthetic organisms. Students in this course obtain and analyze a variable gene (CDK) from their classmates using PCR and DNA sequencing. A course database of CDK gene sequences are organized and analyzed with tools and methods designed by each student based on their own hypotheses and experimental design. This project provides first-hand experience in the biotechnology fields of genomics and proteomics.


BIO-200 FA5
Structure & Functions of Human Body

The human organism as a paradigm for biological organization. The relationship between structure and function of organ systems. Disease processes in the context of normal physiology; social concerns from a biological perspective.


CHEM-205 FA5
The Human Genome

The human genome is the DNA book of life, containing information to create networks of proteins that construct a human being. The course discusses how the genome was read, how variants in DNA information are detected, and how interactions of networks of proteins are deciphered. Also, how this information changes views of disease, medical treatments, and our image of ourselves as a species. Can environmental factors override our genes (nurture vs. nature)? Substantial focus on ethical and social issues related to genetic testing, gene therapy, and our understanding of race.


CHEM-250 FA5
Criminalistics, Crime & Society

This course presents the unique and challenging application of science to law. The focus is on the scientific aspects of criminal investigations and judicial process. The course includes an overview of forensic science, the identification of illicit drugs, fibers, hairs, accelerants, gun shot residues, and explosives by chemical analysis, as well as DNA profiling. Emphasis is placed on the techniques of sampling a crime scene and the use of physical evidence to help solve cases. Students learn how to unlock the mystery of crimes through application of physical and chemical techniques.


ECON-100 FA4
Macroeconomics

Introduction to the basic principles of aggregate economic analysis. Includes measurement and determinants of national income, unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and business cycles. Topics also include historical perspectives, alternative approaches to economics, and current issues and controversies.


ECON-200 FA4
Microeconomics

Introduction to the analysis of markets and the behavior of different kinds of economic agents. Covers supply and demand, behavior of consumers and firms, competitive markets versus monopoly or oligopoly, income distribution, discrimination, and international trade.


ECON-363
Macroeconomics of Economic Development

Theoretical and empirical exploration of macroeconomic issues and policies in developing countries. Topics include exchange rates, monetary policy, fiscal policy, international trade, international financial flows, financial crises, structural adjustment, and related topics.


ECON-450
Growing Artificial Societies

Introduction to agent-based computational economics including computational models of economic growth, wealth inequality, the origins of cooperative behavior, and social dilemmas including the tragedy of the commons. This is a hands-on course, students examine, experiment with, and modify agent-based models, but no prior programming experience is required.


ECON-603
Intro to Economic Theory

An introduction to the major analytical tools of micro and macro economics, including models of employment, inflation, economic growth and development, international trade, the derivation of supply and demand, the operation of firms under perfect and imperfect competition, and the role of government in society. No credit toward degrees in the Department of Economics.


ECON-650
Growing Artificial Societies

Introduction to agent-based computational economics including computational models of economic growth, wealth inequality, the origins of cooperative behavior, and social dilemmas including the tragedy of the commons. This is a hands-on course, students examine, experiment with, and modify agent-based models, but no prior programming experience is required.


ECON-675
Gender Perspectives in Econonomic Analysis: Macro

This course explores the gender dimensions of economic life drawn from a rich body of studies and research on gender-aware analyses in macroeconomics, public finance, and international trade and finance. Using analytical models, empirical studies, case histories and ethnographic research, it examines feminist theories of economic growth, gender-aware macroeconomic models, gender and recession/crisis; gender analysis of fiscal policy and the practice of gender budgets; gender, trade, and investment; gender and credit markets; and gender-aware macroeconomic, trade, and investment policies.


EDU-205 FA4
Schools and Society

A multidimensional view of schools, teachers, and students. This social and intellectual foundation course serves as a basis for studying contemporary education and the issues of racism, sexism, finance, governance, innovations, and the social context of American education. The course includes lectures, discussion groups, cooperative learning, Internet activities, and independent projects.


EDU-285 FA3
Education for International Development

The conserving role of education as a socializing agent and the liberating role of education as an engine of change. Special attention is given to the multiple roles of education in social, economic, political, and human development in the developing world.


EDU-620
Theories Educational Psychology & Human Development

Surveys research literature in learning and human development with an emphasis on the role of educators as decision makers and change agents who are knowledgeable about diversity and multiculturalism. Emphasizes the role today's educators play on advancing knowledge about instructional technology, human relations, time management, principles of growth and development, and the processes of memory and cognition.


EDU-630
Foundations of Education

Exploration of philosophical, sociological, and political foundations of American education and inquiry into the role schools play in cultural production, maintenance, and transformation and what this means for diverse learners of all ages. Includes an examination of law and policies that affect children and families.


EDU-643
Foundations of Special Education for Exceptional Children

This survey course examines students with diverse learning needs and effective programs designed to provide equitable education for all students. Exceptionalities of students with regard to cognitive, behavioral, and psychological/social differences are the focus of study.


ENVS-496
Selected Topics: Non-Recurring

The Science of Science Writing (3) Science and medical writing requires grounding in a wide variety of disciplines and the ability to communicate with and through others. This course covers the fundamentals of science writing and communication, with an emphasis on overcoming the obstacles of effective science communication, as well as topics such as communicating risk, tailoring messages for children and other special populations, being persuasive, and constructing maximally effective messages for large lay audiences. Students gain an appreciation of how we generate, interpret, and work on information, as well as build skills necessary for successful careers in science/medical communication.


ENVS-696
Selected Topics: Non-Recurring

The Science of Science Writing (3) Science and medical writing requires grounding in a wide variety of disciplines and the ability to communicate with and through others. This course covers the fundamentals of science writing and communication, with an emphasis on overcoming the obstacles of effective science communication, as well as topics such as communicating risk, tailoring messages for children and other special populations, being persuasive, and constructing maximally effective messages for large lay audiences. Students gain an appreciation of how we generate, interpret, and work on information, as well as build skills necessary for successful careers in science/medical communication.


HIST-110 FA2
Renaissance & Revolution: Europe 1400-1815

Explores transformations in the culture, society, politics, and intellectual life of early modern Europe, such as the Italian Renaissance, the print revolution, the Reformation, European expansionism, New World slavery, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment and the French Revolution.


HIST-215 FA2
Societal Forces Shaped America

The history of race, class, and gender in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present. The focus is on how these forces existed and continue to exist as intersecting material realities and contributors to the social attitudes held by residents of the United States.


HIST-250 FA3
Empires & States in East Asia

This course examines the origins and history of multiple imperial traditions throughout East Asian history, including ancient China (origins to 221 B.C.); Chinese empires (221 B.C. to 1912); the Japanese empire (1895-1945); and modern East Asia (1600-present).


HPRM-200
Lifetime Health & Fitness

The physiological, sociological, and psychological aspects of fitness and health are introduced. Emphasis is placed on developing self-responsibility for total wellness. Students participate in fitness activities and classroom instruction and discussions.


HPRM-205 FA5
Introduction to Nutrition

This course addresses basic information about essential nutrients and their functions in the body as well as known and hypothesized relationships between diet and chronic disease. The course also addresses the U.S. government's nutrition guidelines, nutrition myths, food labeling, digestion, and weight management, and enables students to make informed decisions about their nutritional requirements and food choices.


HPRM-245 FA4
Multicultural Health

Provides basic understanding of gender and cultural issues affecting health. Emphasis is on health disparities and how gender and cultural indicators affect behavioral risk. The relationship between health and other factors such as religion, social class/socioeconomic status, acculturation, migration, and globalization are also studied.


HPRM-570
Strategies for Weight Control

This course is designed to address the strategies used to assist in reversing the obesity epidemic. Students gain an understanding of the trends of obesity, risk factors associated with being overweight, and chronic disease patterns. Further, strategies of proper weight management are explored on an individual and societal level, looking at current diet trends and evaluating their health implications.


LIT-121 FA1
Rethinking Literature

The Graphic Novel (3) This course teaches the fundamental processes of literary interpretation through the analysis of graphic novels. Students will learn and practice the specialized approaches of literary and cultural studies to find and assess meaning in these unique, popular, and increasingly "literary" texts. Texts considered include Watchmen, Fun Home, and Superman: Red Son.


LIT-146 FA1
Critical Approach to Cinema

Analysis of film content and style through screenings and substantial readings in aesthetic theory and film history. Also considers social issues, cultural artifacts, and forms of artistic expression.


MATH-220
Bridge to Calculus II

This course prepares students who have taken MATH-211 Applied Calculus I to continue on to MATH-222 Calculus II. Material covered includes the study of trigonometric functions, limits and continuity, and the differentiation and integration of a variety of functions, with a focus on mathematical rigor and algebraic proficiency.


PERF-200 FA1
Dance as an Art Form

A survey of dance as an artistic, social, and cultural form. Students discover the diverse ways dance represents and reflects society's experiences and values. Through lectures, readings, written work, performances, movement labs, and choreography/performance assignments students develop an understanding of aesthetics, function, and expression in dance.


PERF-220 FA1
Reflections of American Society on Stage

Examines artistic and cultural developments and societal phenomena as reflected in stage performance throughout the history of the United States. By reading plays as well as viewing productions linked to important historical, artistic, cultural, and political movements and events, students investigate and analyze the relationships between the creative artists, their produced works, and the societal contexts within which they originated.


PERF-296
Selected Topics: Non-Recurring

Music Composition (3) This online course is designed for students of all levels who want to try their hand at composing music. Projects cover songwriting, film scoring, video games, commercial branding, classical instrumental music, experimental music, and other genres based on students' interests and levels of proficiency. Students use a variety of software applications as well as live instruments to create, record, and disseminate original works. In addition to composing music following aesthetically principled guidelines, students examine musical works from across the stylistic spectrum in order to understand concepts that cut across musical idioms, such as tension/resolution, text setting, arranging, and musical form. Some musical experience is preferable, but is not required.


PERF-320
History of Rock Music

A stylistic examination of rock music from its origins to the present. Movements studied within a context of culture and society include blues, R&B, rockabilly, the folk revival, soul, doowop, the Motown sound, beach music, British rock, acid rock, hard rock, metal, disco, punk, grunge, and hip-hop.


PERF-477
Museum Management

This course explores major issues in museum management, including current thinking on museology, technological issues affecting visual arts management, the balance between curating, education, and public programs, and the changing role of museum directors. The course also addresses ethical issues concerning looting and repatriation and earned income activities in museums.


PERF-677
Museum Management

This course explores major issues in museum management, including current thinking on museology, technological issues affecting visual arts management, the balance between curating, education, and public programs, and the changing role of museum directors. The course also addresses ethical issues concerning looting and repatriation and earned income activities in museums.


PSM-601
The Science of Science Writing

Science and medical writing requires grounding in a wide variety of disciplines and the ability to communicate with and through others. This course covers the fundamentals of science writing and communication, with an emphasis on overcoming the obstacles of effective science communication, as well as topics such as communicating risk, tailoring messages for children and other special populations, being persuasive, and constructing maximally effective messages for large lay audiences. Students gain an appreciation of how we generate, interpret, and work on information, as well as build skills necessary for successful careers in science/medical communication.


PSYC-115 FA5
Psychology as Natural Science

Through lectures and discussion, students are introduced to the many experimental questions addressed in psychology, e.g., environmental and genetic factors in behavior, biological bases of behavior, sensations and perception, conditioning and learning, memory and cognition, and drug use and abuse, as well as to the specific methods used in psychological research and the general research approaches used in science.


PSYC-116 FA5
Psychology as Natural Science Lab

Through laboratory experiments and simulations, students are exposed to the various techniques, procedures, and designs used in the study of behavior.


PSYC-315
Self-Management

Principles of cognitive-behavioral self-control for achievement of personal goals. Self-management research is reviewed in weight loss, studying, self-esteem, giving up smoking, drug addiction, depression, time management, and enjoying oneself. Students conduct self-modification projects in group settings.


PSYC-420
Adolescent Psychology

Study of adolescence as a period of transition. Includes research and theory on hormonal, emotional, social, and cognitive development in adolescence. The influence of peer pressure, need for self-individuation, and problems of adolescence are also considered.


PUBH-110 FA4
Introduction to Public Health

This introductory course explores the science behind public health and the role government plays to keep the population healthy. The determinants of health and disease are discussed along with interventions such as the healthcare system, public health system, laws, and taxation that address these public health issues.


SOCY-110 FA3
Views from the Global South

Introduction to the sociology of the Global South through study of the works of its own intellectuals and political leaders. Reflections on the development of the "Third World" and critical engagement with the dilemmas of and contemporary issues facing the Global South. The course links texts to their context.


SOCY-150 FA4
Global Sociology

An introduction to sociology that focuses on the process of global social change as a critical factor in understanding contemporary societies. It emphasizes macrosociology (the study of large organizations and whole societies) and the creation of today's global society, including similarities and differences within it. Two major themes - modernization and globalization - are emphasized and their implications for individuals, groups, communities, societies, and governments are explored.


SOCY-210 FA4
Power, Privilege & Inequality

Race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and age are key factors in systematic marginalization and inequality. This course examines how some people suffer from inequalities while others benefit from them. It explores how power, privilege, and inequality are maintained through a range of social institutions and daily social interactions. It also cultivates intellectual insight and personal agency.


SOCY-350
Social Problems in Changing World

Sociological perspectives on the construction of social problems in a changing world. Focus on analysis of contrasting views and solutions for such conditions as global inequality, environmental degradation, population growth, inequalities based on economic class, race, gender, sexual orientation, and age, and institutional crises involving families, education, health care, crime, and justice.


SOCY-552
Sociology of Popular Culture

Popular culture is an increasingly central part of people's lives. This course acquaints students with major sociological theories of popular culture and applies them to areas including music, films, mass media, race, identity, novels, love, and sex.


SPAN-210 FA3
Latin America: History, Art, Literature

Latin America's history through literary texts, films, and documentaries, and other artistic representations. Analysis of how the Latin, African, and indigenous cultural heritages have combined to produce a unique culture. Usually offered every term. Taught in English.


SPAN-450
Spanish Civilization I: Spain

A study of the geography, history, arts, and literature of Spain from its very diverse origins to the present.


SPAN-456
Spanish Topics

History, Culture and Society in Latin America Cinema (3) This course provides a broad panorama of Latin American cinema as a means of approaching and understanding Latin American societies and cultures. The course combines the viewing and studying of films with some historical background. Students watch and discuss the assigned films and write a journal on a weekly basis. Readings give both insight into the films and provide the social, political, cultural, and historical context in which those films were produced.


SPAN-458
Intro to Spanish Translation

An introduction to the methods, techniques, and problems involved in translating Spanish into English. Emphasis is on translating general material, with some consideration of the translation of specialized material.


SPAN-656
Spanish Topics

History, Culture and Society in Latin America Cinema (3) This course provides a broad panorama of Latin American cinema as a means of approaching and understanding Latin American societies and cultures. The course combines the viewing and studying of films with some historical background. Students watch and discuss the assigned films and write a journal on a weekly basis. Readings give both insight into the films and provide the social, political, cultural, and historical context in which those films were produced.


SPAN-658
Intro to Spanish Translation

An introduction to the methods, techniques, and problems involved in translating from Spanish to English. Emphasis is on translating general material, with some consideration of the translation of specialized material.


TEFL-615
Teach Reading/Writing in EFL

This course offers an overview of the concepts and practical skills that are needed for English as a foreign language (EFL) learners to acquire literacy and more advanced reading and writing skills in English. Students learn methods and strategies for planning, implementing, and assessing reading and writing instruction for all levels of EFL, from pre-literacy to academic skills. Specific topics include content-based instruction, vocabulary development, beginning reading skills (phonemic awareness and phonics), reading fluency, academic literacy, the writing process, error correction, and reading and writing assessment. Students are required to tutor at least one English language learner (of any age or proficiency level) in reading and writing.


TESL-400
Principles of Linguistics

Introduction to scientific study of language with emphasis on current linguistic trends. Foundations for further study in linguistics and methodology of language teaching.


TESL-401
English Language Teaching I

Introduction to theories and principles of English language teaching, language acquisition, and a review of various methods and approaches used in language teaching, leading to an understanding of the development of the communicative approach. Provides opportunities for peer teaching and requires observation of English language classes, along with tutoring or teaching of English to non-native speakers.


TESL-402
English Language Teaching II

Focuses on evaluation and development of lesson plans and teaching materials designed to teach grammar, language functions, speaking, reading, listening, and writing skills within a communicative approach. Also addresses various aspects of classroom management. Provides opportunities for peer teaching and requires observation of English language classes, along with tutoring or teaching of English to non-native speakers.


TESL-600
Principles of Linguistics

Introduction to scientific study of language with emphasis on current linguistic trends. Foundations for further study in linguistics and methodology of language teaching.


TESL-601
English Language Teaching I

Introduction to theories and principles of English language teaching, language acquisition, and a review of various methods and approaches used in language teaching, leading to an understanding of the development of the communicative approach. Provides opportunities for peer teaching and requires observation of English language classes, along with tutoring or teaching of English to non-native speakers.


TESL-602
English Language Teaching II

Focuses on evaluation and development of lesson plans and teaching materials designed to teach grammar, language functions, speaking, reading, listening, and writing skills within a communicative approach. Also addresses various aspects of classroom management. Provides opportunities for peer teaching and requires observation of English language classes, along with tutoring or teaching of English to non-native speakers.


TESL-623
Second Language Acquisition

Theories of second language acquisition and how they relate to trends in society and in education and related disciplines. Current theory in cognitive and affective domains as it relates to second-language learning.


TESL-627
Cultural Issues ESL/EFL Classroom

Coverage of the principles of intercultural communication and discourse-oriented models for analyzing cross-cultural interactions. Within this framework, the course considers approaches to enhancing the cultural dimension of ESL/EFL instruction with an emphasis on using and developing various types of cultural training techniques.


WRTG-100
College Writing

Develops students' skills in reading with understanding, summarizing and synthesizing information accurately, and writing correct, reasoned prose.


WRTG-101
College Writing Seminar

Continues the work begun in WRTG-100, stressing the student's abilities to construct extended arguments, to synthesize diverse materials, and to pursue library research.