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Philosophy & Religion Department Calendar

Important Dates

February 18, 2014

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After FEBRUARY 18

Students interested in pursuing a philosophy degree are invited to participate in a panel discussion with alumni, faculty, and students of the Department on February 19 from 6:30-8:00 p.m. in the Batelle-Tompkins Atrium. Receive career-related advice from individuals who have graduated with a degree in this field. Panelists include Casey Nitsch, proposal manager, The Arc; Myron Long, principal, …more

Type: Panel Discussion

Host: Philosophy & Religion

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Please join the Department of Philosophy and Religion for its 55th Annual Bishop Hurst Lecture. This year's lecturer is Roger T. Ames, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Hawai'i.

Type: Lecture/Speaker

Host: Philosophy & Religion

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Please join us for the Annual Harold A. and Doris G. Durfee Lecture. This year's guest speaker is Slavica Jakelic, Assistant Professor of Humanities and Social Thought, Valparaiso University, and Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, University of Virginia.

Please see more info about Professor Jakelic and this year's lecture at the Durfee Lectures page.

Type: Lecture/Speaker

Host: Philosophy & Religion

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A lecture by Owen Flanagan, Duke University.

Buddhism appeals to many secular Westerners because it seems naturalistic, e.g., friendly to secular philosophy, secular values and science. But is this so? Can we make sense of Buddhism apart from such notions as karma, rebirth, nirvana, no-self, and emptiness and, if not, can these notions be tamed and naturalized?

Type: Lecture/Speaker

Host: Philosophy & Religion

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A lecture by Eric S. Nelson, University of Massachusetts Lowell and Hong Kong University of Technology and Science:

Recent works have argued for a phenomenological account of Buddhism and the relevance of classical phenomenology to interpreting Buddhist philosophy. In this paper, I examine the extent to which Buddhism can be understood as phenomenological by considering whether: (1) the …more

Type: Lecture/Speaker

Host: Philosophy & Religion

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