Expand AU Menu

WLC | Courses

For current class offerings, times, and additional information, please see:
AU Registrar Schedule of Classes.

 

Please use the jump-links below or browse this page for course descriptions in the following areas:

Arabic Courses

Chinese Courses

French Courses

German Courses

Hebrew Courses

Italian Courses

Japanese Courses

Korean Courses

Portuguese Courses

Russian Courses

Spanish Courses

TESOL Courses

 

Arabic Courses

ARAB-102: Arabic Elementary I (4)

Introduction to modern standard Arabic used in formal situations, meetings, instruction in schools and universities around the Arab world, and the media. The phonology and script of the language, important syntactic structures, morphology, understanding simple material including frequent structural patterns and vocabulary. Usually offered every fall.

ARAB-103: Arabic Elementary II (4)

Continuation of ARAB-102. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ARAB-102 or equivalent.

ARAB-116: Colloquial Moroccan Arabic (3)

Offered as part of the AU abroad program in Rabat, Morocco. Moroccan Arabic is a blend of Arabic, Spanish, and French. It is regarded as a dialect, and generally not written. This elementary-level course covers basic functions and survival situations. Usually offered every term.

ARAB-126: Beginning Arabic I (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad program in Rabat, Morocco, this course develops mastery of Arabic orthographic and sound systems, control of basic vocabulary and grammar in Modem Standard Arabic, and basic cultural concepts embedded in the language. Focus is on all five linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture). The course also incorporates greetings, introductions, asking for directions, describing immediate surroundings, asking for prices, etc. Usually offered every term.

ARAB-127: Beginning Arabic II (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad program in Rabat, Morocco, this course further develops mastery of Arabic orthographic and sound systems, control of basic vocabulary and grammar in Modem Standard Arabic, and basic cultural concepts embedded in the language. The course also incorporates verb conjunctions, including past and imperfect tenses, verbal nouns, negation, numbers, telling time, verb roots, using the dictionary, etc. Usually offered every term.

ARAB-202: Arabic Intermediate I (4)

Further practice in conversation; acquisition of new grammatical structures and vocabulary. Includes cultural subjects related to customs, history, geography and literature. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ARAB-103 or equivalent.

ARAB-203: Arabic Intermediate II (4)

Continuation of ARAB-202. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ARAB-202 or equivalent.

ARAB-226: Second Level Arabic I (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad program in Rabat, Morocco, this course further develops mastery of Arabic orthographic and sound systems, control of intermediate vocabulary and grammar in Modern Standard Arabic, and basic cultural concepts embedded in the language. Focus is on all five linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture). The course covers various forms of nouns and verbs for different uses. The course also incorporates authentic reading passages from which vocabulary and structure are drawn so that students use their grammatical skills to construct meaning. Emphasis is placed on social, historical, literary, and cultural issues. Usually offered every term.

ARAB-227: Second Level Arabic II (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad program in Rabat, Morocco, this course further develops mastery of Arabic orthographic and sound systems, control of intermediate vocabulary and grammar in Modern Standard Arabic, and basic cultural concepts embedded in the language. Focus is on all five linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture). The course covers sentence structure and reading comprehension. The course also incorporates authentic reading passages from which vocabulary and structure are drawn so that students use their grammatical skills to construct meaning. Emphasis is placed on social, historical, literary, and cultural issues. Usually offered every term.

ARAB-302: Advanced Arabic I (3)

This course introduces elements in the more advanced grammatical structures of Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) using a functional approach, and helps students develop skills in literary genres necessary for understanding authentic readings and discourse. Promotes the active use of MSA by using literary and culturally authentic selections of texts. Emphasis is on the development of effective application of thematic contexts from readings, and developing accuracy in written and oral communication. The course reviews and reinforces previously acquired grammatical structures, and expands vocabulary through extensive practice and analysis of MSA style from literary, political, social, and economic aspects of Arab culture and language. Prerequisite: ARAB-203 or equivalent.

ARAB-303: Advanced Arabic II (3)

Continuation of ARAB-302. Prerequisite: ARAB-302 or equivalent.

ARAB-326: Third Level Arabic I (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad program in Rabat, Morocco, this course develops advanced mastery of Arabic, control of vocabulary and grammar in Modern Standard Arabic, and cultural concepts embedded in the language. Focus is on all five linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture). The course also incorporates authentic reading passages that address a range of topics including politics, society, religion, and literature, to enable students to strength their reading skills and increase vocabulary acquisition, refine and expand knowledge of sentence structure and the Arabic verb system, as well as exposing students to writers from across the Arab world. Usually offered every term.

ARAB-327: Third Level Arabic II (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad program in Rabat, Morocco. Continuation of ARAB-326. This course develops advanced mastery of Arabic, control of vocabulary and grammar in Modern Standard Arabic, and cultural concepts embedded in the language. Focus is on all five linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture). The course also incorporates authentic reading passages that address a range of topics including politics, society, religion, and literature, to enable students to strength their reading skills and increase vocabulary acquisition, refine and expand knowledge of sentence structure and the Arabic verb system, as well as exposing students to writers from across the Arab world. Usually offered every term.

ARAB-396: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

ARAB-425: Survey of Arab Civilizations and Culture (3)

This course explores the historical, cultural, political, and intellectual developments within the twelve centuries of Arab and Ottoman civilizations, beginning with the seventh century Umayyad Empire to the nineteenth century renaissance of Arabism, and assesses and analyses the underlying factors influencing the Arab social and literary revival. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ARAB-303.

ARAB-426: Arabic Topics (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Topics taught in Arabic include media Arabic; Levantine Arabic; and reading and translation of sociopolitical texts. Emphasis is on vocabulary expansion through study of idioms and vernaculars, usage of thematic expressions, and patterns of regional discourse. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ARAB-303.

 

Chinese Courses

CHIN-112: Chinese, Elementary I (5)

Prepares students to function in everyday situations in the Chinese-speaking world. Focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Usually offered every fall.

CHIN-113: Chinese, Elementary II (5)

Continuation of CHIN-112. Prerequisite: CHIN-112 or equivalent. Usually offered every spring.

CHIN-212: Chinese, Intermediate I (5)

Refinement of basic language skills in a cultural context. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures and further development of communicative skills. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: CHIN-113 or equivalent.

CHIN-213: Chinese, Intermediate II (5)

Continuation of CHIN-212. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: CHIN-212 or equivalent.

CHIN-312: Advanced Chinese I (3)

This course promotes the active use of Chinese in culturally authentic contexts. Emphasis on the development of fluency and accuracy in oral and written communication. Includes social, economic, and political aspects of Chinese culture. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: CHIN-213 or equivalent.

CHIN-313: Advanced Chinese II (3)

Continuation of CHIN-312. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: CHIN-312 or equivalent.

 

French Courses

FREN-122: French, Elementary I (4)

Prepares students to function in everyday situations in the French-speaking world. Focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Designed for students with no prior experience with French. Usually offered every fall and summer.

FREN-123: French, Elementary II (4)

Continuation of FREN-122. Usually offered every spring and summer. Prerequisite: FREN-122 or equivalent.

FREN-222: French, Intermediate I (4)

Refinement of basic language skills in a cultural context. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures and further development of communicative skills. Content focuses on cultural patterns in the French-speaking world. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: FREN-123 or equivalent.

FREN-223: French, Intermediate II (4)

Continuation of FREN-222. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: FREN-222 or equivalent.

FREN-224: Living in French (1)

Part of the AU Abroad Program in Brussels, the course focuses on various aspects of life in Belgium and the experiences students encounter during the program. The primary objective is to improve oral communication and aural comprehension skills. Includes social, political, and economic aspects of the Belgium culture. Usually offered every fall and spring.

FREN-244: Second Level French (3)

Offered as part of the AU abroad program in Rabat, Morocco, this intensive course builds on students' acquired mastery of French at the elementary level (equivalent to one year of French). In addition to lectures and exercises in class and homework, it also includes lab drills, as well as challenging opportunities to practice French in daily life with French-speaking neighbors, friends, and fellow students. Students use and hone their linguistic skills in daily practice. They also enhance their skills in French reading, listening, oral, and writing comprehension in a number of environments, including cultural and sports events at the university, host-family stays, educational field trips, and other travels in Morocco. All these experiences are integrated through weekly assignments, in-class oral expression periods, and journal writing. Usually offered every term.

FREN-296: Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

FREN-322: Advanced French I (3)

Promotes the advanced active use of French in culturally authentic contexts. Emphasis on the development of fluency and accuracy in oral and written communication. Designed for students who have completed the intermediate level. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: FREN-223 or equivalent.

FREN-323: Advanced French II (3)

Continuation of FREN-322. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: FREN-322 or equivalent.

FREN-326: French Topics (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics taught in French include political life, the role of women, French politics, France today, French cinema, advanced French translation, etc. Usually offered every term. Meets with FREN-626. Prerequisite: FREN-323 or permission of instructor.

FREN-328: French Translation: Concepts and Practice (3)

An introduction to the methods, techniques, and problems involved in translating from French into English. Emphasis is on the practice of translating general material with some consideration of the translation of specialized material. Introduction to the field of translation as a profession. Usually offered every fall. Meets with FREN-628. Prerequisite: FREN-323 or permission of instructor.

FREN-344: Third Level French (3)

Offered as part of the AU abroad program in Rabat, Morocco, this intensive course builds on students' acquired mastery of French at the intermediate level (equivalent to two years of French). In addition to lectures and exercises in class and homework, it also includes lab drills, as well as challenging opportunities to practice French in daily life with French-speaking neighbors, friends, and fellow students. Students use and hone their linguistic skills in daily practice. They also enhance their skills in French reading, listening, oral, and writing comprehension in a number of environments, including cultural and sports events at the university, host-family stays, educational field trips, and other travels in Morocco. All these experiences are integrated through weekly assignments, in-class oral expression periods, and journal writing. Usually offered every term.

FREN-430: Style et Syntaxe du Francais (3)

This course is designed to teach students to analyze literary texts and comment on them with clarity and insight. It also attunes students to the nuances of the written language and teaches them the intricacies of composition writing. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: two French courses beyond FREN-323 Advanced French II or permission of instructor.

FREN-431: Civilisation Francaise I (3)

France from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution. Survey of political, social, and economic developments, emphasizing the differences between the culture des elites and culture du peuple, as seen through primary sources. Meets with FREN-631. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: FREN-323.

FREN-432: Civilisation Francaise II (3)

France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Study of the nouveau regime, the effects of the French revolutions on the social classes and their mental structures. Emphasis on the difference between the culture des elites and culture du peuple. Meets with FREN-632. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: FREN-323.

FREN-433: French Topics (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics taught in French including French politics; French society; French cinema; the Francophone novel; the short story in the Francophone world; Algerian colonization and decolonization; autobiography; cinema, literature, and society; humor and irony in French literatutre; French perception of America; etc. Usually offered every term. Meets with FREN-633. Prerequisite: FREN-323 or permission of instructor.

FREN-434: French Translation: Concepts and Practice (3)

An introduction to the methods, techniques, and problems involved in translating from French into English. Emphasis is on the practice of translating general material with some consideration of the translation of specialized material. Introduction to the field of translation as a profession. Usually offered every fall. Meets with FREN-634. Prerequisite: FREN-323 or permission of instructor.

FREN-435: French Translation Workshop (3)

This course is offered in tandem with FREN-434. Less emphasis is placed on theory and more time is given to systematic translation practice. Texts are selected from a wide variety of sources that offer examples of journalistic and literary language, as well as the more specialized terminology of commerce, technology and law. Meets with FREN-634. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: FREN-323 or permission of instructor.

FREN-436: Le Francais Commercial (3)

Advanced language course focusing on business expressions and terminology intended to prepare students for the Certificat Pratique examination offered by the Paris Chamber of Commerce. Emphasis on written and oral skills. Students learn to comprehend texts related to advertising, agriculture, banking, insurance, etc. and to write business letters and reports in French. Meets with FREN-636. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: FREN-323 or permission of instructor.

FREN-437: Les Registres du Francais (3)

An introduction to the cultural levels of the French language--colloquial, standard, formal, and familiar--and to the differences between spoken and written French. Also includes study of literary prose, versification, dialects, and aspects of selected technical vocabularies. Designed for students who wish to understand the intricacies of the French language. Meets with FREN-637. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: FREN-323 or permission of instructor.

FREN-480: Senior Capstone: Concept of the City (3)

This senior capstone course celebrates students' functional French language abilities and cultural competence through the comparison and contrast of the historical, political, literary, and cultural trends of four major urban epicenters (Berlin, Buenos Aires, Paris, and St. Peters burg) from a variety of perspectives and genres. Taught in English, students write their final research papers in French. Prerequisite: senior standing and French Studies major.

FREN-496: Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

FREN-628: French Translation: Concepts and Practice (3)

An introduction to the methods, techniques, and problems involved in translating from French into English. Emphasis is on the practice of translating general material with some consideration of the translation of specialized material. Introduction to the field of translation as a profession. Meets with FREN-328. Usually offered every fall.

FREN-630: Style et Syntaxe du Francais (3)

This course is designed to teach students to analyze literary texts and comment on them with clarity and insight. It also attunes students to the nuances of the written language and teaches them the intricacies of composition writing. Meets with FREN-430. Usually offered alternate falls.

FREN-631: Civilisation Francaise I (3)

France from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution. Survey of political, social, and economic developments, emphasizing the differences between the culture des elites and culture du peuple, as seen through primary sources. Meets with FREN-631. Meets with FREN-431. Usually offered alternate falls.

FREN-632: Civilisation Francaise II (3)

France in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Study of the nouveau regime, the effects of the French revolutions on the social classes and their mental structures. Emphasis on the difference between the culture des elites and culture du peuple. Meets with FREN-432. Usually offered alternate springs.

FREN-633: French Topics (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics taught in French including French politics; French society; French cinema; the Francophone novel; the short story in the Francophone world; Algerian colonization and decolonization; autobiography; cinema, literature, and society; humor and irony in French literatutre; French perception of America; etc. Usually offered every term. Meets with FREN-433.

FREN-634: French Translation: Concepts and Practice (3)

An introduction to the methods, techniques, and problems involved in translating from French into English. Emphasis is on the practice of translating general material with some consideration of the translation of specialized material. Introduction to the field of translation as a profession. Meets with FREN-434. Usually offered every fall.

FREN-635: French Translation Workshop (3)

This course is offered in tandem with FREN-634. Less emphasis is placed on theory and more time is given to systematic translation practice. Texts are selected from a wide variety of sources that offer examples of journalistic and literary language, as well as the more specialized terminology of commerce, technology and law. Meets with FREN-435. Usually offered every spring.

FREN-636: Le Francais Commercial (3)

Advanced language course focusing on business expressions and terminology intended to prepare students for the Certificat Pratique examination offered by the Paris Chamber of Commerce. Emphasis on written and oral skills. Students learn to comprehend texts related to advertising, agriculture, banking, insurance, etc. and to write business letters and reports in French. Meets with FREN-436. Usually offered alternate falls.

FREN-637: Les Registres du Francais (3)

An introduction to the cultural levels of the French language--colloquial, standard, formal, and familiar--and to the differences between spoken and written French. Also includes study of literary prose, versification, dialects, and aspects of selected technical vocabularies. Designed for students who wish to understand the intricacies of the French language. Meets with FREN-437. Usually offered alternate falls.

FREN-696: Selected Topics: Non-Recurring

A study of French novelistic trends after existentialism, the absurd, and the nouveau roman. Some writers play with the instability of language while framing their fiction in a new multicultural French society, while others examine historical moments and personal fate in the aftermath of World War II. Readings include works by Ajar, Laine, Modiano, Perec, Pennac, Yourcenar, Tournier, and others. Meets with FREN-496 001.

FREN-702: Seminar in French Studies (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Reports and critical discussion of research papers on French literature. Usually offered every term.

 

German Courses

GERM-132: German, Elementary I (4)

Prepares students to function in everyday situations in the German-speaking world. Focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. One class per week emphasizes oral communication. Designed for students with no prior experience with German. Usually offered every fall.

GERM-133: German, Elementary II (4)

Continuation of GERM-132. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: GERM-132 or equivalent

GERM-232: German, Intermediate I (4)

Refinement of basiclanguage skills in a cultural context. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures and further development of communicative skills. Content focuses on cultural patterns in the German-speaking world. One class per week emphasizes oral communication skills. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: GERM-133 or equivalent.


GERM-233: German, Intermediate II (4)

Continuation of GERM-232. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: GERM-232 or equivalent. 

GERM-332: German Conversation and Composition I (3)

Promotes the advanced active use of German in culturally authentic contexts. Emphasis on the development of fluency and accuracy in oral and written communication. Written and oral exercises focus on a broad range of communicative genres. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: GERM-233 or equivalent.

GERM-333: German Conversation and Composition II (3)

Continuation of GERM-332. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: GERM-332 equivalent.

GERM-336: German Topics (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics taught in German include customs and manners, lands and regions, east and west, survey of arts, etc. Prerequisite: GERM-333 or permission of instructor.

GERM-338: Introduction to German Translation (3)

An introduction to the methods, techniques, and problems involved in translating from German into English. Emphasis on translating general material, with some consideration of the translation of specialized material. Introduction to the field of translation as a profession. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: GERM-333 or permission of instructor.

GERM-339: Business German (3)

Advanced language course designed to provide an introduction to the language and concepts of business and economics in German-speaking countries. The course combines acquisition of language skills with study of the geographical and sociopolitical context of the German-speaking world. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: GERM-233 or equivalent.

GERM-432: Studies in German Film (3)

Introduction to the history, theory, and critical analysis of the German cinema arts. Weekly film screenings provide a framework for the study and criticism of German film, from its beginnings through the New German Cinema. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: GERM-333 or permission of instructor.

GERM-433: German Lyric Poetry (3)

Survey of German lyric poetry, as well as selected examples of longer poetic works, as expressions of the German cultural identity throughout history. The focus of the course is interdisciplinary, encompassing poetry's relationship to music, visual art, historiography, religion and politics. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: GERM-333 or permission of instructor.

GERM-438: German Civilization I (3)

A survey of the cultural development of German-speaking Europe from its beginnings to the end of the Middle Ages. Historical developments, literature, art, and music are studied as the basis for discussion of German cultural history. Taught in German. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: GERM-333 or permission of instructor.

GERM-439: German Civilization II (3)

Continuation of GERM-438, covering German history from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century. Taught in German. Usually offered alternate springs. Prerequisite: GERM-333 or permission of instructor.

GERM-480: Senior Capstone: Concept of the City (3)

This senior capstone course celebrates students' functional German language abilities and cultural competence through the comparison and contrast of the historical, political, literary, and cultural trends of four major urban epicenters (Berlin, Buenos Aires, Paris, and St. Peters burg) from a variety of perspectives and genres. Taught in English, students write their final research papers in German. Prerequisite: senior standing and German Studies major.

 

Hebrew Courses

HEBR-116: Hebrew, Elementary Modern I (3)

Focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Designed for students with no prior experience with Hebrew. Usually offered every fall.

HEBR-117: Hebrew, Elementary Modern II (3)

Continuation of HEBR-116. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: HEBR-116 or equivalent.

HEBR-216: Hebrew, Intermediate Modern I (3)

Refinement of basic language skills in a cultural context. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures and development of communicative skills. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: HEBR-117 or equivalent.

HEBR-217: Hebrew, Intermediate Modern II (3)

Continuation of HEBR-216. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: HEBR-216 or equivalent.

HEBR-316: Advanced Hebrew Modern I (3)

This course promotes the advanced active use of Hebrew in culturally authentic contexts. Emphasis is on the development of fluency and accuracy in oral and written communication. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: HEBR-217 or equivalent.

HEBR-317: Advanced Hebrew Modern II (3)

Continuation of HEBR-316. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: HEBR-316 or equivalent.

HEBR-396: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

 

Italian Courses

ITAL-118: Italian, Elementary I (4)

Prepares students to function in everyday situations. Focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Designed for students with no prior experience with Italian. Usually offered every fall and summer.

ITAL-119: Italian, Elementary II (4)

Continuation of ITAL-118. Usually offered every spring and summer. Prerequisite: ITAL-118 or equivalent.

ITAL-196:ITAL-218: Italian, Intermediate I (4)

Refinement of basic language skills in a cultural context. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures and development of communicative skills. Content focuses on cultural patterns in the Italian-speaking world. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ITAL-119 or equivalent.

ITAL-219: Italian, Intermediate II (4)

Continuation of ITAL-218. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ITAL-218 or equivalent.

ITAL-318: Italian Conversation and Composition I (3)

Promotes the advanced active use of Italian in culturally authentic contexts. Emphasis on the development of fluency and accuracy in oral and written communication. Designed for students who have completed the intermediate level. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: ITAL-219 or equivalent.

ITAL-319: Italian Conversation and Composition II (3)

Continuation of ITAL-318. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: ITAL-318 or equivalent.

 

Japanese Courses

JAPN-114: Japanese, Elementary I (5)

Prepares students to function in everyday situations in the Japanese-speaking world. Focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Usually offered every fall.

JAPN-115: Japanese, Elementary II (5)

Continuation of JAPN-114. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: JAPN-114 or equivalent.

JAPN-214: Japanese, Intermediate I (5)

Refinement of basic language skills in a cultural context. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures and further development of communicative skills. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: JAPN-115 or equivalent.

JAPN-215: Japanese, Intermediate II (5)

A continuation of JAPN-214. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: JAPN-214 or equivalent.

JAPN-314: Advanced Japanese I (3)

Promotes the advanced active use of Japanese in culturally authentic contexts. Emphasis on the development of fluency and accuracy in oral and written communication. Includes social, economic, and political aspects of Japanese culture. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: JAPN-215 or equivalent.

JAPN-315: Advanced Japanese II (3)

Continuation of JAPN-314. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: JAPN-314 or equivalent.

 

Korean Courses

KOR-102: Korean Elementary I (5)

Designed for students with no prior experience with Korean, this course focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension.

KOR-103: Korean Elementary II (5)

Continuation of KOR-102. Prerequisite: KOR-102 or equivalent.

 

Portuguese Courses

PORT-102: Portuguese Elementary I (4)

This course, designed for students with no prior experience with Portuguese, focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Usually offered every fall.

 

Russian Courses

RUSS-144: Russian, Elementary I (5)

Prepares students to function in everyday situations in the Russian-speaking world. Focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Designed for students with no prior experience with Russian. Usually offered every fall.

RUSS-145: Russian, Elementary II (5)

Continuation of RUSS-144. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: RUSS-144 or equivalent.

RUSS-244: Russian, Intermediate I (5)

Refinement of basic language skills in a cultural context. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures and development of communicative skills. Content focuses on cultural patterns in the Russian-speaking world. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: RUSS-145 or equivalent.

RUSS-245: Russian, Intermediate II (5)

Continuation of RUSS-244. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: RUSS-244 or equivalent. Note: students may not receive credit for both RUSS-245 and RUSS-247.

RUSS-342: Russian Conversation and Composition I (3)

Promotes the advanced active use of Russian in culturally authentic contexts. Emphasis on the development of fluency and accuracy in oral and written communication. Review of grammatical structures and vocabulary expansion through extensive reading. Problems of style and creative use of language. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: RUSS-245 or equivalent. Note: students may not receive credit for both RUSS-342 and RUSS-344.

RUSS-343:Russian Conversation and Composition II (3)

Continuation of RUSS-342. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: RUSS-342 or equivalent. Note: students may not receive credit for both RUSS-343 and RUSS-345.

RUSS-441: Russian Media and Political Translation (3)

May be repeated for credit but not in the same term. Reading and translating selected sociopolitical texts and current periodical publications. Vocabulary expansion through study of word formation. Study of idioms, terms, and syntactic patterns. Meets with RUSS-641. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: three years of college Russian or equivalent or permission of instructor.

RUSS-443: Russian Business Translation (3)

May be repeated for credit but not in the same term. Development of business translation skills and an understanding of the socio-economic and political aspects of the business world. Study of language, terminology, stylistic constructions and related cross-cultural issues. Translation from Russian to English. Emphasis on translation methods, techniques and problems. Course covers areas such as finance, marketing, banking, taxation, trade and economics. Meets with RUSS-643. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: three years college Russian or permission of instructor.

RUSS-480: Senior Capstone: Concept of the City (3)

This senior capstone course celebrates students' functional Russian language abilities and cultural competence through the comparison and contrast of the historical, political, literary, and cultural trends of four major urban epicenters (Berlin, Buenos Aires, Paris, and St. Peters burg) from a variety of perspectives and genres. Taught in English, students write their final research papers in Russian. Prerequisite: senior standing and Russian Studies major.

RUSS-543: Russian Classics (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit in the same term with different topic. Emphasis on life and works of major writers. Usually offered every term.

RUSS-546: Russian Advanced Grammar and Composition I (3)

A systematic grammar review course for those who have had at least three years of Russian. There is a written assignment for every class, either a translation or an essay. Weekly quizzes test knowledge of grammatical constructions, vocabulary, and idioms. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: three years of college Russian.

RUSS-547: Russian Advanced Grammar and Composition II (3)

A continuation of RUSS-546. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: RUSS-546 or permission of instructor.

RUSS-548: Russian Topics (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Courses taught in Russian on such topics as: contemporary Russian society, Russia through film, the politics of culture in Russia, and others. Usually offered every spring.

RUSS-596: Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

RUSS-641: Advanced Russian Media and Political Translation (3)

May be repeated for credit but not in the same term. Development and perfection of translation skills. Emphasis on contemporary political culture. Translation of materials from current Russian press; vocabulary building; review of grammar and stylistics; demonstrations; classroom exercises; weekly home assignments; and weekly quiz. Individual translation project. Meets with RUSS-441. Usually offered every fall.

RUSS-643: Russian Business Translation (3)

May be repeated for credit but not in the same term. Development of business translation skills and an understanding of the socio-economic and political aspects of the business world. Study of language, terminology, stylistic constructions and related cross-cultural issues. Translation from Russian to English. Emphasis on translation methods, techniques and problems. Course covers areas such as finance, marketing, banking, taxation, trade and economics. Meets with RUSS-443. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: three years college Russian or permission of instructor.

RUSS-704: Seminar in Russian Studies (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Reports and critical discussion of research papers on Russian studies. Usually offered alternate falls.

 

Spanish Courses

SPAN-136: Intensive Spanish I (4)

Offered as part of the Madrid to the Mediterranean AU Abroad program. The elements of Spanish grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Usually offered every fall.

SPAN-152: Spanish, Elementary I (4)

Prepares students to function in everyday situations in the Hispanic world. Focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Designed for students with no prior experience with Spanish. Usually offered every fall and summer.

SPAN-153: Spanish, Elementary II (4)

Continuation of SPAN-152. Usually offered every spring and summer. Prerequisite: SPAN-152 or equivalent.

SPAN-236: Intensive Spanish II (4)

Prepares students to function in everyday situations in the Hispanic world. Focuses on the acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammatical structures in culturally authentic contexts through speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension. Designed for students with no prior experience with Spanish. Usually offered every fall and summer.

SPAN-252: Spanish, Intermediate I (4)

Refinement of basic language skills in a cultural context. Expansion of vocabulary and grammatical structures and further development of communicative skills. Content focuses on cultural patterns in the Hispanic world. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: SPAN-153 or equivalent.

SPAN-253: Spanish, Intermediate II (4)

Continuation of SPAN-252. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: SPAN-252 or equivalent.

SPAN-323: Spanish III (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad programs in Chile, this course reviews the basics of Spanish grammar including present, past, future, and preterite and imperfect tenses to help students gain conversational skills. For students who have completed intermediate levels of Spanish but not recently.

SPAN-333: Advanced Spanish III (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad programs in Chile, this course starts with a review of the preterite, imperfect tenses, and continues with lessons on prepositions, pronouns, imperative tense, and present and past subjunctive tenses. For students who have completed intermediate levels of Spanish recently.

SPAN-336: Intensive Spanish III (4)

Offered as part of the Madrid and the Mediterranean AU Abroad program. Students acquire fluency in comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. The course focuses on expository writing through analysis of a variety of texts with emphasis on the study and practical application of written discourse. Grammar, vocabulary, and punctuation are also addressed. Usually offered every fall.

SPAN-352: Spanish Conversation and Composition I (3)

Promotes the advanced active use of Spanish in culturally authentic contexts. Emphasis on the development of fluency and accuracy in oral and written communication. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: SPAN-253 or equivalent.

SPAN-353: Spanish Conversation and Composition II (3)

Continuation of SPAN-352. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: SPAN-352 or equivalent.

SPAN-356: Spanish Topics (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Courses taught in Spanish on such topics as: the social scene in Latin America, regionalism in Latin America, survey of Latin American arts, Mexican culture, the River Plate and Chile, race in Spanish-American literature, Latin American film, religion and violence, Hispanics in the United States, and the Latin American short story. Usually offered every term. Meets with SPAN-656. Prerequisite: SPAN-353 or permission of instructor.

SPAN-357: Introduction to Latin American Literature (3)

A systematic survey of the historical development of Latin American literature. Reading of selected texts in the original, and their relationship to cultural, historical, political, and social developments. This course is a transition course between SPAN-353 and higher level courses. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: SPAN-353.

SPAN-358: Introduction to Spanish Translation (3)

An introduction to the methods, techniques, and problems involved in translating Spanish into English. Emphasis is on translating general material, with some consideration of the translation of specialized material. Meets with SPAN-658. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: SPAN-353 or permission of instructor.

SPAN-359: Advanced Spanish Translation (3)

Practice and critique of translations of a range of material (general, literary, business, diplomatic, social science, and technical). Primarily from Spanish to English, with some translation from English to Spanish. Review of translation theory, methods, techniques, and problems. Meets with SPAN-659. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: SPAN-358 or equivalent.

SPAN-361: Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3)

Introduction to basic concepts of linguistics and their application to the Spanish language: phonology, morphology, syntax, etymology. Brief survey of the historical development of the Spanish language. Dialects of Spanish and other languages spoken in the Hispanic world. Introduction to a contrastive analysis of English and Spanish. Meets with SPAN-661. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: SPAN-353.

SPAN-362: United States-Latin American Relations (3)

Students acquire conversational proficiency with international relations terminology in Spanish and more in-depth knowledge of the special relations between the United States and Latin America. Examines political, diplomatic, economic, military, and other forces that have shaped United States-Latin American relations. Meets with SPAN-662. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: SPAN-353 or permission of instructor.

SPAN-363: Latin American Popular Culture (3)

This course examines a range of expressions of Latin American popular culture, including cartoons, comic strips, postage stamps, telenovelas, and folk art (such as Peruvian retablos, Chilean arpilleras, Panamanian molas, etc.). Theoretical concepts derived from semiotics (the study of linguistics signs such as words and visuals, and their meanings) are employed to provide a structure for analysis. meanings) are employed to provide a structure for analysis. Taught in Spanish with readings in Spanish and English. Meets with SPAN-663. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: SPAN-353 or three years of college Spanish or the equivalent.

SPAN-388: Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition (3)

Offered as part of the AU Abroad programs in Chile, this course develops and improves students146 written language skills as well as examining advanced grammar rules used to attain linguistic fluency. The course emphasizes written abilities and analyzes the different elements of creative writing, personal and work letters, legal documents, books and movies reviews. For students who have completed Spanish Conversation and Composition II or have the equivalent of three years of college level Spanish.

SPAN-389: Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition (3)

Offered as part of the Madrid and the Mediterranean AU Abroad program. In this course students develop and improve written language skills as well as examine advanced grammar rules used to attain linguistic fluency. The course emphasizes written abilities and analyzes the different elements of creative writing, personal and work letters, legal documents, books, and movie reviews. Usually offered every fall.

SPAN-450: Spanish Civilization I: Spain (3)

A study of the geography, history, arts, and literature of Spain from the beginning to the present. Meets with SPAN-650. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: three years of college Spanish or equivalent.

SPAN-480: Senior Capstone: Concept of the City (3)

This senior capstone course celebrates students' functional Spanish language abilities and cultural competence through the comparison and contrast of the historical, political, literary, and cultural trends of four major urban epicenters (Berlin, Buenos Aires, Paris, and St. Peters burg) from a variety of perspectives and genres. Taught in English, students write their final research papers in Spanish. Prerequisite: senior standing and Spanish Studies major.

SPAN-491: Internship: Proyecto Amistad (1-6)

An internship program offering a wide variety of experiences in the Spanish-speaking community of Washington, D.C. Placements are available in bilingual schools, legal and consumer agencies, and national and international organizations. Prerequisite: two years of college Spanish and permission of instructor or department.

SPAN-554: Classics of Latin American Literature (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Topics on a period of Spanish-American literature and culture from the colonial era to the present. Usually offered every term.

SPAN-559: Colloquium on Latin America (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Lectures, reports, and critical discussions on peoples and governments of Latin America. Cultural trends, political and economic problems, and international relations. Taught in Spanish. Usually offered every term.

SPAN-650: Spanish Civilization I: Spain (3)

A study of the geography, history, arts, and literature of Spain from the beginning to the present. Meets with SPAN-450. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: three years of college Spanish or equivalent.

SPAN-656: Spanish Topics (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Courses taught in Spanish on such topics as the social scene in Latin America, regionalism in Latin America, survey of Latin American arts, Mexican culture, the River Plate and Chile, race in Spanish-American literature, Latin American film, religion and violence, Hispanics in the United States, and the Latin American short story. Meets with SPAN-356. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: two years of college Spanish or equivalent.

SPAN-658: Introduction to Spanish Translation (3)

An introduction to the methods, techniques, and problems involved in translating from Spanish to English. Emphasis is on translating general material, with some consideration of the translation of specialized material. Meets with SPAN-358. Usually offered every fall.

SPAN-659: Advanced Spanish Translation (3)

Practice and critique of translations of a range of material (general, literary, business, diplomatic, social science, and technical). Primarily from Spanish to English, with some translation from English to Spanish. Review of translation theory, methods, techniques, and problems. Meets with SPAN-359. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: SPAN-658 or equivalent.

SPAN-661: Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3)

Introduction to basic concepts of linguistics and their application to the Spanish language: phonology, morphology, syntax, etymology. Brief survey of the historical development of the Spanish language. Dialects of Spanish and other languages spoken in the Hispanic world. Introduction to a contrastive analysis of English and Spanish. Meets with SPAN-361. Usually offered every fall.

SPAN 662: United States-Latin American Relations (3)

Students acquire conversational proficiency with international relations terminology in Spanish and more in-depth knowledge of the special relations between the United States and Latin America. Examines political, diplomatic, economic, military, and other forces that have shaped United States-Latin American relations. Meets with SPAN-362. Usually offered every term.

SPAN-663: Latin American Popular Culture (3)

This course examines a range of expressions of Latin American popular culture, including cartoons, comic strips, postage stamps, telenovelas, and folk art (such as Peruvian retablos, Chilean arpilleras, Panamanian molas, etc.). Theoretical concepts derived from semiotics (the study of linguistics signs such as words and visuals, and their meanings) are employed to provide a structure for analysis. Taught in Spanish with readings in Spanish and English. Meets with SPAN-363. Usually offered every term.

SPAN-691: Internship: Proyecto Amistad (1-3)

An internship program offering a wide variety of experiences in the Spanish-speaking community of Washington, D.C. Placements are available in bilingual schools, legal and consumer agencies, and national and international organizations. Prerequisite: two years of college Spanish and permission of instructor or department.

SPAN-705: Seminar in Spanish and Latin American Studies (3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Reports and critical discussion of Latin American studies research papers. Usually offered every term.

SPAN-706: Cultural Movements in Latin America Seminar (3)

This course examines a series of cultural movements in Latin America as seen through their literature and art, and analyzes how they have influenced (and have been influenced by) the historical and political setting of their times. The cultural movements include the pre-Colombian currents, Renaissance, baroque, neoclassicism, costumbrismo, realism, naturalism, modernism, and early twentieth century currents. Prerequisite: four years of college Spanish or the equivalent.

 

TESOL Courses

TESL-500: Principles of Linguistics (3)

Introduction to scientific study of language with emphasis on current linguistic trends. Foundations for further study in linguistics and methodology of language teaching. Usually offered every term.

TESL-501: English Language Teaching I (3)

Introduction to theories and principles of English language teaching, language acquisition, and a review of various methods and approaches used in language teaching, leading to an understanding of the development of the communicative approach. Provides opportunities for peer teaching and requires observation of English language classes, along with tutoring or teaching of English to non-native speakers. Usually offered every term.

TESL-502: English Language Teaching II (3)

Focuses on evaluation and development of lesson plans and teaching materials designed to teach grammar, language functions, speaking, reading, listening, and writing skills within a communicative approach. Also addresses various aspects of classroom management. Provides opportunities for peer teaching and requires observation of English language classes, along with tutoring or teaching of English to non-native speakers. Usually offered every spring and summer. Prerequisite: TESL-501 or permission of instructor.

TESL-503: Structure of English (3)

Explores the complexities of spelling and word formation, grammatical structure, and semantic relations in English. Various approaches to grammatical analysis are covered, but the emphasis is on developing the practical foundations necessary for effective teaching, rather than on theoretical models. Prerequisite: TESL-500. Usually offered every spring and summer.

TESL-504: Language Analysis (3)

An introduction to the formal analysis of languages, focusing on phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, with particular emphasis on topics not covered in TESL-503. Emphasis on problem-solving strategies with respect to language data. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: TESL-500.

TESL-522: Language Acquisition (3)

How and why do children learn language? Investigates language acquisition during the first five years (both speech and the rudiments of literacy). Major themes include the dynamics of the "language duet" between children and adults, variation across children, bilingualism, and the emergence of language awareness. Usually offered alternate falls.

TESL-523: Second Language Acquisition (3)

Theories of second language acquisition and how they relate to trends in society and in education and related disciplines. Current theory in cognitive and affective domains as it relates to second-language learning. Usually offered every spring and summer.

TESL-524: Reading and Writing in the ESL/EFL Classroom (3)

Introduction to theories of how we read and write as well as the instruction of these skills. The major focus is on practical approaches to teaching reading and writing skills to varied student populations, including children in public schools, young adults in pre-academic learning environments, and literacy-challenged adults in adult education programs. Usually offered every summer.

TESL-527: Cultural Issues in the ESL/EFL Classroom (3)

The traditional principles of intercultural communication theory and the latest discourse-oriented models for analyzing cross-cultural interactions. Within this framework, the course considers approaches to enhancing the cultural dimension of ESL/EFL instruction with an emphasis on using and developing various types of cultural training techniques. Usually offered every spring.

TESL-528: Bilingual Education (3)

Language acquisition, use, and competency in a bilingual setting, and the general goal of bilingual education. Usually offered every third semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

TESL-531: Language Assessment (3)

This course focuses on the process of testing/assessing students' language proficiency with respect to different language skills in the language classroom and the steps involved in this process. A practical approach provides opportunities for evaluating existing tests and assessment procedures, designing test/assessment instruments, and scoring/evaluating language tests. Usually offered every fall.

TESL-541: Teaching Grammar (3)

The functions that grammar fulfills in oral and written communication. Teaching the structures of grammar within a communicative framework in meaningful, authentic lessons, and the design of effective teaching materials. Usually offered every fall. Prerequisite: TESL-503 or permission of instructor.

TESL-542: Teaching Pronunciation: Theory and Practice (3)

An introduction to the formal analysis of phonetics and phonology with techniques for incorporating these into practical classroom instruction. An emphasis on problem-solving strategies with respect to data, and on effective low-cost techniques for instruction. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: TESL-500

TESL-545: Curriculum and Materials Design (3)

A needs-based, learning-centered approach to designing courses, from creating and structuring curriculum to materials design, with the emphasis on planning blocks of instruction larger than lesson plans. Students develop a curriculum designed for an actual learner audience on their own. Through needs assessment, they identify curricular goals and course objectives, and from these they determine an appropriate syllabus structure, develop a course unit outline, and create materials for one complete lesson. Curricula in both EFL and ESL are addressed. Usually offered alternate falls. Prerequisite: TESL-501.

TESL-554: Technology for Language Learning and Teaching (3)

An introduction to the use of technology for foreign/second language learning, teaching, and professional development. Includes the use of e-mail, listservs, the Internet, software evolution, authoring, applications, and other hands-on experiences utilizing technology in the classroom. Prerequisite: basic computer skills and TESL-501 or TESL-502 or permission of instructor.

TESL-560: TESOL Topics (1-3)

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Topics include teaching pronunciation, the lexical approach to language teaching, learning disabilities in the ELT classroom, EFL methodology, and multilevel/multicultural classrooms. Usually offered every term.

TESL-620: TESL-620 English Language Teaching III (3)

Focuses on teaching as communication, in particular, issues of classroom management, effective structuring of classroom discourse, and diagnosing and responding to learner needs. Students engage in field experience (observation and tutoring or teaching), peer teaching, and reflection on previous teaching and learning experiences with the goal of developing effective teaching practices. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: TESL-501 and TESL-502.

TESL-690: Independent Study Project (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

TESL-691: Internship (1-6)

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

TESL-693: AU/Peace Corps Internship (6)

For students in the M.A. in TESOL AU/Peace Corps program. Prerequisite: permission of program director.

 
Back to top