AU in the Neighborhood Newsletter

AU in the Neighborhood Community Relations Newsletter September 2013

July 2013

Washington College of Law Breaks Ground for New Home on Historic Tenley Campus

American University’s Washington College of Law broke ground this month at what will be its new home at the historic Tenley Campus. The ceremony, held on June 12, was hosted by American University President Cornelius Kerwin and Washington College of Law Dean Claudio Grossman. Students, alumni, faculty, staff, neighbors, and friends of the law school attended.

The eight-acre Tenley Campus site will provide a permanent home for the Washington College of Law (WCL) and enhance its rich tradition of innovation, excellence, and passion for the rule of law in the U.S. and beyond.

“We are extremely proud to share this day with the law school community, and are excited about the opportunities the new Tenley Campus will create,” said Grossman. “This is an important milestone in the life of the law school that will allow us to better carry out our mission. The Tenley location will improve our access to the branches of government, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and international organizations located in the nation’s capital that help facilitate unique opportunities for our community, faculty, students, and alumni. With the new campus, we will develop even further one of the most creative institutions in the nation.”

The Tenley Campus will be a vibrant legal center where WCL's world-class faculty, inspired students, dedicated alumni, and others come together to champion what matters. When construction is complete in fall 2015, WCL will be among the most technically advanced law schools in the country and the only one with a courthouse. The light-filled and LEED-certified facility, measuring approximately 312,000 square feet, will include flexible teaching spaces, expanded clinic space, teaching courtrooms, and multiple indoor and outdoor student study and meeting spaces throughout the campus. The enhanced Pence Law Library also will feature an Alumni Center that will provide the more than 18,000 alumni with research and business resources when they visit. The Tenley Campus also is located one block from the Metro, giving the legal community, business leaders, government officials, and alumni better access to the law school while providing students with a direct line to the heart of Washington, D.C.

Read more about the Tenley Campus here.

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Neighborhood Movie Night Slated for August 16

Mark your calendars now for August 16 and plan on bringing the whole family to campus for an outdoor screening of the 1979 classic, The Muppet Movie. The movie will be screened at the Woods-Brown Amphitheatre at 7:30 p.m. Free popcorn will be provided and all are welcome to attend.

For additional information, contact Andrew Huff, Director of Community Relations at 885-2167 or ahuff@american.edu.

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AU Hosts Middle School Students as Part of “College in Six” Program

In May, AU played host to 400 sixth grade students from Loudon County’s Harper Park Middle school as part of the county’s College in Six program. College in Six emphasizes the importance of preparing students for postsecondary education, careers, and long-term success beginning as early as sixth grade.

While on campus, students toured classrooms, residence halls, Bender Arena, and the university’s community garden and arboretum. They ate lunch on the quadrangle and interacted with officers from AU’s public safety team.

“This was by far the largest school group that the university has hosted,” said Community Relations Director Andrew Huff. “It was a great experience for all involved and exposing these students to a university campus this early in their education will surely pay off in the future.”

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Tenley Neighbors Join University Staff for Tour of Historic Capital Hall

Tenley neighbors and representatives of the Tenleytown Historical Society recently joined University Architect Jerry Gager and Director of Community Relations Andrew Huff for a tour of Capital Hall. Capital Hall is located on the university’s Tenley campus, the site of the new Washington College of Law (WCL).

Before American University acquired what became the Tenley campus in 1986, Capital Hall was part of the Immaculata campus, home to the Sisters of Providence of St. Mary of the Woods. In 1904, the Sisters, with the support of Cardinal Gibbons and St. Ann’s pastor, Father Mallon, purchased the property on which they built Immaculata Seminary. Immaculata was to be a select school for both boarders and day students. In addition to the wide range of academic subjects, students benefited from the cultural opportunities in the nation’s capital, as well as from the extensive grounds available for games.

By the mid-1980s, the members of the Sisters of Providence declined in number, and those who remained were advanced in years, one of the reasons that led the Sisters to close the school. [Information courtesy of Tenleytown Historical Society.]

As part of the upcoming Capital Hall renovation:

• Most of the existing structure will be adapted for office and small meeting use.

• The lower level will be converted to student offices for legal briefs and journals.

• The first level will accommodate administrative support offices such as Student Affairs, Financial Aid, and the Registrar.

• Administrative offices also will occupy a majority of the second and third floors.

• The chapel will be renovated to accommodate the WCL Trial Advocacy program; the main sanctuary will house a ceremonial moot courtroom; and the lower level will serve as multiple, flexible teaching courtrooms.

• Capital Hall’s existing exterior service court will be converted into an enclosed atrium that will connect to a new law school building on Yuma Street. The atrium will serve as a common area for the east end of the WCL campus.

Additional information on the new Washington College of Law can be found here.

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AU Buses Sport New Look

Three new biodiesel shuttle buses recently have hit the road and are touting AU’s stance on sustainability and clean energy through bold and bright designs.

The three “WONK”-ified vehicles are the three latest clean-energy buses to be added to the university’s fleet. The buses also feature a new look and design for the first time since the 1990s. The buses, which arrived on campus unmarked, were given the WONK treatment through custom-designed graphics.

Serving the dual purpose of communicating AU’s zero waste efforts to the community and being easily identifiable to riders as university vehicles, the buses introduce the forthcoming, fresh look that will further integrate university-wide branding and sustainability initiatives through cohesive visuals.

While all vehicles in the nine-bus fleet are fueled by 20-percent biodiesel, B20, new buses offer added emissions reductions due to engines’ enhanced clean-burning capabilities. These three buses, in addition to two others acquired after 2010, feature mechanical improvements that contribute to further energy savings. In essence, the newer engine itself generates savings in addition to overall usage of clean fuel.

AU adopted biodiesel-fueling methods for its entire fleet in December 2012, when the university transitioned to the alternative fuel (made from renewable resources) after installing an on-campus 1,000-gallon storage tank.

The addition of the new buses will help achieve AU’s goal of zero greenhouse gas emissions by the turn of the next decade. The Carbon Neutral 2020 initiative also includes campus-wide plans for composting, sourcing electricity from renewable resources, and a green building policy, among other proposals.

Plans to continue to replace older buses with these new, uber-efficient models are in the works, and branding and identification efforts will follow suit.

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AU Beekeeping Society Invites Community Volunteers

The American University Beekeeping Society (AUBS), a student-run club advised by School for International Service Assistant Professor Eve Bratman, maintains an on-campus apiary (beehives) and invites residents and community members to learn first-hand about urban beekeeping. Nearly 35 pounds of honey was harvested recently from the three hives located in the enclosed courtyards on the second floor of Mary Graydon Center. At this time, this honey is not for sale.

Visitors to the apiary have the opportunity to see the honey harvesting process, from the honeycomb's removal from the beehive to the lid being screwed onto a jar of official AU “Wonk” Honey.

Want to learn what all the "buzz" is about this summer by helping out at the hives? Contact Eve Bratman to get involved and learn why urban beekeeping is one of the hottest sustainable hobbies.

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DC Council Passes Ceremonial Resolution to Honor Deon Jones

Deon Jones, a junior in AU’s School of Public Affairs and former Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner in ANC 3D, was honored recently by the Council of the District of Columbia when they passed the "Deon T. Jones Recognition Resolution of 2013.” The resolution was sponsored by Ward 3 Councilmember Mary Cheh.

As the youngest elected official in the history of the District of Columbia, Jones represented Single Member District 3D 07 which included the South side of the AU campus. He recently was selected as a 2013 Harry S. Truman Scholarship recipient.

Currently, two American University students serve on Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3D: Rory Slatko, a rising junior in the School of International Service, represents ANC 3D07, which includes students living in Anderson, Centennial, Letts, Leonard, Hughes and McDowell Halls; and Joe Wisniewski, a rising senior in the School of Public Affairs, represents ANC 3D10, which includes the Avalon, Berkshire and Greenbriar apartment buildings, as well as Nebraska Hall and the Ward Circle condominiums.

Here’s the full text of the resolution:

A Ceremonial Resolution in the Council of the District of Columbia

Recognizing the outstanding academic achievements and community leadership of Deon Tramaine Jones in being named a 2013 Harry S. Truman Scholarship recipient, awarded to a select group of exemplary scholars from across the country.

WHEREAS, Mr. Jones is a junior majoring in Political Science at American University in Washington, D.C.;

WHEREAS, Mr. Jones is a National Spokesperson for the Campaign for Youth Justice, a non-governmental organization committed to ending youth involvement in the adult criminal justice system;

WHEREAS, Mr. Jones is the founder of the MANifest Leadership Institute, a leadership program that caters to incarcerated youth;

WHEREAS, as a first-generation college student, Mr. Jones was a White House intern in Vice President Joe Biden’s Correspondence Office and a Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Emerging Leader;

WHEREAS, after being elected as an Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner in Ward 3, Mr. Jones became the youngest elected official in the history of the District of Columbia;

WHEREAS, this year, American University nominated five students for the Truman Scholarship. American is one of 17 universities in the country to have three or more finalists in 2013. Since 2000, 11 Truman Scholars and 22 national finalists have hailed from American; and

WHEREAS, Mr. Jones is the first African-American recipient of the Truman Scholarship at American University.

RESOLVED, BY THE COUNCIL OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, That this resolution may be cited as the “Deon T. Jones Recognition Resolution of 2013.”

Sec. 2. The District of Columbia is grateful for Mr. Jones’ commitment to excellence and service to this city.

Sec. 3. This resolution shall take effect immediately upon the first date of publication in the District of Columbia Register.

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How to Contact Us

Office of Community Relations
(202) 885-2167
communityrelations@american.edu

Public Safety
non-emergency: (202) 885-2527
emergency: (202) 885-3636
Community Incident Reporting Form

Dean of Students
(202) 885-3300
www.american.edu/ocl/dos

Parking & Traffic Office
(202) 885-3111

 

 

Calendar of Events

Szalonna and his Band featuring Bob Cohen

Monday, July 1, 7 – 9 p.m.

Abramson Family Recital Hall

Szalonna and his Band are musicians of the Hungarian National Folk Ensemble. Their concerts feature the beautiful tunes of the Danubian Basin. They are regular participants of the most popular festivals in Hungary and have toured extensively worldwide. Bob Cohen is a musician who approaches klezmer music as a living folk art, and presents it in the style it would have been performed in its heyday. In addition to Hungarian, Romanian, Moldavian, and Yiddish music, his repertoire also includes traditional Hasidic tunes. The joint performance of Szalonna and his Band and Bob Cohen is a unique and exclusive opportunity to experience the multicultural heritage of Hungary and Eastern Europe. Tickets: $15. To purchase, visit: http://american.tix.com

How I Became a Bennington Girl

Saturday, July 6, 4 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Sunday, July 7 4 p.m.

Katzen Studio Theatre

Written by Sidra Rausch and directed by Susan Lynskey and Karen Berman, the play follows a young woman who arrives at Bennington College and embarks on a journey to find her unique inner voice, only to be confronted by the anti-Semitism of her faculty advisor in this semi-autobiographical account. The play is part of Washington Women in Theatre Presents 10th Anniversary Celebration With New Plays and Music by Women. Tickets ($12 general admission; $10 for students and seniors) may be purchased online: american.tix.com

Double-Header: Frances Perkins and Some Like It Hot

Sunday, July 7 8 – 10 p.m.

Katzen Studio Theatre

Frances Perkins, written and performed solo by Mary Suib, follows the life of author, labor movement champion, and politico, Frances Perkins. Perkins was the first woman to hold a cabinet position in the U.S. and thus the first woman to enter the presidential line of succession. This show is a funny and poignant look at her life in the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration and her family plagued by manic-depression.

Some Like it Hot is performed by Barbara Papendorp and Amy Conley. Songs of love and hope and women by the great composers of jazz and cabaret standards are sung by the D.C. chanteuse and her piano accompanist. The performances are part of Washington Women in Theatre Presents 10th Anniversary Celebration With New Plays and Music by Women. Tickets ($12 general admission; $10 for students and seniors) may be purchased online: american.tix.com.

Washington Art Matters: The 1970s

Saturday, July 13, 4 – 5:30 p.m.

American University Museum

In support of the exhibition Washington Art Matters 1940s–1980s, the American University Museum presents a series of panels that provide first-hand accounts of those five creative decades. Each panel will cover art trends, historical events and anecdotes of the times. Artist guests and others in the audience will be encouraged to offer memories. The panel moderators are co-authors of the newly-released Washington Art Matters, Art Life in the Capital, 1940–1990, a book produced by the Washington Arts Museum and celebrated by this exhibition. For more information, visit http://www.american.edu/cas/museum/index.cfm

On Collecting Fine Art: Collecting Photographs: Vintage and Contemporary Photographs

Thursday, July 18, 7 – 8:30 p.m.

Abramson Family Recital Hall

On Collecting Fine Art is a series of panel discussions designed to encourage collecting fine art with advice from established Washington area gallery owners who will share their knowledge and expertise. Topics covered in the various panels will include how to get started, how to educate your eye, how to develop a collection, how to understand descriptions of various processes and techniques, and how to maintain best practices for archival preservation of an art collection. This is the second of four sessions. Admission is free.

Washington Art Matters: The 1980s

Saturday, July 20, 3 – 4:30 p.m.

American University Museum

In support of the exhibition Washington Art Matters 1940s–1980s, the American University Museum presents a series of panels that provide first-hand accounts of those five creative decades. Each panel will cover art trends, historical events and anecdotes of the times. Artist guests and others in the audience will be encouraged to offer memories. The panel moderators are co-authors of the newly-released Washington Art Matters, Art Life in the Capital, 1940–1990, a book produced by the Washington Arts Museum and celebrated by this exhibition. For more information, visit http://www.american.edu/cas/museum/index.cfm

On Collecting Fine Art: Collecting Sculpture, Glass and Three-Dimensional Art

Thursday, July 25, 7 – 8:30 p.m.

Abramson Family Recital Hall

On Collecting Fine Art is a series of panel discussions designed to encourage collecting fine art with advice from established Washington area gallery owners who will share their knowledge and expertise. Topics covered in the various panels will include how to get started, how to educate your eye, how to develop a collection, how to understand descriptions of various processes and techniques, and how to maintain best practices for archival preservation of an art collection. This is the third of four sessions. Admission is free.

Gallery Talk: Raya Bodnarchuk

Saturday, July 27, 4 – 5 p.m.

American University Museum

Join Raya Bodnarchuk in a gallery talk about her exhibition Raya Bodnarchuk: Form, on display through August 11. For more information, visit http://www.american.edu/cas/museum/

For event details and a full list of all upcoming events, see the University Events Calendar.

For a listing of upcoming events for AU alumni, please visit the Alumni Events Calendar.

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