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AU in the Neighborhood Newsletter

July 2015

July 2015

AU Music Ensembles Welcome Community Participants

Music at Katzen

The American University music program is pleased to invite community members to audition for the university’s orchestra, bands, and choirs. Each group meets weekly starting the first week in September and continues through the academic year.

For more information, please email the ensemble directors below. Auditions will be held the week of August 31.

AU Symphony Orchestra – Every Monday & Wednesday, 8:10 – 10:40 p.m.

Contact: Yaniv Dinur (Orchestra@american.edu)

AU Symphonic Band – Every Tuesday, 5:30 – 8 p.m.

Contact: NJ Snider, Director Music Program (nsnider@american.edu)

AU Chorus – Every Tuesday, 7:30 – 10 p.m. and select Mondays 8 - 10 p.m.

Contact: Casey Cook (chorus@american.edu)

AU Jazz Orchestra – Wednesday, 5:30 – 8 p.m.

Contact: Joshua Bayer (joshuabayerjazz@gmail.com)

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How to Contact Us

Office of Community Relations
(202) 885-2167
communityrelations@american.edu

Public Safety
non-emergency: (202) 885-2527
emergency: (202) 885-3636
Community Incident Reporting Form

Dean of Students
(202) 885-3300
www.american.edu/ocl/dos

Parking & Traffic Office
(202) 885-3111

See You at Neighborhood Movie Night, August 21

Monsters University

Mark your calendars now for August 21 and plan to bring the whole family to campus for a picnic and an outdoor screening of the animated classic, Monsters University.

The sequel to the popular Monsters, Inc., Monsters University unlocks the door to how Mike and Sulley overcame their differences and became the best of friends.

Co-hosted by our neighbors at the Metropolitan Memorial United Methodist Church, the movie will be screened at the Woods-Brown Amphitheatre at 8 p.m. Free popcorn will be provided and all are welcome to attend. Rain location is the Mary Graydon Center Tavern.

For additional information, contact Andrew Huff, Director of Community Relations at 885-2167 or ahuff@american.edu.

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Community Audit Program Gears Up for Fall

Audit Program

Although summer is just settling in around campus, it is not too early for our neighbors to start thinking about their options for enrolling in fall semester classes as part of AU’s Community Audit Program.

Modeled after the Alumni Audit Program, the Community Audit Program offers adults ages 60 and older, who live in the 20016 zip code, the opportunity to attend university courses on a noncredit basis for a modest charge. Auditors may listen to the same lectures and work from the same texts as enrolled students.

For just $100, $75 of which serves as a donation to the Alumni Association Scholarship Fund, neighbors have the opportunity to pursue a commitment to lifelong learning. The program is designed to be a rewarding way to enhance professional skills, take classes with popular professors, or simply an opportunity to delve into a new hobby.

“The Community Audit Program is another great benefit for those who live close to the university,” said Andrew Huff, AU’s Director of Community Relations. “Our neighbors have some very interesting experiences and life stories, so I believe that our students and professors will learn just as much from them as our neighbors will learn from the class.”

Registration for the fall semester opens on July 10. For additional information, please visit http://goo.gl/XEA13 or contact Kristena Wright at 202-885-5962.

The Community Audit Program is coordinated by the Office of Alumni Relations in conjunction with the Office of Community Relations.

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Police Academy Graduates Join AU Public Safety

Public Safety

American University now counts eleven recent graduates of the Campus Public Safety Institute (CPSI) Police Academy as members of its public safety officer force. This year’s diverse graduating class of new officers includes three AU alumnae, as well as four individuals who served in the military or National Guard.

To become AU public safety officers, the eleven individuals attended the CPSI Police Academy’s rigorous eight-week basic police training. Their comprehensive course of studies included law enforcement in an academic setting, DC police codes, Constitutional law, criminal procedure, crime scene procedures, evidence gathering, search and seizure laws, vehicle stops and traffic control, defensive tactics, as well as other policing-related topics.

Each of this year’s graduates met and often surpassed the requirements of the CPSI curriculum. Officer Amanda Kaja earns special praise as the recipient of the Top Academic Award for achieving perfect scores throughout the Academy’s program of studies, as well as for being the winner of the Top Physical Fitness Silver Medal. Officer Kevin Taub received an Academic Award for graduating with a 99.9 percent score. Officers Tanar Akilah Wright-Sackey, Cody Canard, and Lawanda Hermanstine also all received Academic Awards for graduating with 97 percent scores.

AU’s Executive Director, University Police & Emergency Management Phil Morse said, “It was an honor to participate in the graduation ceremony to recognize the new officers and their outstanding achievements. They are a welcome addition to a Public Safety team dedicated to providing the highest level of safety and security services to our university community.”

The eleven new public safety officers already are assigned to field training officers and have begun working on campus.

The Campus Public Safety Institute is a project of the District of Columbia Consortium of Universities and trains campus law enforcement personnel in up-to-date techniques, laws, and procedures for certification as a special police officer in DC. The Institute also draws on the resources of the Metropolitan Police Department.

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Katzen Arts Center Summer 2015 Exhibitions

Katzen Night

Michael Gross: Abstraction

Now through July 26

Painter and printmaker Michael Gross offers expressive and emotionally filled works using a kaleidoscope of color. Gross creates art as “a means of grappling with the impulses and struggles that make up the way I see my place in the world.” Through his visual lexicon, which is devoid of ideological reference, Gross seeks to create order from chaos. His lyrical compositions of concatenated lines, textured surfaces and rich hues, invoke Abstract Expressionism, and pay homage to artists who inspire his work, Willem de Kooning, Richard Diebenkorn, and Jackson Pollock. The exhibition is curated by Myrtis Bedolla.

Outliers: Kurt Godwin and Betsy Packard

Now through July 26

This exhibition is a dialogue between two Washington-area artists who have been working outside the boundaries of mainstream contemporary art for more than three decades. They have effectively transformed ordinary objects, found images, and simple matter into fundamentally new conditions of meaning. Such expansions of art's real possibilities are what “Outliers” do. The exhibition is curated by J.W. Mahoney.

Realism Transformed: John Winslow's Wild New World

Now through July 26

In the early to mid-1980s, masterful Washington realist John Winslow engineered a series of stunning changes in his work. Precisely defined spaces became ambiguous, right angles became swooping curves, and once-static figures left gravity behind to dance gracefully and crazily through the air. By radically recasting his art, Winslow set the stage for the surprising, vibrant, and equally stunning body of work.

Hiroshima-Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Exhibition

Now through August 16

In commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima-Nagasaki, this powerful show will include 20 artifacts collected from the debris of the 1945 atomic bombings, as well as six large folding screens that depict the horrors of the event. The 1995 Nobel Peace Prize nominees, Iri and Toshi Maruki, created a total of 15 screens over 32 years from 1950. This exhibition, made possible by the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum, is meant to deepen understanding of the damage wrought by nuclear weapons and inspire peace in the 21st century. The exhibition also will feature Hiroshima Children's Drawings from All Souls Unitarian Church. The drawings present a story of hope and reconciliation.

Visvaldis Ziediņš Travels in the Imagination

Now through July 26

Working quietly and in near obscurity during the dark days of the Latvian Soviet period, artist Visvaldis Ziediņš amassed a remarkable body of more than 3,000 works. This survey brings his witty assemblages, sculptures, collages, and paintings to American audiences for the first time. These works reveal a vivid imagination unfettered by material and political pressures and bear comparison to contemporaneous explorations by such better known avant gardists as Pablo Picasso, John Cage, Joseph Cornell, Robert Rauschenberg, Antoni Tapies, and Arman.

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Improve Your English Language Skills at AU

ELP

The English Language Program (ELP) at American University offers evening on-campus and online courses for intermediate- to advanced-level students who wish to improve their English language skills for academic, professional, or social settings. Students do not need to be enrolled at American University to register for an ELP course. Part-time and intensive full-time options are available.

Offering four CEUs (Continuing Education Units), the TOEFL Preparation and Business Communication courses are highly interactive with a student-centered approach that is customized to students' particular language needs. Experienced instructors with master's degrees or TESOL certifications lead all classes that meet on the AU campus.

The full-time Intensive ELP (IELP) program meets 20 hours per week, offering four levels of instruction from beginner to advanced. Visa support is provided for qualified international students in IELP. Guest lectures, site visits, and other experiential learning opportunities are built into IELP. Students also have access to all AU facilities including the library, athletic center, clubs and organizations, and Academic Support and Access Center.

For more information, visit http://www.american.edu/spexs/elta/, email elta@american.edu or call (202) 895-4970.

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Calendar of Events

Michael Gross: Abstraction

Through July 26, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Katzen Museum

Painter and printmaker Michael Gross offers expressive and emotionally filled works using a kaleidoscope of color. Gross creates art as “a means of grappling with the impulses and struggles that make up the way I see my place in the world.” Through his visual lexicon, which is devoid of ideological reference, Gross seeks to create order from chaos. His lyrical compositions of concatenated lines, textured surfaces and rich hues, invoke Abstract Expressionism, and pay homage to artists who inspire his work, Willem de Kooning, Richard Diebenkorn, and Jackson Pollock. Exhibit is curated by Myrtis Bedolla.

Outliers: Kurt Godwin and Betsy Packard

Through July 26, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Katzen Museum

Curated by J.W. Mahoney, Outliers is a dialogue between two Washington-area artists who have been working outside the boundaries of mainstream contemporary art for more than three decades. These artists have effectively transformed ordinary objects, found images, and simple matter into fundamentally new conditions of meaning. Such expansions of art's real possibilities are what “Outliers” do.

Realism Transformed: John Winslow's Wild New World

Through August 16, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Katzen Museum

In the early to mid-1980s, masterful Washington realist John Winslow engineered a series of stunning changes in his work. Precisely defined spaces became ambiguous, right angles became swooping curves, and once-static figures left gravity behind to dance gracefully and crazily through the air. By radically recasting his art, Winslow set the stage for the surprising, vibrant, and equally masterful body of work that is the focus of this exhibition.

Hiroshima-Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Exhibition

Through August 16, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Katzen Museum

In commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima-Nagasaki, this powerful show will include 20 artifacts collected from the debris of the 1945 atomic bombings, as well as six large folding screens that depict the horrors of the event. The 1995 Nobel Peace Prize nominees, Iri and Toshi Maruki, created a total of 15 screens over 32 years from 1950. This exhibition, made possible by the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum, is meant to deepen understanding of the damage wrought by nuclear weapons and inspire peace in the 21st century. The exhibition also will feature Hiroshima Children's Drawings from All Souls Unitarian Church. The drawings present a story of hope and reconciliation.

Visvaldis Ziediņš Travels in the Imagination

Through July 26, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Katzen Museum

Working quietly and in near obscurity during the dark days of the Latvian Soviet period, artist Visvaldis Ziediņš amassed a remarkable body of more than 3,000 works. This survey brings his witty assemblages, sculptures, collages, and paintings to American audiences for the first time. These works reveal a vivid imagination unfettered by material and political pressures and bear comparison to contemporaneous explorations by such better known avant gardists as Pablo Picasso, John Cage, Joseph Cornell, Robert Rauschenberg, Antoni Tapies, and Arman.


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