ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-060
Summer Field School: Archaeology (0)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Noncredit participation in the excavation of an archaeological site. Training varies depending on the site, but usually includes site surveying, archaeological engineering, techniques of excavation, flora, fauna, and soil analysis, field laboratory practice, and on-site computer data processing. Usually offered every summer.

ANTH-095

Course Level: Undergraduate

ANTH-096
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (0)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

ANTH-099

Course Level: Graduate

ANTH-110
Culture and the Human Experience FA3 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

People around the world create and use systems of symbols to express their identities as members of social groups. This course draws on diverse life-cycle experiences in tribal, state-level, and post-colonial societies to explore ways that both tradition and contact with other cultures contribute to the cultural pluralism of the contemporary world. Usually offered every term.

ANTH-150
Anthropology of Life in the United States FA4 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

How race, gender, class, ethnicity, age, and region affect Americans' experiences of interwoven historical, economic, political, scientific, religious, and cultural processes. Usually offered every fall.

ANTH-194
Community Service-Learning Project (1)

Course Level: Undergraduate

May be taken pass/fail only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and Center for Community Engagement & Service.

ANTH-196
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

ANTH-210
Roots of Racism and Interracial Harmony FA3 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Examines why racism has often characterized the relations between human groups, and compares these cases with other societies which have been nonracist. Social stratification, ideas about the nature and role of individuals, and economic factors are considered within and across cultures. The course links analysis of the past to possible social action. Usually offered every term.

ANTH-215
Sex, Gender, and Culture FA3 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

How economic systems, social structures, and values construct and redefine biological distinctions between women and men. Includes gender in egalitarian societies; origins and consequences of patriarchy; gay and lesbian cultures; gender, politics, and social change. Case studies from tribal, state-level, and post-colonial contexts. Usually offered every term.

ANTH-220
Living in Multicultural Societies FA3 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Foreign trade, foreign aid, tourism, and migration establish ties between peoples and cultures in spite of political and historical divisions. Examines the effect of international migration and the growing "one-world" economy on the daily lives of peoples around the world and in the emerging multicultural urban centers in the United States. Usually offered every spring.

ANTH-225
Language and Human Experience FA1 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Examines language and its contribution to creativity, and how knowledge of language enriches human experience. Includes imagery and metaphor building through language; the effects of topic, speaking situation, and gender on creativity in tribal, state-level, and post-colonial contexts; and ways written language recasts and redefines human imagination. Usually offered every fall.

ANTH-230
India: Its Living Traditions FA3 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The rich diversity among peoples and cultures of India through time and the significance of various traditions for contemporary life. Individual experiences of caste, class, gender, and sect are examined, as are outside influences on social patterns and modes of thought, revealing complex interplay between tradition and modernity, India and the West. Usually offered every spring.

ANTH-235
Early America: The Buried Past FA2 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

An introduction to how archaeology reconstructs this country's historic past. The course looks at the way archaeologists use both artifacts and written records to tell the story of life in the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries. Emphasis on artifact and document interpretation, architecture, consumerism, African diaspora, and early non-Anglo settlers. Usually offered every spring.

ANTH-250
Human Origins FA5 (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

The contributions that physical anthropology and archaeology can make toward an understanding of the origins and development of humankind. Includes genetics, the principles of evolution as applied to humans, the nonhuman primates and their behavior, human fossils, and the archaeology of the New and Old Worlds. Usually offered every fall.

ANTH-251
Anthropological Theory (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Exploration of a variety of current perspectives in cultural anthropology. The kinds of questions anthropologists ask in seeking to understand cultural variation and diverse human experience. The relevance of anthropology to life in a changing, multicultural world.

ANTH-253
Introduction to Archaeology (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Archaeology as a subfield of anthropology. Includes the history of archaeology, methods of archaeological excavation and analysis, the historical archaeology of seventeenth and eighteenth century America, paleolithic archaeology in the Old World, the prehistory of North and South America, and other current discoveries and issues within the field. Usually offered every spring.

ANTH-254
Language and Culture (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Examines connections between language, culture and society. Includes grammars as systems of knowledge; language and cognition; structure of everyday discourse; language diversity; speech communities; language change; literacy and language planning. Usually offered every spring.

ANTH-294
Community Service-Learning Project (1)

Course Level: Undergraduate

May be taken pass/fail only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and Center for Community Engagement & Service.

ANTH-296
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

ANTH-330
Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

A comparative study of magic, witchcraft, and religion in Western and non-Western societies. Includes an analysis of ritual behavior and the ritual process, mythology, sorcery, and revitalization movements. Prerequisite: ANTH-251 or permission of instructor.

ANTH-331
Taboos (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Exploration of those persons, items, experiences, and acts which so frighten and repel humans that they try to prohibit them. Includes discussion of subjects rich in taboo and sensitivity including sexuality, witchcraft, cannibalism, human-animal relations, madness, and death. Why taboos emerge, how they are enforced, and when they are violated. Prerequisite: ANTH-251 or permission of instructor.

ANTH-334
Environmental Justice (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Focuses on issues of inequalities attending the destruction of resources, the siting of dangerous facilities, dumping of toxic wastes, and the development of technologies that harm some people while benefiting others. Case studies from North America, Latin America, Africa, the Arctic, Pacific, and Caribbean examine questions about history, social relations, power, connections among the world's societies, and competing values.

ANTH-337
Anthropology of Genocide (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Examines questions concerning how individuals, groups, and social institutions legitimize the power to repress, coerce, and kill, how victims experience and interpret their suffering, how "ordinary people" come to accept and justify violent regimes, and the possibility of constructing an understanding of genocide that extends across cultures and from individual impulse to global conflict. Case studies include genocide in the Americas, the Nazi Holocaust, and ethnic cleansing in Central Africa and Eastern Europe.

ANTH-350
Special Topics (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Cross-cultural comparison and analysis within selected culture areas. Rotating topics include human osteology, language and sexuality, student activism and social justice, and archaeology of the Chesapeake Bay region.

ANTH-390
Independent Reading Course in Anthropology (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

ANTH-394
Community Service-Learning Project (1)

Course Level: Undergraduate

May be taken pass/fail only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and Center for Community Engagement & Service.

ANTH-396
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

ANTH-439
Culture, History, Power, Place (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Examination of a particular culture area to provide insight into the conditions that produced distinctive cultures in certain geographical regions. Rotating culture areas include North American Indians, Latin America, Mexico and Central America, African American women, India, Africa, China, and Japan. Meets with ANTH-639. Usually offered every term.

ANTH-440
Contemporary Ethnographies (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Surveys theory through the original writings of anthropologists. Contemporary perspectives and debates in anthropology examined through close, critical readings of cutting-edge studies. These readings reflect current approaches in the field such as culture and political economy, postmodern multi-vocal texts, feminist ethnographies, and post-colonial writing. How ethnographies are crafted, including how authors contexualize their subject and their own involvement, uses of evidence, and literary devices. Prerequisite: ANTH-251 or permission of instructor.

ANTH-450
Anthropology of Power (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Capstone seminar for anthropology majors which explores a central question for the discipline, the exploration of power. Examines the questions of how people experience and articulate power relations, how power is legitimized, where power comes from, how power relations shift over time and place, and how the study of power enriches and infuses anthropological studies. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: anthropology major with at least 36 credit hours of courses in the major.

ANTH-452
Anthropological Research Methods (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

An introduction to research methods used within the field of anthropology, including ethnography, the distinctive tool of the field. Includes research design, data collection, quantitative and qualitative analysis. Ethics and pragmatics of research are discussed, including research funding and proposal writing. Prerequisite: ANTH-251 and one other course in anthropology.

ANTH-490
Independent Study Project in Anthropology (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

ANTH-491
Internship in Anthropology (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

ANTH-494
Community Service-Learning Project (1)

Course Level: Undergraduate

May be taken pass/fail only. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and Center for Community Engagement & Service.

ANTH-496
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

ANTH-498
Senior Thesis in Anthropology (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

May be repeated for credit but not in the same term, for a maximum of 6 credit hours. Opportunity for qualified undergraduates to carry out anthropological research under supervision of members of the faculty. Development of a written paper and participation in senior thesis seminar are required. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: permission of department chair.

ANTH-531
Topics in Archaeology (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include historical archaeology, artifact analysis, archaeology of the Chesapeake, archaeology of the Potomac Valley, Aztec, Inca, and Maya, and archaeology and politics.

ANTH-533
Managing Cultural Resources (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Explores the field of cultural resources management and preservation. This course examines the range of resources - from archeological sites to historic structures to living communities - that are often given protected status and the reasons for such protection. Also considers the benefits to society of this protection, along with the available policies, processes, and laws that are utilized in the preservation effort.

ANTH-534
Class and Culture (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Discussion of the way that anthropologists have used and developed the concept of class as a way to understand patterns of social inequality. The variation in relationships of class to economic, social, and political structures in different societies and how class experiences and struggles influence and are influenced by the cultural norms and values in different social systems.

ANTH-535
Ethnicity and Nationalism (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Ethnicity has become a universal means for groups to defend their interests, avoid alienation, and create powerful rituals of self-preservation and defense. This course examines ways that groups in complex societies and new nations use ethnicity and nationalism to express and enact community and identity, similarity and difference, peaceful social relations, warfare, and genocide.

ANTH-537
Topics in Language and Culture (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Comparative perspectives on the interrelationships of cultural and linguistic patterns in different societies. Case studies focus on language variation and pluralism, social hierarchies, gender diversity, language history, colonialism, and nation building.

ANTH-541
Public Anthropology and State Policy (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

This course traces shifting relationships among governments, anthropologists, and ordinary people. Readings and class discussions explore the rise of applied anthropology as part of the processes of colonialism and capital accumulation. Also covered are colonial encounters, immigration and internment, neocolonialism, and structural adjustment. Prerequisite: two courses in anthropology or graduate standing.

ANTH-542
Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Explores efforts to build a public anthropology which advances popular struggles for economic freedom, human rights, and social justice while maintaining a critique of state power. The course also examines how such work engages conventional approaches to research, publication, and career advancement, and suggests pathways to alternative anthropological careers.

ANTH-543
Anthropology of Development (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Anthropological approaches to the analysis of economic development and change, with attention to both theory and practice. Development problems as perceived at the local level, contemporary development concerns, and the organization of development agencies and projects. Usually offered every fall.

ANTH-544
Topics in Public Anthropology (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. The application of anthropological method and theory to solving problems in contemporary society. Rotating topics include anthropology of education, health, culture and illness, public archaeology, media activisim, and anthropology of human rights.

ANTH-550
Ethnographic Field Methods (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Using a series of research exercises, students learn how to collect genealogies, gather censuses of research populations, conduct directed and nondirected interviews, map research areas, work with photographic data, collect life histories, observe as participants, write research proposals, and evaluate data. Ethical and methodological fieldwork problems are stressed throughout.

ANTH-560
Summer Field School: Archaeology (1-9)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with the same topic. Active participation in the excavation of an archaeological site. Training varies depending on the site, but usually includes site surveying, archaeological engineering, techniques of excavation, flora, fauna, and soil analysis, field laboratory practice, and on-site computer data processing. Usually offered every summer.

ANTH-590
Independent Reading Course in Anthropology (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

ANTH-596
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

ANTH-631
Foundations of Social and Cultural Anthropology (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This seminar reviews a selection of major works at the foundation of contemporary socio-cultural anthropology. The focus is on classic works that illustrate the theoretical perspectives, analyses, and trends in the field. The central concern is how anthropologists and other social scientists have defined the field, the kinds of questions they have asked, and the methods they have used, in the broadest sense, to answer those questions. Usually offered every fall.

ANTH-632
Contemporary Theory: Culture, Power, History (3)

Course Level: Graduate

This course addresses developments and debates in anthropology over the last three decades, looking at how central concerns in anthropology are recast over time, as well as how new concerns emerge with new theory. The course grounds the central concept of culture in analyses that emphasize its relationship to historical process as well as class, race, and gender, and the use and abuse of the culture concept in struggles for identity, dominance, and liberation. Usually offered every spring.

ANTH-634
Foundations of Archaeology (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. This course explores archaeological theories and frameworks that have emerged or seen strong developments since ca. 2000, such as labor, sexuality, queer, identity, pragmatist, and phenomenological theories. The centrality of theories in the broader practice of anthropological archaeology and how the broader political climate influences the emergence and decline of particular interests of archaeological theory is discussed. Usually offered every fall.

ANTH-635
Race, Gender and Social Justice (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. This seminar explores the disjunction between biological myths of race and gender and their social construction as credible institutions; the historical, economic, and political roots of inequalities; the institutions and ideologies that buttress and challenge power relations; and the implications of social science teaching and research for understanding social class, race, and gender discrimination. Issues of advocacy for social change are also explored. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

ANTH-637
Discourse, Text, and Voice (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. This seminar reviews current approaches to studies of narrative and conversation, and the insights into social location, ideology, and claims to power which such studies disclose. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: graduate standing in anthropology or permission of instructor.

ANTH-639
Culture, History, Power, Place (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Examination of a particular culture area to provide insight into the conditions that produced distinctive cultures in certain geographical regions. Rotating culture areas include North American Indians, Latin America, Mexico and Central America, African American women, India, Africa, China, and Japan. Meets with ANTH-439. Usually offered every term.

ANTH-640
Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include issues such as social inequality, urban nature, militarism and state violence, reading/resisting neoliberalism, and Southwest archaeology. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: graduate standing in anthropology or permission of instructor.

ANTH-652
Anthropological Research Design (3)

Course Level: Graduate

An introduction to research methods used within the field of anthropology, including ethnography, the distinctive tool of the field. Includes research design, data collection, quantitative and qualitative analysis. Ethics and pragmatics of research are discussed, including research funding and proposal writing. Usually offered every spring.

ANTH-690
Independent Study Project in Anthropology (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

ANTH-691
Internship in Anthropology (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.

ANTH-696
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

ANTH-796
Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

ANTH-797
Master's Thesis Seminar (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Usually offered every term. May be taken SP/UP only.

ANTH-897
Dissertation Preparation Workshop (1-9)

Course Level: Graduate

This course facilitates preparation of the doctoral dissertation proposal and achievement of candidacy and includes strategies for preparation for comprehensive examinations, getting external funding, practical preparation for fieldwork, meeting challenges to doing research, analyzing data, and completing the dissertation in a timely fashion. May be taken pass/fail only. Prerequisite: admission to PhD program.

ANTH-898
Doctoral Continuing Enrollment (1-9)

Course Level: Graduate

May be taken by doctoral students completing coursework, exams or proposals in preparation for advancement to candidacy. It is a 1-9 credit course that can be repeated once and may be taken with or without regular coursework. Tuition is assessed at the 1 credit rate. The course is graded SP/UP and students must have the approval of their Program Director. Academic load will be determined by total enrolled credits for the semester. This course may not be used to establish full-time status for merit aid except for students with a half-time appointment who have an approved plan to distribute a total of 18 credits over one calendar year (6 credits during Fall, Spring and Summer semesters). May be taken SP/UP only. Prerequisite: doctoral students with permission of program director.

ANTH-899
Doctoral Dissertation

Course Level: Graduate

May be taken by doctoral students who are advanced to candidacy with the approval of the faculty supervising the dissertation (or designee). It is a 9 credit course, but tuition is assessed at the 1 credit rate. The course is graded SP/UP and students will be deemed full-time. The Office of the Registrar must be notified when a student has advanced to candidacy. May be taken SP/UP only. Prerequisite: doctoral students who have advanced to candidacy with permission of program director.

ANTH-CODAA

Course Level: Graduate

ANTH-COSAA

Course Level: Graduate

ANTH-COSENM

Course Level: Graduate