ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-640
Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include issues such as social inequality, urban nature, militarism and state violence, reading/resisting neoliberalism, and Southwest archaeology. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: graduate standing in anthropology or permission of instructor.

ANTH-640
001
ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Climate Justice

This course explores the causes and consequences of catastrophic climate change and what can be done about it. This course begins by looking at the problems with fossil fuels and how to keep them in the ground. Students examine the role of great wealth and financialization in blocking beliefs and actions around climate change. Students ask who profits and who pays the price? Students explore unequal power, cultural differences in making meaning and building institutions, and social justice. The course concludes with a look at fake solutions, possibly helpful practices, and inspiring struggles in several parts of the world. Meets with ANTH-640 901.

ANTH-640
001
ANTHROPOLOGY
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Ethnographic Writing

This seminar explores the craft, art, and politics of ethnographic writing through intensive ethnographic research, writing, and reading. Students conduct a semester-long ethnographic study and produce frequent writing assignments while dissecting exemplary ethnographic texts from anthropology and related disciplines, including sociology, investigative journalism, narrative nonfiction, fiction, radio, and film. The seminar is particularly interested in the importance of ethnography and its potential as a force for social change in the era of big data.

ANTH-640
901
ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Climate Justice

This course explores the causes and consequences of catastrophic climate change and what can be done about it. This course begins by looking at the problems with fossil fuels and how to keep them in the ground. Students examine the role of great wealth and financialization in blocking beliefs and actions around climate change. Students ask who profits and who pays the price? Students explore unequal power, cultural differences in making meaning and building institutions, and social justice. The course concludes with a look at fake solutions, possibly helpful practices, and inspiring struggles in several parts of the world. Meets with ANTH-640 001.