ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-640
Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include issues such as social inequality, urban nature, militarism and state violence, reading/resisting neoliberalism, and Southwest archaeology. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: graduate standing in anthropology or permission of instructor.

ANTH-640
001
ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Anthropology and Queer Theory

Queer theory is now in its third decade of cultural critique. This course examines questions such as how effectively cultural anthropology and archaeology have made use of the queer paradigm; what does the queer critique of color have to say to anthropology's interests in anti-racist struggles and social justice projects; and what anthropology can learn from queer interrogation of post-colonial theory, of language and sexuality, of temporality, and of heteronormativity.

ANTH-640
002
ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Anthropology of Militarism

This seminar explores anthropological and other approaches to understanding militarism as a phenomenon and related phenomena of war, violence, imperialism, militarization, and the military industrial complex. The course focuses on militarism in the contemporary United States but provides tools and theoretical foundations for understanding militarism globally and historically. The seminar particularly uses U.S. military bases abroad and their broad sociocultural, economic, political, and environmental effects as a lens for understanding militarism. Other key topics include the global war on terror, the U.S-led wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, global transformations in capitalism, the competition for scarce natural resources, and strategies for demilitarization and peacebuilding.

ANTH-640
001
ANTHROPOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Anthropology of Conservation

The seminar brings together social theory and ethnographic case studies in order to examine the ways that environmental conservation remakes spaces and bodies. Students discuss what changing conservation paradigms does to indicate who has agency and responsibility for environmental stewardship as well as the kinds of contributions the analytical perspective of anthropologists can make to conservation practice. Themes addressed include regimes of natural resource management, creating environmental affect, and the ethnography of conservation organizations.

ANTH-640
002
ANTHROPOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Media Activism and Anthropology

This course uses a political economic framework to explore media activism (broadly defined) around the world in the context of current social movements. It also challenges students to ask how anthropologists can become better newsmakers and public intellectuals in an era of neoliberal corporate media consolidation.

ANTH-640
901
ANTHROPOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Anthropology of Conservation

The seminar brings together social theory and ethnographic case studies in order to examine the ways that environmental conservation remakes spaces and bodies. Students discuss what changing conservation paradigms does to indicate who has agency and responsibility for environmental stewardship as well as the kinds of contributions the analytical perspective of anthropologists can make to conservation practice. Themes addressed include regimes of natural resource management, creating environmental affect, and the ethnography of conservation organizations. Open only to Anthropology Master's International Program students. Meets with ANTH-640 001.

ANTH-640
902
ANTHROPOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Current Issues in Anthropology (3)

Media Activism and Anthropology

This course uses a political economic framework to explore media activism (broadly defined) around the world in the context of current social movements. It also challenges students to ask how anthropologists can become better newsmakers and public intellectuals in an era of neoliberal corporate media consolidation. Open only to Anthropology Master's International Program students. Meets with ANTH-640 002.