FRENCH

FREN-433
French Topics (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics taught in French including French politics; French society; French cinema; the Francophone novel; the short story in the Francophone world; Algerian colonization and decolonization; autobiography; cinema, literature, and society; humor and irony in French literatutre; French perception of America; etc. Usually offered every term. Meets with FREN-633. Prerequisite: FREN-323 or permission of instructor.

FREN-433
001
FRENCH
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

French Topics (3)

Albert Camus: His Art, Political Philosophy and Ethics

This course provides an overview of some fictional and non-fictional works which stand as a watershed in his oeuvre. Camus' centennial prompts a revisit to some of the major political and historical forces which helped shaped his aesthetic. Such forces are the conflict between the Arab world and the pieds-noirs; Camus' controversial stance on Algeria's fight for independence; his role in the French resistance during World War II; his friendship and quarrel with Sartre; his notion of revolt; the theme of exile; the dialectic between his lyricism and the absurd which inform his writing. All is examined in works such as L'Etranger, La Peste, L'Exil et Le Royaume, Le Mythe de Sisyphe, and Chroniques Alg'riennes. Meets with FREN-633 001.

FREN-433
002
FRENCH
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

French Topics (3)

Youth, Culture and the Media in Francophone Africa

While the industrialized world is faced with the challenge of the aging of its population, the majority of the populations in African countries are under the age of 20. This youthful African population, however, is not always seen as a great opportunity; it is sometimes considered a risk. In this course, students explore the portrayal of youth in Francophone African literature, cinema and music. This course addresses what types of relationship exist between the youth and political/religious power; from Dakar to Tunis, from Djibouti to Kinshasa, young people's dreams and fears about the future, and how they express them; and how they manage to find a voice in an environment where various obstacles try to force them into silence. Among others, students study cultural identity and the challenge of modernity, popular culture, and the struggle for African unity, music, sports and national identity, youth, digital media and political change. Meets with FREN-633 002.

FREN-433
001
FRENCH
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

French Topics (3)

Cinema, Literature, Society

This course examines the cultural confrontations in two artistic forms: literature and cinema, as shaped by (and shaping) social, historical, and political factors. Through an exploration of cinematic techniques of motion picture masterpieces from the 1930s to the present, in conjunction with the study of selected French novels and plays, students examine the social, political and cultural evolution of France. Both formal and social-contextual methods of reading is explored. Special attention is paid to the conflict between individual and social forces, the metamorphosis of form and content. Introductory and supplementary information is provided in the form of lectures so that students may gain a more complete perspective on the cultural trends of each period. Meets with FREN-633 001.

FREN-433
002
FRENCH
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

French Topics (3)

Etude de Genre: Le Roman

This course studies the evolution of the novel from the 18th Century to the nouveau roman. Significant novels are analyzed as samples of a genre developing techniques and as a reflection of certain aspects of social and intellectual life. Students examine the metamorphosis of the novel in relation to the evolution of contemporary ideas on language, psychology and the aesthetic of mimesis. Meets with FREN-633 002.