GENERAL EDUCATION

GNED-140
General Education Area 4 Topic (1-3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Special topics offered periodically for General Education credit in Foundational Area 4.

GNED-140
001
GENERAL EDUCATION
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

General Education Area 4 Topic (1-3)

Cultural Foundations of Italian Politics

Following the intensive 3-week summer living and learning experience in Rome, this first-year seminar for entering freshmen on the cultural foundations of Italian politics continues on-campus in the fall semester. The course has an international and comparative perspective and includes the cultural, artistic, religious, and historical foundations of Rome and its many and evolving political systems and its continuing influence throughout history, as well as Italian political institutions and sites. Open only to students in the Cultural Foundations of Italian Politics Program. Meets with GNED-110 002 GNED-120 001 GNED-130 001.

GNED-140
002H
GENERAL EDUCATION
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

General Education Area 4 Topic (1-3)

U.S. Law and Legal Systems

This course provides students with a general introduction to the study of the U.S. legal system and the practice of law. Students learn how the U.S. legal system operates, explore various areas of civil and criminal substantive law, and debate the pressing legal issues of our time. Additionally, the course offers the unique opportunity to explore the foundations of U.S. law by using Washington, D.C. as a laboratory; students engage in experiential learning activities by attending lectures and events at D.C. courts, government agencies, and non-governmental organizations. Open only to students in the AU Scholars Program.

GNED-140
003H
GENERAL EDUCATION
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

General Education Area 4 Topic (1-3)

Social Media and Social Change

The growth of social media such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and others has dramatically changed how people communicate, collaborate, and mobilize, thereby transforming the relationship between individuals and their surrounding communities, elective mediated affinities, and the state. The culture of blogging, twittering, and Yelping has transformed the way people interact with the public sphere. On the one hand, there is a profound democratization of access to public speech thanks to these technologies; on the other hand, new hazards to the individual, from cyberbullying to surveillance and the end of privacy, have also accompanied the rise of social media. This course examines the interplay between society and social media through academic texts, online resources, videos, guest lectures and field trips. Issues covered include the economy, the environment, feminism, immigration, military actions, and same-sex marriage. Open only to students in the AU Scholars Program.