GOVERNMENT

GOVT-396
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Prerequisite: minimum 2.5 GPA.

GOVT-396
F01L
GOVERNMENT
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Power and Money

Volatile energy prices, the rise of China, the fall of the euro, cybersecurity, systemic risk, global organized crime, and the 2016 elections? The course starts with a short novel, some political economy classics, and the continuing Keynes-Hayek debate over the proper role of government. The course then is able to approach the current and emerging issues of power and money from theory- and policy-oriented perspectives: the Ivory Tower, Wall Street, Main Street, the Arab Street, and more.

GOVT-396
003
GOVERNMENT
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Building Political Institutions after the Arab Spring

This course explores theoretical perspectives on democratization and institution building with a focus on the latest wave of constitution-making in the post-Arab Spring. The class has two major elements: in-class theoretical instruction and an out-of-class assignment on constitution writing. Instruction focuses on the major aspects of constitutional design, constitutional law and democracy: the separation of powers; electoral systems; presidentialism vs. parliamentarism; federalism; judicial review; and development of civil rights and liberties. As a final project, the class is divided into several groups which applies democratization and comparative constitutional design theories to reconsider new and more democratic constitutions for countries from the most recent wave of new constitutions worldwide.

GOVT-396
004
GOVERNMENT
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Comparative Politics of the Middle East

To understand the contemporary constellation of regime-types, conflict, authority structures, and state-society relations in the Middle East, this course draws upon the theoretical insights and methodologies of comparative politics to examine politics in the region, concentrating on a few case studies. It examines both the success of the powerful in the region and the resistance of opposition groups.

GOVT-396
002
GOVERNMENT
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Inequality

Rising incomes among the richest Americans and stagnating incomes for middle class Americans have contributed to the salience of inequality as an issue in American politics. This course considers what social scientists know about inequality and several competing accounts of its causes and consequences from both empirical and normative points of view. Readings include both contemporary works of social science and classic works of political theory on this topic.

GOVT-396
006
GOVERNMENT
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Human Nature, Justice and Necessity: Thucydides'

One of the greatest works in the history of political thought, Thucydides' History has influenced thinkers from Plato to Hobbes to Nietzsche to Heidegger. This course is a close reading of his text with a view to gaining clarity about the title subjects--human nature, justice, and necessity--as well as freedom, the role of rhetoric in democracy, and, of course, war.