GOVERNMENT

GOVT-696
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

GOVT-696
001
GOVERNMENT
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Introduction to Research Design

This course teaches students a range of methods of inquiry and how to design their own research projects. It covers a basic introduction to the philosophy of science, the construction and testing of theories through observation and experiments, design and validity of research questions, causal inference, operationalization and measurement of variables, and case selection and sampling issues. It also introduces students to a range of qualitative methods, including ethnographic case studies, Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA), and archival and media research to complement the quantitative methods students learn in other courses. Students critique research and write and present a project meeting professional standards in the social sciences. Prerequisite: admission to Ph.D. program or permission of the director of doctoral programs.

GOVT-696
002
GOVERNMENT
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Campaign Finance

Money in politics is one of the most consistently controversial and compelling topics in American elections. Fundamental issues of free speech, government regulation and public participation in the democratic process are all central to campaign finance policy and law. This rigorous course explores campaign finance in federal elections and public policy. This course examines how American campaign finance policy has evolved, the intersection of policy and law, and considers how money and politics are important in campaigns and governing. Few other areas of American politics and law have evolved as substantially as campaign finance in recent years. This course provides a unique opportunity to learn about an area that is politically, practically, and academically essential to the democratic process. Meets with GOVT-496 002.

GOVT-696
004
GOVERNMENT
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Communism and Capitalism in East Asia

This course focuses on the practice of communism and capitalism in East Asia, as well as its implications for the political and socioeconomic development in this region. More specifically, this course examines the major functions of political and economic systems, processes, and changes in East Asia (two systems of China, two systems of Korea, Japan, and Singapore). Major contemporary issues and policies of the East Asian systems are also surveyed, with particular emphasis on how each government enhances its regime's claim to political legitimacy. Meets with GOVT-432 003.

GOVT-696
001
GOVERNMENT
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Tocqueville's America and the Meaning of Modernity

This course analyzes the nature of American democracy, the meaning of modernity, and the interplay between the United States and the shaping of the modern world. It consists of systematic reading of Tocqueville's Democracy in America and later writings, writings by other astute observers of America and the modern condition, deep reflection of what exactly modernity is, and analysis of ways to promote democracy's and modernity's good aspects and check their bad ones. Themes include the nature of democracy, progress, and modernity; materialism v. spiritualism; and the idea of American exceptionalism. Meets with GOVT-496 001.

GOVT-696
003
GOVERNMENT
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Political Economy of Globalization and Inequality

This seminar reviews literature devoted to explaining the unequal distribution of resources and power in developing world cases, with particular attention given to structural features of the region's economies, the configuration of social and political interests and the distributive impact of different combinations of public policies. Perspectives from political economy and political sociology are deployed in an effort to understand and explain changes in income and resource distribution. Although Latin America provides the geographic focus of the course, the class engages broader currents of thinking about how inequalities arise and persist over time, both in that region and elsewhere, in the context of increasingly integrated economic systems characteristic of the era of globalization. Meets with GOVT-496 003.

GOVT-696
002
GOVERNMENT
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Political Opinion in the United States

This course examines Americans' political beliefs and attitudes as well as the reasons why they hold the views they do. Topics include party identification and ideology; political knowledge and rationality; historical trends; and social and media influences on opinion. Students also design, implement, and analyze an opinion survey. Meets with GOVT-496 002.

GOVT-696
005
GOVERNMENT
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Conduct of Inquiry IV

Increasingly, social science research uses causal inference and experimental designs to build and test hypotheses in and outside of the field. These experimental and field designs have special considerations outside of the standard econometric framework. The focus of this course is causality in the lab, the field and observation. The course has a strong field methods component and is split into two sections. The first section introduces the Rubin Causal Model, and then examines how it applies in laboratory experiments and in quasi-experimental set-ups (instrumental variables (IV), regression discontinuity designs (RDD), and matching). The second part focuses on methods in the field (surveys, survey experiments, behavioral experiments, and field experiments) and applying these to students' own research designs. Students should be fluent with ordinary least squares (OLS) and generalized linear model (GLM). Prerequisite: admission to PhD program or permission of instructor.

GOVT-696
004
GOVERNMENT
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Inequality and Democracy

Does economic inequality threaten the institutions of representative democracy, and if so, how is the threat best understood? Students explore the moral assumptions underlying these urgent questions by interpreting and evaluating texts by political philosophers including Aristotle, Rousseau, Locke, Tocqueville, and Marx, as well as contemporary authors including John Rawls, Robert Nozick, Charles Murray, and Thomas Piketty. Meets with GOVT-496 004.