UNIVERSITY HONORS

HNRS-300
Honors Colloquium in Arts and Humanities (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: permission of University Honors program director.

HNRS-300
001H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Arts and Humanities (3)

Ludwig Wittgenstein's Philosophy: Early, Middle, and Late

Wittgenstein was the originator of three main strands in modern philosophy, each aimed at eliminating confusion and paradox in our thinking: the search for logical form, the analysis of language, and the identification of deep assumptions. Profoundly self-critical, he continued to develop and refine his insights throughout his life. After a survey of his remarkable life and the Viennese world of his youth, this course briefly touches on his early work (Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus) as a prelude to study of his later philosophy in the Philosophical Investigations and On Certainty. Though Wittgenstein was equally absorbed by the problems of mathematics, the course concentrates on those that have a strong psychological import. Topics include meaning, rule following, understanding the minds of others, mental concepts like thinking and expecting, the nature of perception and the role of color words, and the role of hidden presuppositions in shaping our thoughts and actions.

HNRS-300
002H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Arts and Humanities (3)

Music and the Mind

This course explores the mental mechanisms by which music is created, listened to, and ultimately enjoyed. The course connects recent advances in psychology, neuroscience, music, and evolutionary biology to understand the sophisticated cognitive systems underlying this universal human art form and explores questions including how our brains convert raw sound waves (essentially molecular vibrations in the air) into meaningful musical concepts such as dance beats, catchy melodies, and consonant chords, and why there are no human cultures where music isn't made.

HNRS-300
003H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Arts and Humanities (3)

Latin American Documentaries

Drawing on performance, film, and photography, this course analyzes the ways in which contemporary documentary works from Argentina, Chile, Peru, and Mexico engage discourses of human rights, history, and the law. Situating analysis around contextually specific human rights concerns and legal initiatives, the class explores the unique capacities and limits of the documentary genre in making truth claims, presenting evidence, and promoting historical accountability. The kinds of affective strategies artists employ to create compelling counter-narratives of history, nation, and identity rights are also examined.

HNRS-300
004H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Arts and Humanities (3)

Untold History of the United States: Oliver Stone's Films

This course uses Oliver Stone's feature films and the documentary film series Untold History of the United States to explore how the controversial filmmaker has interpreted the history of U.S. empire/national security state. The course compares Stone's interpretation with those of scholars and features prominent guest speakers, including Stone, who participated in key events.

HNRS-300
005H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Arts and Humanities (3)

Advanced Writing: Creative Nonfiction

In this intensive prose writing course, students define, study, write, and revise examples of "creative nonfiction," a broad term that encompasses many different forms of composition. Those forms invite both the use of memoir and the kinds of research that provide the foundation for literary journalism. The class spends time on generative writing exercises and in workshops in which students sharpen the ability to consider critically both their own work and their classmates'.

HNRS-300
002H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Arts and Humanities (3)

American Conservatism

This course examines the origins of modern conservatism, its self-defined values and mission, its enduring appeal to ordinary people, and the ebb and flow of its influence on American life. In focusing on the emergence and development of modern right-wing perceptions, ideology, and activities, the course redefines accepted ideas about America's political Left and Right. It challenges the notion that liberal institutions have been at the center while conservative forces have been on the periphery of American politics.

HNRS-300
003H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Arts and Humanities (3)

Rebellious Women in the Francophone World

This course introduces students to twentieth and twenty-first century cultural productions by women from France, Belgium, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Senegal, and former Indochina. The class explores women's take on gender, race, class, religion, national identity, history, and memory. Students also engage with critical notions of ecriture feminine, Negritude, Creolisation, and post-colonial thought from a women's perspective.

HNRS-300
004H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Arts and Humanities (3)

Reading Food: Identity, Power, and Representation

This course is an exploration of the many meanings food can carry, in a smorgasbord of genres and cultural contexts. While what we eat may seem a matter of personal choice, looking closely at food makes us recognize how enmeshed we are in cultural, economic, and political forces. A food memoir can explore an identity both individual and collective; a cookbook can offer insight into a '60s commune; a bento box can be read as a technology for becoming Japanese; and sugar can tell a history of slave trade. The course is both international and interdisciplinary in focus.

HNRS-300
001H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Arts and Humanities (3)

Oral Histories of the Civil Rights Movement

This course surveys 1960s civil rights movement figures and instructs students in oral history techniques. Students conduct a tape-recorded interview with a 1960s civil rights figure to construct an oral biography.