JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

JLC-413
Topics in Law and Social Science (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Topics include various disciplinary perspectives of law such as politics of law, law and anthropology; and the social scientific approach to specific areas of law, such as punishment and society, and law, technology, and society. Usually offered every spring. Prerequisite: JLC-203.

JLC-413
001
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Law and Social Science (3)

Crimmigration

This course explores the criminalization of immigrants in the United States. Using a socio-historical approach, the class discusses how immigration laws and immigrant experiences in the United States have changed over the last two centuries. Specific topics covered include, but are not limited to, immigrant offending and victimization, undocumented immigration, and the application of a criminal justice model to the American immigration system.

JLC-413
002
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Law and Social Science (3)

Labor, Law, and U.S. Capitalism

As the rise of capitalism has commodified productive labor, U.S. law has developed to regulate both the sale and conditions of labor. With attention to the evolution of the labor process under American capitalism and the political struggles surrounding power in the workplace, this course takes a socio-historical approach to examining issues of labor and the law. Historical examples considered include slavery's relationship to industrial capitalism, the absence of socialism in the United States, immigration's impact on the labor market, unpaid student internships, and the demise of full-time employment in the twenty-first century.

JLC-413
003
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Law and Social Science (3)

Foundations of Knowledge

This methodology course helps students identify what actually counts as knowing something in their study of social phenomena. Social scientists, lawyers, and philosophers must grapple with the question of what counts as a fact that actually describes what they believe they are observing. Making this decision inevitably affects one's understanding of what is being observed. This course examines the foundations of empirical, analytical, critical, and other modes of thought in order to enable them to evaluate the various methods used to study social institutions. Meets with JLC-604 001.