JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

JLC-496
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

JLC-496
002
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

The Rule of Law and Due Process

A commitment to rule of law and due process of law is a defining feature of Western legal tradition, but what do these phrases mean? This course examines common interpretations and applications of these concepts in diverse systems of law. The central features and historical development of legal procedures in the criminal justice, civil justice, and administrative systems are compared. Legal procedure is an essential component of systems of jurisprudence and provides the methods and means for applying substantive law. It also reveals, inter alia, a legal system's values, priorities, and applications. Meets with JLC-603 001.

JLC-496
003
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Advanced Topics in the Law

This course examines three broad areas of jurisprudence: U.S. constitutional law; international law; and current topics such as intellectual property, corporate, health, and environmental law. The course also focuses on selected elements of legal research, writing, and advocacy. The pedagogy of the course presumes the student has a basic understanding of judicial review, case law, statutory or regulatory interpretation, federalism, and the federal separation of powers.

JLC-496
E01L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Torture in Counterterrorism

Throughout history, torture has been used for multiple purposes: as a mechanism within formal legal systems, as a tool to control the lower classes, and as a covert tactic that has survived even when its practice has been contested or outlawed. Today, most democratic countries have outlawed torture and outwardly condemn it. However, even "civilized" states that denounce torture widely practice it. This course discusses the history of torture and physical punishment, changes in the practice over time, and the problem of torture today. The course focuses on a range of issues relating to torture including: what constitutes torture, attitudes about torture, the efficacy of using torture, concerns about torture especially in the context of counterterrorism, and why torture persists despite arguments against it.

JLC-496
F01L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Terrorism in the 21st Century

Since September 11th, terrorism is been increasingly a focus for the public, academics, government, and policy makers. While terrorism has been used for millennia, the tactics and technologies of terrorism are constantly evolving. This course focuses specifically on terrorism around the world in the 21st century. Students discuss a range of issues relating to 21st century terrorism including: the impact of 9/11 on global terror, changing nature of terrorist organizations, shifting tactics and goals of terrorism, and the evolution of technologies of terror including both weaponry and the use of social media. Meets with JLC-696 F02L.

JLC-496
N01
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Prison: Is Orange New Black?

Students examine women, crime, and imprisonment as presented in popular media-in particular, the series, Orange is the New Black-in concert with an examination of the scholarly research on these topics. Meets with JLC-696 N01.

JLC-496
002
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Race Issues in Justice

Race and justice are inextricably linked. From institutionalized racism on both global and domestic scales to de facto and de jure segregation, profiling in criminal justice, and environmental justice, among other topics, this course explores racism in its varied forms through a justice lens, tying the historic to the present and how these two impactful concepts relate to public policy.