LITERATURE

LIT-733
Special Topics in Literature (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Focuses on thematic and theoretical approaches to literature that traverse historical periods and national boundaries. Offered irregularly.

LIT-733
001
LITERATURE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Topics in Literature (3)

Transnational Cinema

The permeable nature of the contemporary nation has complicated our understanding of international cinematic production, distribution, and exhibition. While traditional national cinema studies have demonstrated the effects of politics, economics, and finance on a particular text; what about when these are multiplied, both at levels of production and spectatorship, for example, The Motorcycle Diaries, a film about an Argentine traveling across Argentina, Chile, and Peru, starring a Mexican, directed by a Brazilian, with financing from the United States, Germany, and France; or Looper, a joint U.S.-Chinese production which does not outwardly seem so. This seminar explores the breadth of theoretical and cultural perspectives on the complex state of contemporary international cinema.

LIT-733
001
LITERATURE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Topics in Literature (3)

The Practice of Diaspora

The study of African American literature and culture has benefited greatly from pursuing intellectual inquiry across national borders, defining blackness in fruitfully complicated ways by following the multidirectional physical and cultural dispersal of Africans throughout the so-called New World. This course takes up and interrogates this scholarly practice of diaspora by focusing on the themes of migration, memory, and absence within diaspora theory, exploring those key terms as they inform and are informed by readings of innovative literary texts by authors from the United States, West Africa, and the Caribbean. The class takes measure of both the productive claims and the complicating pitfalls of these theories of social and cultural movement and uses them to understand the literary and cultural practices of writers of African descent as they cross the Atlantic and the Caribbean to the U.S. metropolis (and back again).