PHILOSOPHY

PHIL-485
Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including medical ethics, philosophy of language, advanced philosophical argumentation, philosophy of reason and passion, bio-ethics, and post-modernism. Usually meets with PHIL-685. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: PHIL-105 or permission of instructor.

PHIL-485
001
PHILOSOPHY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Marxism

This course is about Marx and his followers in nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students begin with Marx's philosophical writings, with a particular focus on the Philosophical Manuscripts and the German Ideology. Adorno, Macuse, Gramsci, Althusser, Sartre Laclau andMouffe, Derrida, and Zizek, Lacan are the main Marxists studied. Meets with PHIL-685 001.

PHIL-485
002
PHILOSOPHY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Philosophical Views of Habit

Given the role of habit in addiction, self-deception, ignorance, and moral numbness, "habit" seems to be synonymous with "bad habit" and dangerous, or base, in principle. However, philosophical analyses of our capacity to make and break habits also involve discussions of knowledge, embodiment, and language. If we are creatures of habit, then the idea of what that means can lead to important questions in moral psychology and many other fields. In this course, a few major theories of habit ae discussed, including Aristotle and his discussion of human excellence, as well as concepts of meaning and truth in American Pragmatism, German and French phenomenology, and twentieth century structuralisms. Ultimately, students engage in nuanced discussions of contemporary problems that we inhabit, quite literally, in feminist reflections on oppression, ignorance, stereotypes, and implicit bias. Meets with PHIL-685 002.

PHIL-485
003
PHILOSOPHY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

The Idea of Nature

The terms nature and natural are basic concepts that shape modern attitudes about food, recreation, politics, and ecology; yet they remain notoriously difficult to define. This course surveys the historical evolution of philosophical thinking about nature from ancient to modern sources, along the way exploring some of the main differences between Euro-American ideas about nature and their counterparts in Islamic, Indigenous, and East Asian cultures. The central focus of this seminar style course is the role that ideas about nature have played in modern political philosophy (i.e., natural rights, natural reason, and the state of nature posited by Locke, Hobbes, Rousseau, and many others). Meets with HNRS-300 002H.