INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-619
Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including international economic policy coordination, emerging capital markets, international environmental policy, political risk analysis, international relations of Japan, preventive diplomacy, United States and Cuba, and nonviolence. Usually offered every term.

SIS-619
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Dialogue: Approaches & Applic

This course explores different theories and approaches to dialogue as a conflict transformation framework. It focuses on various types of identity-based conflict and the use of dialogue approaches and tools to transform and change the dynamics of ethnic, religious, and cultural conflicts. Interfaith, interethnic, and intercultural dialogue processes and case studies are explored and examined, especially their design, process, and possible impact.

SIS-619
004
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Peace Education

This advanced seminar provides students with an overview of peace education in terms of the main theories, concepts and methods associated with the field. The course covers basic definitions of peace and conflict resolution along with approaches such as nonviolence, cross-cultural understanding and peacebuilding. The process of learning emphasizes cooperative engagement and respect for diversity to create peaceful learning communities. The importance of values for social justice, ecological balance and global awareness is affirmed.

SIS-619
005
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Kurds: Social, Cultural, and Political Identity

Protracted ethno-political conflict in the Middle East often finds belligerents aligned across frontiers delineated on the basis of socially constructed identities, both within and across artificial political boundaries. This course examines research on communal identity (e.g. tribal, ethnic, religious/sectarian and national) in order to provide a context for understanding political, economic and socio-cultural developments in the contemporary Middle East. The frontiers of the greater Kurdistan region are examined in detail, placing the Kurds in comparative context with their frontier counterparts in Iran, Iraq, Syria, and Turkey.

SIS-619
006
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Post-War Peacebuilding

This course considers strategic approaches to peacebuilding and conflict resolution interventions using case studies from several post-conflict regions.

SIS-619
008
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Negotiation Analysis and Skills

The ability to understand how a particular negotiation is unfolding and the skill to change its course for the better are important strategic interpersonal skills. This course provides theory and practice for developing both the analytical and behavioral aspects of one's negotiation skills, while making a link between personal skills, inter-communal, and international conflict contexts. While the analytical component of the course provides students with the tools to understand a diverse array of bargaining situations, the prescriptive component focuses on integrative, value-creating strategies that help achieve mutually-satisfying outcomes and elegant solutions to shared problems. Simulations and seminar discussions are used to illustrate analytical elements and practice new negotiation methods.

SIS-619
010
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Economics of Violence and Peace

This course examines political economic issues concerning war and peace, including civil war, terrorism, and insurgency. Taking a broad view which emphasizes the interaction between economic and non-economic factors, including religion and culture, it discusses economic causes of wars, focusing on economic grievances, resources, environmental problems, and poverty; economic consequences of wars; and economic measures for conflict prevention and resolution, as well as post-conflict reconstruction.

SIS-619
011
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Peacebuilding in Africa

This course examines problems of peace and security in Africa in the post-independence period, focusing on the past 15 years. It analyzes cases from different subregions of the continent, including Liberia, Sudan, and the Congo, and assesses the efforts of regional institutions, the United Nations and outside powers to find peaceful solutions. Meets with SISU-471 002.

SIS-619
015
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Human Rights and Conflict

This course explores the increasingly relevant intersection of international human rights and conflict. It introduces students to many of the ethical and operational issues that policymakers, diplomats, human rights and humanitarian aid workers, soldiers, peace-keepers and civilian police face in responding to today's conflicts. In so doing, the course also provides students with basic understanding of humanitarian law. The class explores human rights as a cause or consequence of violent conflict; holding militaries and paramilitaries responsible for violations; peace negotiations and human rights advocacy; the truth vs. justice debate in truth commissions and war crimes trials; civil society as human rights safeguard; human rights implications of the war on terrorism; and the human rights of refugees and displaced people.

SIS-619
009
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Environmental Peacemaking

The focus of the emerging interdisciplinary field of environmental peacemaking is to identify ways that the environment, natural and human, provides opportunities for building bridges of collaboration between conflicting parties. In this course, students deal with concepts from ecopolitics, environmental security studies, international relations, and conflict resolution and develop an understanding of the theoretical framework informing the emerging environmental peacemaking paradigm. It also touches upon the nascent field of environmental peacebuilding, with its focus on relationship-building between conflict actors. The course examines the interactions among violence, conflict, peace, security, and the natural environment. It is structured to create the context for students to address questions including what impact violent conflict has on the environment; is environmental degradation itself a source or trigger of violent conflict; and how environmental cooperation can be used to promote peace and sustainable development. Meets with SISU-465 001.

SIS-619
014
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Spirituality and Global Politics

Examines the application of spirituality to global politics with particular emphasis on how modalities of faith and belief which transcend narrowly sectarian concerns promote peace and conflict resolution. Includes the historical significance of faith and belief on contemporary issues in global politics, content and process of spirituality, and consciousness in social action.

SIS-619
018
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Conflict in Africa

This course is a historical and analytical overview of conflict in Africa. This course begins with conflict in pre-colonial Africa and the advent of colonialism, and is concerned with an exploration of theories regarding the causes of conflict in Africa, ranging from the economic and social impact of colonialism, political culture, ethnic divisions, greed and grievance, etc. Two recent major conflicts in Africa are analyzed with respect to these theories. Finally, possibilities for peace in Africa are addressed.

SIS-619
019
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Global International Relations Theory

This foundation course approaches international relations theory with an interdisciplinary perspective and presents the major paradigms existing in the field. It sets normative and analytical definitions of priorities and goals and establishes the boundaries of the field. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
020
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

History of Global Politics

This course provides historical context on change and continuity in the global political system. It examines the rise, fall, and evolution of the political units that have comprised the system, including city-states, empires, and socio-cultural political units such as world religions as well as the modern nation-state and addresses how each of these different forms of political units have affected the practice of global politics across the centuries. The course compares parallel sub-global systems of politics common before the contemporary era of interconnected global politics, particularly politics within the European state system to those in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Finally, the course takes a historical perspective on change and continuity in the variety of actors and organizing structures in global politics to assess how conceptions of global society, norms, and values as well as power and self-interest have shaped peace, conflict, prosperity, and development across history. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
021
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Foundations of Global Security

This foundation course provides students with a survey of the main theories and concepts related to international security and considers a range of historical and contemporary cases. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
022
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Foundations of Global Governance

As transnational challenges intensify, the question of whether states and societies can cooperate effectively has become central. An array of formal international and regional organizations and less formal governance efforts have developed as a response. This course examines the complex interactions among these governance efforts and national governments, individuals and civil society. It considers the challenges and constraints facing global governance and multilateralism and identifies newer and emerging forms that are more attuned to the needs and demands of the twenty-first century. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
028
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Political Risk Analysis

Political risk analysis techniques allow practitioners to gauge the political conditions that would be beneficial or harmful to investment and other activities. This methodology course covers approaches to political risk analysis and applications.

SIS-619
023
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Concepts and Cases in Security Studies

This course explores some of the major concepts and theories in security studies. Among other questions, the class discusses the causes and dynamics of war, nuclear and conventional deterrence, alliance theories, military doctrines, and civil-military relations. These ideas are applied to cases of war and conflict. The course culminates with a comprehensive case study project.

SIS-619
024
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Insurgency and Counterinsurgency

In an age of globalization but unequal distribution of economic resources and political power, insurgencies pose one of the greatest challenges to the established order, whether that order is a democracy, monarchy, dictatorship or theocracy. This course analyzes the historical roots of insurgencies and counterinsurgencies, beginning with the Roman Empire, and assesses the causes, conduct, and consequences of these actions, with an emphasis on applications since World War II. Though military aspects are included, the principal focus is on the political, economic, and social forces that have informed and directed insurgents and those who oppose them. Through an understanding of the history of this complex and often misinterpreted field, students seek to define the issues these movements pose and create a framework to assess the factors that precede their rise and shape their outcome.

SIS-619
031
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Transnational Crime and Terrorism

Transnational criminals and terrorists interact, particularly in conflict regions and regions of frozen conflict. Terrorists in many regions of the world depend on organized crime to finance their activities and provide them logistical support. This course examines the diverse forms of interaction of transnational crime and corruption, with the relationship of these different groups to the state a central part of the analysis. The class looks at the security, human rights, and social consequences of this interaction.

SIS-619
029
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Migration and Security

Few issues pose as significant a challenge to states as international migration does, affecting nearly all critical aspects of governance. The myriad ways that immigration and refugee flows affect state interests, both material and idealistic, creates highly contentious politics where domestic interests clash and defining a national interest is an elusive quest for the state. This course offers students a broad overview of migration and refugee dynamics, and identifies those aspects most challenging to state governance. This includes understanding the factors that generate migration and refugee flows, as well as the politics they generate, both international and domestic. The course examines the security implications (broadly defined) of global migration and refugee flows, including defense, homeland security, and economic and societal dimensions. It also considers carefully the human rights implications of these dynamics. The course also examines policy development over the past half-century in a comparative perspective with an eye towards identifying new challenges and generating questions for future research.

SIS-619
035
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Islam and Human Rights

Human rights tenets are deeply embedded in the religious vision of Islam. This course examines human rights as a value and norm in international relations and of Islam as a constituent of political culture. It explores the wealth of information dealing with the issue from the Quranic discourse, the Prophetic tradition, Muslim scholars' interpretations, modern humanism perspectives, international law documents, independent scholars' findings, and official and non-official declarations by the United Nations and other organizations. Questions explored include what people in Muslim cultures think about human rights and why; how Islam influences the understanding of human rights in Muslim societies; is there an antithesis between Islam as a religion and the value of human rights; and how proposals for a particularly Islamic conceptualization of human rights are evaluated.

SIS-619
036
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Afghanistan's Political Transition: 2014 Elections and Beyon

Afghanistan is scheduled to hold its third Presidential election on April 5, 2014. President Karzai is not eligible to run, making it the first democratic transition of power in Afghanistan's long history. This takes place thirteen years after the historic Bonn Agreement ended the Taliban's reign and replaced it with constitutional democracy. The election also coincides with the withdrawal of international combat troops and a reduction in international aid that has funded much of the Afghan economy. How Afghanistan handles this political transition to new presidential leadership will have a profound impact on regional stability and in many ways provides a verdict on whether the United States and its allies' enormous sacrifices of troops and money were wisely spent.

SIS-619
030
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Civil War, Intervention, and Peacekeeping

Civil wars such as the ongoing conflict in Syria constitute both the most common and the most deadly form of armed conflict in the contemporary international system. This seminar introduces students to the study of civil war by addressing the following questions: what causes civil wars to break out; what can third-party actors such as international organizations, neighboring countries, or major powers do to stop them; and what tools and strategies do outside actors have at their disposal to prevent a possible relapse into conflict once a peace settlement has been reached. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on critical evaluation of competing answers to these questions that have been advanced in the academic literature, both theoretically and through a series of case studies.

SIS-619
038OL
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Big Data and Text Mining in International Affairs Research

This online course helps students understand the tools and techniques used in contemporary analysis of large-scale unstructured textual data with applications for international affairs and a range of social science research topics. While the concept of Big Data is relative, and how it is defined varies from field to field, text-based data is perhaps the largest single source of data available to the modern investigator. This includes numerous genres of textual data, from email archives, websites, twitter feeds and other social media, blog posts, speeches, annual reports, published articles, and much more. In the aggregate, these sources can easily run into thousands and thousands of discrete items. This form of Big Data is particularly challenging to the analyst using only traditional forms of content analysis. In this course, students learn techniques to help them begin to see the power of computational approaches to the large-scale analysis of unstructured text-based data. Essentially, this course helps to find the proverbial needle in the international affairs data haystack.

SIS-619
037
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Political Economy of Oil and Energy

Oil is the single most valuable commodity traded on global markets. This course explores the industry's many impacts on politics and economics, including: a history of international oil markets; Dutch disease and the resource curse; the relationship between oil, authoritarianism, and civil wars; the role of the rentier state; oil's influence on international warfare; global energy governance (e.g., OPEC, IEA); political differences within OPEC; U.S. energy policy and energy security. The course focuses primarily on the political economy of oil-exporters, especially those in the Middle East.

SIS-619
034
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

International Law and the Global Order

This course focuses on the role of international law in interstate relations and global order; analyzes the contribution of different international institutions in making of international law; and examines the effectiveness of international law in maintaining order in important areas of global affairs with emphasis on cases, treaties, and other documents.

SIS-619
044T
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Seminar in International Affairs

This course introduces students to, establishes a theoretical foundation of knowledge in, and provides exposure to experts in the main fields of concentration available in the graduate programs of the School of International Service: international politics, international law and organizations, international peace and conflict resolution, comparative and regional studies, international communication, international economic relations, international development, global environmental politics, and U.S. foreign policy. The course improves students' understanding of these fields of study through experiential education and active learning; immerses students in both the theory and practice of these areas through meetings with experts and site visits to relevant agencies and organizations; explores relevant career opportunities and prepares students to pursue professional careers in these fields; and develops academic and professional skills relevant to these subject areas. Prerequisite: admission to the Graduate Gateway Program.

SIS-619
039
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Global International Relations Theory

This foundation course approaches international relations theory with an interdisciplinary perspective and presents the major paradigms existing in the field. It sets normative and analytical definitions of priorities and goals and establishes the boundaries of the field. Meets with SIS-619 019.

SIS-619
040
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

History of Global Politics

This course provides historical context on change and continuity in the global political system. It examines the rise, fall, and evolution of the political units that have comprised the system, including city-states, empires, and socio-cultural political units such as world religions as well as the modern nation-state and addresses how each of these different forms of political units have affected the practice of global politics across the centuries. The course compares parallel sub-global systems of politics common before the contemporary era of interconnected global politics, particularly politics within the European state system to those in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Finally, the course takes a historical perspective on change and continuity in the variety of actors and organizing structures in global politics to assess how conceptions of global society, norms, and values as well as power and self-interest have shaped peace, conflict, prosperity, and development across history. Meets with SIS-619 020.

SIS-619
042
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Foundations of Global Governance

As transnational challenges intensify, the question of whether states and societies can cooperate effectively has become central. An array of formal international and regional organizations and less formal governance efforts have developed as a response. This course examines the complex interactions among these governance efforts and national governments, individuals and civil society. It considers the challenges and constraints facing global governance and multilateralism and identifies newer and emerging forms that are more attuned to the needs and demands of the twenty-first century. Meets with SIS-619 022.

SIS-619
045OL
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Security from Inside the State

How do politics, organizations, and the policy structures and processes inside states create conditions for peace and conflict? To what extent do regime type, the perceptions of leaders, and past history influence a state's security goals in the international system? This online course enables students to answer these questions by understanding and applying core concepts from security studies, domestic politics, and foreign policy. In other words, this course uses characteristics from inside a state as a tool for understanding security relations between states and their abilities to identify, prevent, and resolve conflict. Open only to students in the MA International Relations.

SIS-619
046OL
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Security from Inside the State

How do politics, organizations, and the policy structures and processes inside states create conditions for peace and conflict? To what extent do regime type, the perceptions of leaders, and past history influence a state's security goals in the international system? This online course enables students to answer these questions by understanding and applying core concepts from security studies, domestic politics, and foreign policy. In other words, this course uses characteristics from inside a state as a tool for understanding security relations between states and their abilities to identify, prevent, and resolve conflict. Open only to students in the MA International Relations.

SIS-619
047OL
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Politics of Global Development

This online course offers examination into to the field of international development through examining the history, theory, and current approaches towards alleviating poverty and global inequality. The course focuses especially on who decides, how decisions are made, and what the impacts are of development strategies on the environment and on the most vulnerable members of society and emphasizes critical analysis of the central assumptions and power relations that have influenced the field, and resulting discourses, policies, programs, and political arrangements. The course explores what development means, how to measure it, and how to understand attempts to balance between economic, ecological, and equity concerns; engages the key propositions that emerge in contemporary international development debates, and offers frameworks for evaluating theories, interventions and policies; and offers a foundation for uncovering and assessing social structures, institutions, inequalities, and development policies as theories meet practice. Open only to students in the MA International Relations.

SIS-619
001
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Global International Relations Theory

This foundation course approaches international relations theory with an interdisciplinary perspective and presents the major paradigms existing in the field. It sets normative and analytical definitions of priorities and goals and establishes the boundaries of the field. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
002
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

History of Global Politics

This course provides historical context on change and continuity in the global political system. It examines the rise, fall, and evolution of the political units that have comprised the system, including city-states, empires, and socio-cultural political units such as world religions as well as the modern nation-state and addresses how each of these different forms of political units have affected the practice of global politics across the centuries. The course compares parallel sub-global systems of politics common before the contemporary era of interconnected global politics, particularly politics within the European state system to those in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Finally, the course takes a historical perspective on change and continuity in the variety of actors and organizing structures in global politics to assess how conceptions of global society, norms, and values as well as power and self-interest have shaped peace, conflict, prosperity, and development across history. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Foundations of Global Governance

As transnational challenges intensify, the question of whether states and societies can cooperate effectively has become central. An array of formal international and regional organizations and less formal governance efforts have developed as a response. This course examines the complex interactions among these governance efforts and national governments, individuals and civil society. It considers the challenges and constraints facing global governance and multilateralism and identifies newer and emerging forms that are more attuned to the needs and demands of the twenty-first century. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
005
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

European Union and Global Governance

This course explores and analyzes the many ways in which the European Union (EU) has engaged with the world and has shaped global governance across a range of issue areas. The course begins by exploring the concept of global governance along with an introduction to the EU. The general analytical frameworks of global governance will then be applied to a series of case studies on issue areas in which the EU has been engaged in the wider world, including international trade, the global financial framework, international human rights and humanitarian issues, and regulatory policy.

SIS-619
007
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Energy and Security in Eurasia

This course explores an important driver of international relations and national security, the connection between energy and security. Europe is a large and growing energy market, increasingly depending on imported resources. The course provides a strategic overview of European energy security, the current and potential future role for Eurasian energy supplies, as well as different scenarios for long-term energy solutions.

SIS-619
009
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Insurgency and Counterinsurgency

In an age of globalization but unequal distribution of economic resources and political power, insurgencies pose one of the greatest challenges to the established order, whether that order is a democracy, monarchy, dictatorship or theocracy. This course analyzes the historical roots of insurgencies and counterinsurgencies, beginning with the Roman Empire, and assesses the causes, conduct, and consequences of these actions, with an emphasis on applications since World War II. Though military aspects are included, the principal focus is on the political, economic, and social forces that have informed and directed insurgents and those who oppose them. Through an understanding of the history of this complex and often misinterpreted field, students seek to define the issues these movements pose and create a framework to assess the factors that precede their rise and shape their outcome.

SIS-619
010
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

The Law of War

This course examines the law regulating the conduct of war and other armed conflicts, including the history and development of the law. Special attention is given to how the law of armed conflict has been employed, challenged, changed, or modified during the United States' ongoing untraditional war against a transnational non-state actor. Students grapple with the same questions that confront practitioners and policy-makers on some of the most interesting and controversial issues of our time, such as detention policy, drone warfare, status of participants to the hostilities, and preemptive force.

SIS-619
011
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Leadership of Global Organizations

This course gives students an understanding of public affairs and its role in achieving the strategic objectives of an organization. All organizations--business, government, non-government (NGO)--operate in a larger environment, in which individuals, groups and other organizations can affect their ability, positively or negatively, to meet these objectives. The role of public affairs is to monitor the external environment and to manage the organization's response to it. The mission of the public affairs function is to further the organization's strategic objectives while maintaining its legitimacy or "license to operate" among its stakeholders.

SIS-619
012
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Migration and Security

Few issues pose as significant a challenge to states as international migration does, affecting nearly all critical aspects of governance. The myriad ways that immigration and refugee flows affect state interests, both material and idealistic, creates highly contentious politics where domestic interests clash and defining a national interest is an elusive quest for the state. This course offers students a broad overview of migration and refugee dynamics, and identifies those aspects most challenging to state governance. This includes understanding the factors that generate migration and refugee flows, as well as the politics they generate, both international and domestic. The course examines the security implications (broadly defined) of global migration and refugee flows, including defense, homeland security, and economic and societal dimensions. It also considers carefully the human rights implications of these dynamics. The course also examines policy development over the past half-century in a comparative perspective with an eye towards identifying new challenges and generating questions for future research.

SIS-619
014
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Political Risk Analysis

Political risk analysis techniques allow practitioners to gauge the political conditions that would be beneficial or harmful to investment and other activities. This methodology course covers approaches to political risk analysis and applications.

SIS-619
015
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Refugees, Migration, and Trafficking

In an increasingly mobile world, millions of people are on the move, crossing international borders, or relocating within their own country's political boundaries. These movements are brought on by the search for employment, better wages, and higher standards of living; to escape persecution and violence; and as a consequence of the network of commercial human exploitation that involves the buying and selling of people for prostitution, forced labor, domestic service, irregular inter-country adoption and transnational marriages. Using an international and global perspective, this course explores some of the issues arising out of this voluntary and forced migration of people who are labeled refugees, internally displaced persons (IDPs), trafficked persons, temporary laborers, or more broadly as migrants. It lays emphasis on the important laws, international institutions, and actors that respond to questions of migrants, refugees and human trafficking, e.g., International Organization for Migration (IOM); the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC); and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR; the experiences of these three categories of mobile populations; the contributions and problems of humanitarian assistance that respond to them; and how these categories of people relate to questions and concerns of international security

SIS-619
016
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Security Simulations

This course explores the contemporary and historical use of simulated environments for the study of security phenomena. Three broad eras or generations are defined: first, kriegspel and related forms of security visualization (seventeenth to early twentieth centuries); second, computer simulation and augmented reality exercises (mid-twentieth century to present); and thirdly, procedural rhetoric, persuasive gaming, and critical simulation studies. Readings and class discussions focus on relating these eras to the security concerns and paradigms of their respective international relations contexts through focused case studies, as well as on reviewing applicable studies on the broader topics of simulation, virtualization, and mediaization.

SIS-619
018
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Transnational Organized Crime

Transnational criminals and terrorists interact particularly in conflict regions and regions of frozen conflict. Terrorists in many regions of the world depend on organized crime to finance their activities and provide them logistical support. This course examines the diverse forms of interaction of transnational crime and corruption, with the relationship of these different groups to the state a central part of the analysis. The class looks at the security, human rights, and social consequences of this interaction.

SIS-619
020
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Peacemaking and Intractable Conflict

This course provides an in-depth analysis of both official and unofficial third party peacemaking interventions in intractable conflict, as represented by various forms of mediation and by problem-solving methods captured under the approach of interactive conflict resolution. The focus of interventions is primarily on applications of mediation and third party consultation, both separately and in combination, to violent and protracted ethnopolitical conflicts with international ramifications. In addition to discussing current issues in mediation and interactive conflict resolution, the course assesses the potential for complementarity between official (Track I) and unofficial (Track II) diplomacy through an evaluation of selected cases.

SIS-619
022
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Economics of Violence and Peace

This course examines political economic issues concerning war and peace, including civil war, terrorism, and insurgency. Taking a broad view which emphasizes the interaction between economic and non-economic factors, including religion and culture, it discusses economic causes of wars, focusing on economic grievances, resources, environmental problems, and poverty; economic consequences of wars; and economic measures for conflict prevention and resolution, as well as post-conflict reconstruction.

SIS-619
023
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Islam and Democracy

This course considers how the broad categories of "Islam" and "democracy" can intersect in contemporary world politics. After laying a historical foundation, questions of Islam and democracy are examined in the context of Islamist parties vying for power through elections, self-proclaimed Islamic states, contemporary Muslim democracies, and Muslim states grappling with democracy as a result of Western occupations. The course also highlights a variety of Muslim perspectives on the topic of democracy.

SIS-619
026
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Peacebuilding in Divided Society

This course explores various peacebuilding approaches that can be utilized in multi-ethnic and divided societies. It focuses on the three possible levels of intervention (grassroots, middle out and top down) often implemented by peacemakers in their attempts to bring change to the dynamics of deeply rooted conflict societies. As a primary case study for this course, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is critically reviewed and examined. Multiple dimensions of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, as well as the relationship between Palestinians and Jews within Israel, are investigated.

SIS-619
027
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

U.S.-Iran Conflict and Reconciliation

This course provides a basis for understanding the political, economic, and security dimensions of Iran's role in regional politics, the conflict in the U.S.-Iran relations, and reconciliation as an important factor and determinant of stability in the Middle East. Organized along historical and thematic lines from Iran being a front-line state during the Cold War to it becoming the home of an Islamic revolution, the course focuses on the issues of culture and politics, thought and practice, to elucidate aspects of tension and conflict between the U.S. and Iran and its implication for the region. Students study conflict resolution theories and explore debates in the field as applicable to the U.S.-Iran relations and look at new alternatives for dialogue and opportunities for negotiation in the process of reconciliation in a comparative historical perspective. Course includes issues of reform and radicalism, Islam as a political force, Iran's role in regional politics, and the search for new alternatives in cultural engagement and diplomacy in resolving conflict.

SIS-619
028
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Theories and Methods of Nonviolence

Examines the successes and criticizes the shortfalls of six major nonviolent struggles of the twentieth century. Students sharpen their capacity for critical thinking by applying insights from these struggles to current problems in the United States.

SIS-619
029
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Genocide and the Politics of International Law

This course approaches the question of why, despite its near universal condemnation and its legal prohibition, genocide has been allowed to be perpetrated with little or no preventive action taken. The course follows the evolution of the Genocide Convention from its conception to its original draft to its adopted text. Students perform a number of case studies and answer the question of whether treatment of the Armenians amounted to genocide and whether the Holocaust was unique. Further, students determine whether the Responsibility to Protect removes the blind spots found in the Genocide Convention and analyze the role the International Court of Justice can play in deterring state-sponsored genocide. Throughout the course, students actively work to strengthen their critical thinking, writing, and presentation skills.

SIS-619
D01
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Great Powers Politics: Diplomacy, Order, and War

In some ways, it is impossible to understand the dynamics of international security without understanding the role of great powers in international society. This course helps students to unpack and discover the critical role that great power politics plays in ordering international politics. The course is broadly divided into four sections. First, the course specifies the concept of great powers, with a focus on the sources and nature of their political influence; then the course focuses on the manner in which great powers interact with one another and the institutions used to mediate their relationships. In the third section, students are introduced to concrete examples of great power order such as the Concert of Europe, the League of Nations, and the UN. Finally, how great power discord comes about and the consequences of this discord for international security is discussed.

SIS-619
030
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Global Political Economy

This course is concerned with the scope of political economy. The focus is on the origins of the modern global political economy and its institutional structure. It examines contemporary issues in political economy, using the division of labor as an organizing concept, and explores the prospects for global restructuring at the turn of the century.

SIS-619
017
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

State Building

This course examines the distinctive challenges of state building in our time and on efforts by occupying powers, international organizations, and historical empires to construct stable governance on foreign soil. After exploring some historical cases of European and East Asian state building, the course focuses primarily on contemporary cases in Africa, Southeast Asia (Timor), and the Middle East. The primary assignment for the course is a policy paper or a research paper, allowing deep engagement with an empirical topic.

SIS-619
032
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

The Economics of Transnational Crime

The exponential growth and success of a globally-integrated economy has brought along as its most negative foil an equally fast expansion in illicit trades, including weapons, people, drugs and money. The emergence of such illegal transnational activities and their enormous profitability, constitute a major challenge to national authorities that are ill-prepared to confront them effectively within their borders. It is also essential to understand the operations and strategies of the transnational criminal groups, their flexible "business plans" and constantly adjusting organizations, and their interactions with law enforcement forces and national governments. This course explores all these elements plus the failed ways in which the criminal corporations are currently being confronted and the best alternative public policies to deal with them.

SIS-619
034
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Conflict and Development

An examination of the way in which development processes, strategies, and policies increase or decrease local, national, and international conflicts, as well as the ways in which conflicts at all levels condition development choices.

SIS-619
033
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Complex Emergencies

This course examines complex emergencies and addresses the types of responses devised by the international community. Includes case studies of complex emergencies in Sierra Leone and Kosovo.

SIS-619
035
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

History of Global Politics

This course provides historical context on change and continuity in the global political system. It examines the rise, fall, and evolution of the political units that have comprised the system, including city-states, empires, and socio-cultural political units such as world religions as well as the modern nation-state and addresses how each of these different forms of political units have affected the practice of global politics across the centuries. The course compares parallel sub-global systems of politics common before the contemporary era of interconnected global politics, particularly politics within the European state system to those in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Finally, the course takes a historical perspective on change and continuity in the variety of actors and organizing structures in global politics to assess how conceptions of global society, norms, and values as well as power and self-interest have shaped peace, conflict, prosperity, and development across history. Open only to students in the MA in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security.

SIS-619
036
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Governance, Development and Corruption

This course explores the scope of corruption around the world. It considers sources and effects of these practices, and the practical possibilities for controlling or reducing corruption, especially in African contexts.

SIS-619
031
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Conflict Prevention/Assessment

This advanced seminar provides coverage of several conflict mapping, tracking, and assessment schemes recently developed by governmental agencies, research institutes, and nongovernmental organizations in order to better understand the expression of violent conflict and to predict its potential occurrence. Conflict prevention is addressed in terms of both light, or operational prevention, and deep, or structural prevention, with an emphasis on actions that can be taken by actors in the field of conflict resolution to prevent the outbreak of violence. Major studies on conflict prevention are reviewed with a view to identifying policies and practices in both early warning and early action that can help to mainstream violence prevention in the international community.

SIS-619
037
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Identity and Politics in Middle East

This course discusses the sources of identity in Middle Eastern countries, including tribalism, nationalism, and political Islam. The course readings and discussions attempt to understand state-society relations in the region and analyze some of its most pressing problems its countries and peoples are facing. The class addresses issues related to minorities, gender, youth problems, and political change.

SIS-619
038
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Islam, Peace, and Conflict Resolution

This course presents an introduction to Islam, different schools of Islamic thought, and Islamic political movements. It also addresses sources of conflict and peaceful reconciliation that result from different readings and interpretations of Islam. The course examines present day situations in order to analyze how politics, ideas, and movements contribute to the role Islam plays in different countries, and how Islam can be used as a source of conflict resolution. The class discusses issues related to education, ethnic and religious differences, and conflict resolution in Palestine/Israel, Iraq, Syria, Bahrain, and Egypt.

SIS-619
N01L
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Principles of Economics

Overview of fundamental principles of modern economic theory. Incorporates foundational concepts of both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Concepts include efficiency, comparative advantage, market structure, market failures, unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, and balance of payments. Open only to students in the MA International Relations.

SIS-619
N02L
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Principles of Economics

Overview of fundamental principles of modern economic theory. Incorporates foundational concepts of both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Concepts include efficiency, comparative advantage, market structure, market failures, unemployment, inflation, fiscal and monetary policy, and balance of payments. Open only to students in the MA International Relations.

SIS-619
039
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Studies in International Politics (1-6)

Foundations of Global Governance

As transnational challenges intensify, the question of whether states and societies can cooperate effectively has become central. An array of formal international and regional organizations and less formal governance efforts have developed as a response. This course examines the complex interactions among these governance efforts and national governments, individuals and civil society. It considers the challenges and constraints facing global governance and multilateralism and identifies newer and emerging forms that are more attuned to the needs and demands of the twenty-first century. Meets with SIS-619 003.