INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-628
Advanced Topics in International Communication (1-3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Rotating topics include cross-cultural collaboration in global virtual teams; health and culture across borders; public diplomacy; social entrepreneurship; global innovation without frontiers; social media and cultural-political transformation; race, class, and power in international education; field research in health communication; foreign media and public opinion; managing international and intercultural programs and exchanges; health communication, disability policy and organization; cyber-conflict in global perspective; and mass media and terrorism. Usually offered every term.

SIS-628
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in International Communication (1-3)

Strategic Communication

This course explores in detail the rising importance of communication factors in international relations as a strategic instrument of foreign policy and as a source of international conflict. The course concentrates on strategic intelligence collection, including the growth of intelligence gathering technologies, information-based military operations, cyber security and vulnerabilities, and the interaction of communications with transnational actors. The course also explores the current national structures of intelligence systems and decision-making processes, the role of so-called "information operations," and basic principles in the modern, network communications basis for the command and control of military forces. Also included is a comparative examination of specific cases where communications have been a major factor in either an escalation or de-escalation of hostilities.

SIS-628
004
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in International Communication (1-3)

Global Health, Culture, and Communication

Global changes in migratory patterns, the increasing health inequalities faced by the poor in the United States and around the world, and the health risks faced by communities at the margins of global societies have drawn attention to the relevance of studying culture in order to understand health and health communication processes across global cultures. This course adopts a culture-centered approach to health communication. Using the case study method, the class examines immigrant and refugee populations in the United States and international health case studies to explore why culture matters and the values underlying health communication interventions. Effective and culturally responsive health communication requires an understanding of theoretical perspectives coupled with strategy and creativity to capture the attention of the target audience, convey a health message that resonates with the audience, and ultimately enhance individual, family, and/or community health. To this end, students learn not only important theories in this area of study but also concrete tools, such as how to develop audience-centered health messages, how to design an effective and culturally tailored health communication flyer, and how to analyze and evaluate the key elements of a media health campaign.

SIS-628
E01L
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in International Communication (1-3)

Applied Public Diplomacy

Public diplomacy is generally defined as understanding, engaging, informing, and influencing foreign publics. This online course provides an understanding of the history and dynamics of U.S. public diplomacy; knowledge of strategies and techniques for advocating policy and influencing opinion and behavior of international audiences in a Web 2.0 age; skills to communicate, especially in writing; an understanding of how to analyze key data, including opinion polls and audience surveys; and an ability to engage with the key moral, political, and practical dimensions of public diplomacy.

SIS-628
005
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in International Communication (1-3)

The Emergence of Transnational Education

As our world experiences major changes, education, too, is undergoing rapid transformation. Globalization, migration, technological innovation, intercultural conflict, global poverty, and economic crises are shaping and reshaping the nature, meaning, and deployment of education throughout the world. This course considers questions such as how and why nation-states are increasingly relying on education as a tool of statecraft, nation-branding, nationalism, and public diplomacy. By synergizing key interdisciplinary concepts from international relations, sociology, anthropology, critical theory, history, political science, and intercultural communication, the course explores contemporary education as a quintessentially transnational phenomenon with powerful implications that are simultaneously global and local. Drawing from a critical perspective, students examine the actors involved in current educational policy and practice, and consider their interests and relationships. Students also evaluate the impact of this phenomenon for global social institutions, nation-states, communities, and individuals.

SIS-628
006
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in International Communication (1-3)

Cyber Conflict, Activism and Security

The growing importance of cyber conflict poses new challenges for organizations, governments, private citizens, and the future of online communications worldwide. Restrictive online policies, such as Internet censorship, are being implemented in a growing number of countries. Likewise, news media are filled with details about electronic surveillance, espionage, computer crime, and cyber attacks. In this environment of cyber instability, this course examines the problems posed by the global dependence on the Internet and similar online systems for political, economic, and social activities and the insecurity of these systems that induce cyber attacks, surveillance, and leaks. The course examines the problems in national and global governance in balancing security and human rights. While a few technical aspects of cyberspace are covered, the course emphasizes the political, legal, and moral dimensions of these major communication and information technologies in international relations.

SIS-628
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in International Communication (1-3)

Intercultural Leadership

This course examines global leadership in cross-cultural contexts in order to develop enhanced understanding of key leadership research and best practices and the characteristics of interculturally competent global leaders. Questions such as why leaders who are successful in domestic settings sometimes fail dramatically in international/intercultural contexts, and what is different about global/intercultural leadership, are addressed.

SIS-628
004
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in International Communication (1-3)

Global and Comparative Perspectives on Public Diplomacy

This course provides an introduction to the conceptual and theoretical foundations for public diplomacy programs, new media public diplomacy initiatives, and how media outlets are used by international actors to influence global public opinion. The course covers issues and theories related to soft power, strategic communication, and media-based international relations. It reviews contemporary debates on U.S public diplomacy and the public diplomacy initiatives of other nation-states and non-state actors. The course is a comprehensive inquiry into assumptions that continue to justify and define the evolving range of policies related to public diplomacy and strategic communication.

SIS-628
005
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Topics in International Communication (1-3)

Global and Comparative Perspectives on Public Diplomacy

This course provides an introduction to the conceptual and theoretical foundations for public diplomacy programs, new media public diplomacy initiatives, and how media outlets are used by international actors to influence global public opinion. The course covers issues and theories related to soft power, strategic communication, and media-based international relations. It reviews contemporary debates on U.S public diplomacy and the public diplomacy initiatives of other nation-states and non-state actors. The course is a comprehensive inquiry into assumptions that continue to justify and define the evolving range of policies related to public diplomacy and strategic communication. Open only to International Arts Management students. Open only to International Arts Management students.