INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-653
Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Topics include substantive national security issues such as terrorism, non-proliferation, intelligence, and defense polices, as well as U.S. foreign policy toward specific regions or countries.

SIS-653
012
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Issues in Intelligence

Changes in technology, law, society, and governance are changing the business and possibilities of intelligence. On one hand, states and non-state actors have powerful new tools for surveillance, analysis, and disruption. On the other, formerly successful institutional forms find themselves unable to adjust, and public scrutiny of clandestine activities has never been greater. This course examines the theory and history of intelligence to establish a context for understanding these trends, and then explores recent events and likely developments to gain insight into the future of intelligence as a tool of state policy and a factor in international affairs.

SIS-653
011
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Diplomatic Practice

This seminar studies diplomacy in theory, history, and practice, as a political process and as an instrument of foreign policy. It covers diplomats' relations with their own governments as well as the countries in which they serve; how they use information on the politics, economics, and society of their host nation; the origin and costs of mistakes; and the future of diplomacy in an era of globalization and instant communication. It seeks to illustrate approaches to diplomacy through historical examples and contemporary case studies, linking diplomatic practice to current events.

SIS-653
013
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

U.S. Defense Politics

This seminar examines how U.S. defense and national security policy is influenced by international relations, organizational interests, and domestic politics. The class looks at the history of a particular defense issue and uses the relevant theories and approaches to analyze, discuss, and probe contemporary issues in U.S. defense policy, including such persistent problems as acquisition reform, funding defense, the role of private military contracts, and changes in warfare, among other issues. Through the course assignments, students also learn how to ask and pursue interesting research questions and write a critical literature review.

SIS-653
002
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Transnational Security Challenges

What sorts of transnational security challenges do nation states face in the information age, and how do they manage these threats? Global threats such as nuclear proliferation, climate change, environmental degradation, refugee streams, or infectious diseases do not stop at national borders. Terrorist and criminal networks not only transcend international borders, but also go beyond traditional state jurisdictions and stove-piped hierarchies. This course analyzes the nature of the challenges, and look at the policy, legal, and institutional mechanisms the United States and other countries have found/must find to manage and counter these threats.

SIS-653
014
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Bioterror in the Twenty-first Century

This course examines the potential for bioterror attack. In this twenty-first century globalized world, the proliferation of biotechnology and a new wave of terror have combined to set the conditions for an increasingly likely attack using weapons of mass destruction (WMD) including biological weapons. The course also introduces the science behind biological weapons, examines U.S. government efforts to prepare for and respond to a bioterror attack, and investigates the policy implications of this emerging threat.

SIS-653
006
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

U.S. Foreign Policy toward Latin America

This course examines U.S. foreign policy towards Latin America by focusing on the factors that shape U.S. foreign policy. The course considers the extent to which U.S. policy is shaped by the nature of the U.S. impact on Latin America.

SIS-653
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

National Security Resources

This course examines in detail how the federal government determines the budgets for defense, foreign policy, homeland security, and intelligence. It also analyzes how the executive and congressional processes for allocating national security resources affect national security itself.

SIS-653
008
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Countering Terrorism

This course focuses on terrorism and how to counter it, utilizing case studies from multiple regions. Students may focus their research on an area of interest.

SIS-653
010
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Continuity and Change in U.S. Foreign Policy

This course examines continuities and incongruities in U.S. foreign policy since 1789, with the greatest emphasis on the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. It includes extensive use of primary documents.

SIS-653
001
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Continuity and Change in U.S. Foreign Policy

This course examines continuities and incongruities in U.S. foreign policy since 1789, with the greatest emphasis on the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. It includes extensive use of primary documents.

SIS-653
004
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

National Security and Proliferation

The possibility of nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons (WMD) falling into the hands of terrorists or criminal networks is perhaps the gravest threat to U.S. national security. This course examines the particular hazards associated with each threat and what the United States is doing to defend against these threats. The course also explores the history of illicit trafficking in WMD and the prospects for the future proliferation.

SIS-653
005
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Public Diplomacy

Public diplomacy is generally defined as understanding, engaging, informing, and influencing foreign publics. This course provides an understanding of the history and dynamics of U.S. public diplomacy; knowledge of strategies and techniques for advocating policy and influencing opinion and behavior of international audiences in a Web 2.0 age; skills to communicate, especially in writing; an understanding of how to analyze key data, including opinion polls and audience surveys; and an ability to engage with the key moral, political, and practical dimensions of public diplomacy.

SIS-653
006
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

U.S. National Security Strategy

This historically-oriented course examines how the United States has sought to protect and promote its national security since the founding of the country. After a brief examination of early U.S. strategy, the bulk of the course investigates trends in American strategy since the beginning of the twentieth century. The last part of the course assesses President Barack Obama's national security strategy and a variety of ideas for addressing contemporary security challenges.

SIS-653
008
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Countering Terrorism

This course focuses on terrorism and how to counter it, utilizing case studies from multiple regions. Students may focus their research on an area of interest.

SIS-653
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Technology and National Security

This course examines the impact of science and technology on relations between nations, as well as the history of science and technology policy in order to gain an understanding of measures that have historically been employed to manage these issues. The course employs the use of case studies (including nuclear energy, biotechnology, and unmanned aerial systems) to understand the state of several technologies, the current control measures that govern these areas and consider the adequacy of these measures now and in the future. Meets with SISU-463 001.

SIS-653
007
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

U.S. Policy Toward South Asia

South Asia (India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Bhutan) may be the most volatile region in the world, with ongoing conflicts and two large countries possessing nuclear weapons. This course examines both the history of U.S. relations with the countries of South Asia and current issues in U.S. policy towards the region as a whole. The course also explores the domestic and international constraints that affect U.S. policy toward South Asia.

SIS-653
D01
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

US Relations with Israel and Palestine

This course explores the evolution of U.S. relations with both Israel and Palestine, from the establishment of the Jewish state in 1948 to the present day. Along the way, the course examines key milestones in America's policy toward Israel/Palestine, from President Truman's controversial decision to buck the U.S. foreign policy establishment and formally recognize the state of Israel to the U.S. role in Israeli-Palestinian peacemaking. The course analyzes throughout how a combination of sentimental, domestic political, and strategic factors have led to the formation of a wholly unique bilateral relationship between the U.S. and Israel characterized at once by both tight bonds and inherent tensions. At the same time, the course analyzes the complicated, uneven relationship between the U.S. and the Palestinians, including its tepid support for the Palestinian Authority in the West Bank and opposition to Hamas' militant approach toward Israel in the Gaza Strip.

SIS-653
010
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

US/Russia Post-Cold War Relations

This course examines recent history and the current state of relations between the United States and the Russian Federation, focusing on enduring themes, ideas, and strategic cultures of each country in order to develop a deeper understanding of the existing tensions and future tendencies. The course covers issues of nuclear arms control, non-proliferation, expansion of NATO, trade relations, energy and environmental security, regime change, and human rights. Conflicts over Kosovo, Chechnya, and most recently Georgia are analyzed in their historical context. The course emphasizes the role of ideas, leaders, and empathy in international relations.