INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-653
Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Topics include substantive national security issues such as terrorism, non-proliferation, intelligence, and defense polices, as well as U.S. foreign policy toward specific regions or countries.

SIS-653
012
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Issues in Intelligence

Changes in technology, law, society, and governance are changing the business and possibilities of intelligence. On one hand, states and non-state actors have powerful new tools for surveillance, analysis, and disruption. On the other, formerly successful institutional forms find themselves unable to adjust, and public scrutiny of clandestine activities has never been greater. This course examines the theory and history of intelligence to establish a context for understanding these trends, and then explores recent events and likely developments to gain insight into the future of intelligence as a tool of state policy and a factor in international affairs.

SIS-653
011
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Diplomatic Practice

This seminar studies diplomacy in theory, history, and practice, as a political process and as an instrument of foreign policy. It covers diplomats' relations with their own governments as well as the countries in which they serve; how they use information on the politics, economics, and society of their host nation; the origin and costs of mistakes; and the future of diplomacy in an era of globalization and instant communication. It seeks to illustrate approaches to diplomacy through historical examples and contemporary case studies, linking diplomatic practice to current events.

SIS-653
013
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

U.S. Defense Politics

This seminar examines how U.S. defense and national security policy is influenced by international relations, organizational interests, and domestic politics. The class looks at the history of a particular defense issue and uses the relevant theories and approaches to analyze, discuss, and probe contemporary issues in U.S. defense policy, including such persistent problems as acquisition reform, funding defense, the role of private military contracts, and changes in warfare, among other issues. Through the course assignments, students also learn how to ask and pursue interesting research questions and write a critical literature review.

SIS-653
002
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Transnational Security Challenges

What sorts of transnational security challenges do nation states face in the information age, and how do they manage these threats? Global threats such as nuclear proliferation, climate change, environmental degradation, refugee streams, or infectious diseases do not stop at national borders. Terrorist and criminal networks not only transcend international borders, but also go beyond traditional state jurisdictions and stove-piped hierarchies. This course analyzes the nature of the challenges, and look at the policy, legal, and institutional mechanisms the United States and other countries have found/must find to manage and counter these threats.

SIS-653
014
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Bioterror in the Twenty-first Century

This course examines the potential for bioterror attack. In this twenty-first century globalized world, the proliferation of biotechnology and a new wave of terror have combined to set the conditions for an increasingly likely attack using weapons of mass destruction (WMD) including biological weapons. The course also introduces the science behind biological weapons, examines U.S. government efforts to prepare for and respond to a bioterror attack, and investigates the policy implications of this emerging threat.

SIS-653
006
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

U.S. Foreign Policy toward Latin America

This course examines U.S. foreign policy towards Latin America by focusing on the factors that shape U.S. foreign policy. The course considers the extent to which U.S. policy is shaped by the nature of the U.S. impact on Latin America.

SIS-653
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

National Security Resources

This course examines in detail how the federal government determines the budgets for defense, foreign policy, homeland security, and intelligence. It also analyzes how the executive and congressional processes for allocating national security resources affect national security itself.

SIS-653
008
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Countering Terrorism

This course focuses on terrorism and how to counter it, utilizing case studies from multiple regions. Students may focus their research on an area of interest.

SIS-653
010
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Continuity and Change in U.S. Foreign Policy

This course examines continuities and incongruities in U.S. foreign policy since 1789, with the greatest emphasis on the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. It includes extensive use of primary documents.