INTERNATIONAL SERVICE

SIS-653
Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Topics include substantive national security issues such as terrorism, non-proliferation, intelligence, and defense polices, as well as U.S. foreign policy toward specific regions or countries.

SIS-653
001
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

National Security Resources

This course examines in detail how the federal government determines the budgets for defense, foreign policy, homeland security, and intelligence. It also analyzes how the executive and congressional processes for allocating national security resources affect national security itself.

SIS-653
003
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Countering Terrorism

This course focuses on terrorism and how to counter it, utilizing case studies from multiple regions. Students may focus their research on an area of interest.

SIS-653
004
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Diplomatic Practice

This seminar studies diplomacy in theory, history, and practice, as a political process and as an instrument of foreign policy. It covers diplomats' relations with their own governments as well as the countries in which they serve; how they use information on the politics, economics, and society of their host nation; the origin and costs of mistakes; and the future of diplomacy in an era of globalization and instant communication. It seeks to illustrate approaches to diplomacy through historical examples and contemporary case studies, linking diplomatic practice to current events.

SIS-653
005
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Issues in Intelligence

Changes in technology, law, society, and governance are changing the business and possibilities of intelligence. On one hand, states and non-state actors have powerful new tools for surveillance, analysis, and disruption. On the other, formerly successful institutional forms find themselves unable to adjust, and public scrutiny of clandestine activities has never been greater. This course examines the theory and history of intelligence to establish a context for understanding these trends, and then explores recent events and likely developments to gain insight into the future of intelligence as a tool of state policy and a factor in international affairs.

SIS-653
007
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Bioterror in the Twenty-first Century

This course examines the potential for bioterror attack. In this twenty-first century globalized world, the proliferation of biotechnology and a new wave of terror have combined to set the conditions for an increasingly likely attack using weapons of mass destruction (WMD) including biological weapons. The course also introduces the science behind biological weapons, examines U.S. government efforts to prepare for and respond to a bioterror attack, and investigates the policy implications of this emerging threat. Meets with SISU-463 001.

SIS-653
009
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

Transatlantic Security

This course examines the evolution of trans-Atlantic security policy and defense planning. It begins with a review of the formation of NATO and of trans-Atlantic defense policy and military force planning through the Cold War to the breakup of the Soviet Union. The course then focuses in some detail on the transformation that trans-Atlantic security relations have undergone, in particular the shift of NATO's focus from defense of European territory to expeditionary operations outside its boundaries and the European Union's assuming a strong role in defense planning.

SIS-653
010
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

U.S. Foreign Policy toward the Middle East

This course provides students with a detailed understanding of the history of America's relations with the countries of the greater Middle East as well as of current issues in United States policy towards the region. The course not only analyses the Arab-Israeli issue in depth, but also explores the domestic and international constraints which affect overall U.S. policy toward the Middle East.

SIS-653
001
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

SIS-653
005
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

SIS-653
008
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)

SIS-653
002
INTERNATIONAL SERVICE
FALL 2016

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy (3)