INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE

SISU-419
Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section. Rotating senior capstone topics focusing on international studies. May be taken A-F only. Prerequisite: International Studies major and at least 75 credits.

SISU-419
005
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Violence in Cities: Global Perspective

This capstone seminar investigates the causes and trends of different types of violence in contemporary urban settings. Students learn about cities' trajectories from relatively safe to violent, as well as cases in which urban violence has decreased. The seminar's scope is both global and local, including in-depth analyses of cities such as Washington, DC and Baltimore but also Ciudad Juarez, Karachi, Managua, and Nairobi, among others. Students produce a major research paper, which they develop methodologically and empirically as the seminar progresses. Basic knowledge of descriptive and inferential statistics as well as qualitative methods (interviews, focus groups, archival work, ethnographic approaches) is required. The seminar includes field trips and primary data collection.

SISU-419
004
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Intelligence and National Security Decisionmaking

While examining historic and contemporary issues in U.S. national security and foreign policy, this course explores the nexus of analyst-policymaker interaction, challenges to sound decisionmaking, and the art of transforming research methods, research designs, and academic-style writing into executive-style outputs. Students prepare written analyses employing the bottom line up front technique as well as verbally present and defend their work. Students also work in teams, mimicking the day-to-day collaboration that exists in today's workplace. Students identify a topic of current interest and focus deeply on it while keeping abreast of general developments in U.S. national security and foreign policy. The analytic work is estimative--students explore the likelihood of future developments and implications for the United States. Students also peer review each other's work along the way, offering constructive comments for consideration.

SISU-419
002
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Narcotrafficking in Mexico

This course looks at the drug trade in Mexico. Although Mexico has always exported drugs into the United States, the drug trade changed substantially in the 1990s. Drug trafficking groups grew more sophisticated and more violent and kidnapping, extortion, and murder tallies all increased during the 2000s. The course introduces students to this complex trade by tracing the trade and shifts in it through the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The devastating impacts of narcotrafficking on the country's political system, its social and cultural fabric, and its economic organization are also examined.

SISU-419
007
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Global Innovation without Frontiers

This course focuses on European perspectives on global innovation, the knowledge-based economy, and new strategic competition from emerging markets. The dynamic European innovation economy is compared with the United States in terms of innovation approaches, policies and business environments. Through class preparations students design a research strategy for investigation of distinctive national/regional paths to innovation and technology transfer in sectors such as: information and communication technologies, new media and digital media technologies, aerospace, defense technologies, biotechnology, biopharmaceuticals, and nuclear energy.

SISU-419
009
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

The Global Challenge of Disability-Inclusive Development

The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was adopted in 2006 and became the first human rights treaty of the twenty-first century. The CRPD is a comprehensive, rights-based, approach to addressing the myriad challenges facing persons with disabilities. In 2011, the World Bank and World Health Organization produced the first ever World Report on Disability, which argued that more than a billion people in the world are living with some form of disability. This course explores the potential for a disability-inclusive global development agenda. It includes a focus on some of the key regional strategies, such as the Incheon Strategy to "Make the Right Real" for persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific developed by the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP), and the role of information and communication technologies to facilitate socio-economic development and inclusive educational practices around the world.

SISU-419
010
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Ethnic Cleansing and Genocide in Comparative Perspective

Designed as a comparative and interdisciplinary inquiry, this course looks at the ways historical context, political realities, and cultural components enable ethnic cleansing and genocide to happen. Cases studied include the Herero genocide, the Armenian genocide, the Rape of Nanking Massacre, the Holocaust, the Cambodian genocide, the Rwandan genocide, ethnic cleansing and genocide in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the Sudan genocide.

SISU-419
012
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Post-Cold War U.S. Foreign Policy and Diplomacy

This course explores international flashpoints in the post-Cold War period, with emphasis on challenges U.S. foreign policy faces in the next decade and the role of diplomacy in managing them. The course looks at past conflicts, ongoing disputes, and potential eruptions. Some of these crises demonstrate effective diplomacy and offer positive guidance for the future; others provide lessons on what not to do. A primary goal of the course is to acquaint students with major foreign policy challenges in the immediate future, provide a framework in which to incorporate additional knowledge going forward, and impart lessons learned in the effective use of diplomacy to resolve or manage conflict. The course also examines how the United States government makes foreign policy, with a focus on the State Department, but with due consideration for other actors, including the Pentagon, CIA, National Security Council, and White House. Students gain experience exercising essential skills of a foreign policy practitioner, including the ability to provide focused oral briefings, succinct written products, and more lengthy written policy analysis.

SISU-419
003
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Rise of China and the Global Economy

Over the past two decades, China has experienced a dramatic economic transition and extremely rapid growth, lifting nearly half a billion of its people out of poverty. At the same time, this ongoing transformation has had a far-reaching impact on the rest of Asia and the world. This course provides an overview of China's economic reforms as well as their impact on regional and global growth, employment, income distribution and inflation, the battle for natural resources, the structure of world trade and capital flows, and the process of global economic policy-making. With this as background, students undertake guided research, examining key challenges facing China going forward and tracing out potential implications for the global economy.

SISU-419
006
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

From Agriculture to Agribusiness: Political Economy of Food

Agriculture as a sector is unparalleled in its importance to the economy and society. While human societies have existed without agriculture, it is only with agriculture that we get complex divisions of labor, industry, commerce, and extensive cultural production. Because of its central importance to social stability and economic well-being, governments from the time of the Pharaohs have sought to control, promote and manipulate agricultural development in myriad ways. This course examines how agricultural development interacts with public policy, economic, and environmental change. Key themes explored include the role of the state in promoting certain agricultural models, international trade policy and agriculture, the relationship between agricultural development and industrialization, and the emergence of new agricultural paradigms in response to the failures of industrial agriculture. Case studies exploring these themes are drawn from across the world.

SISU-419
008
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Alternatives to Violence

Against the many forms of violence: military violence, economicviolence, domestic violence, verbal violence, sexual violence, racial violence, governmental violence, alternatives do exist. The purpose of this course is to examine them: when, where, and why they work. The course is discussion-based, with all viewpoints welcomed.

SISU-419
001
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

Environment, Conflict, and Peace

Students examine the theoretical linkages and political mechanisms at play between the environment, natural resources, and the causes, dynamics, and effects of conflict and peace. Key questions explored include, does environmental degradation lead to violent conflict; is resource scarcity or resource abundance a risk factor for violence; what are the environmental consequences of war; and whether addressing environmental problems can be used as a peace-building tool. Structured as a seminar, students participate dynamically by making presentations, working in groups, etc.

SISU-419
009
INT'L SERVICE UNDERGRADUATE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Senior Capstone: International Studies (3)

The United States and International Human Rights

Since 1941, United States attention to human rights abuses has risen and waned. Students explore how concern for human rights has influenced United States foreign policy and raise questions about the consistency and durability of that commitment throughout the Cold War and in the years that followed the Soviet Union's collapse. The course concludes with an examination of contemporary struggles to balance morality and adherence to "American values" with the preservation of national security. The assigned readings and class discussion help students define human rights and assess the American commitment to protect those rights. Students consider how the geopolitical struggle of the Cold War and domestic politics shaped American concern for human rights internationally and examine the challenges of combating terrorism and respecting human rights today. To this end, students read important accounts by historians, political scientists, journalists, and human rights activists. The objectives of this course are to promote critical, analytical thinking about United States human rights policy and to encourage students to develop their own interpretation of the evolution and significance of the American commitment to human rights in the postwar years.