WASHINGTON SEMESTER

WSEM-496
Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

WSEM-496
001T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

American Political Behavior

This course provides students with an understanding of the core concepts in American political behavior, beginning with some central topics including elections, voter turnout, and other forms of political participation. The course continues by examining how people make their voting decisions. Students conduct exit polls on Election Day and apply concepts and skills developed in the course.

WSEM-496
002T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Transforming Communities in Environment/Development Sem I

This interdisciplinary transforming communities in environment and development seminar introduces students to community change at local, national, and global levels. The course encourages students to consider what makes a community and which key actors exert influence over and create change in communities. The class explores topics including development, inequality, conflict, education, species and habitat conservation, environmental sustainability, and climate change through lectures, guest speakers, and site visits.

WSEM-496
003T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Transforming Communities in Environment/Development Sem II

This interdisciplinary transforming communities in environment and development seminar introduces students to community change at local, national, and global levels. The course encourages students to consider what makes a community and which key actors exert influence over and create change in communities. The class explores topics including development, inequality, conflict, education, species and habitat conservation, environmental sustainability, and climate change through lectures, guest speakers, and site visits.

WSEM-496
004T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Transforming Communities in Environment/Development Res Proj

In this course, students complete an original research paper pursuing a question of interest to them with relevance to environment, development, or community social change issues. Projects are substantive and involve both primary and secondary research.

WSEM-496
005T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Transforming Communities in Environment/Development Intern

Students engage in a two-day-per-week internship providing direct professional experience in social change, advocacy, policy, or related organizations.

WSEM-496
001T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Sustainable Development Seminar I

Students are introduced to community change at local, national, and global levels. The course encourages students to consider what makes a community and which key actors exert influence over and create change in communities. Students explore topics including development, inequality, conflict, education, species and habitat conservation, environmental sustainability, and climate change through lectures, guest speakers, and site visits. Prerequisite: admission to the Washington Semester program.

WSEM-496
002T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Sustainable Development Seminar II

Students are introduced to community change at local, national, and global levels. The course encourages students to consider what makes a community and which key actors exert influence over and create change in communities. Students explore topics including development, inequality, conflict, education, species and habitat conservation, environmental sustainability, and climate change through lectures, guest speakers, and site visits. Prerequisite: admission to the Washington Semester program.

WSEM-496
003T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Sustainable Development Research Project

In this course, students complete an original research paper pursuing a question of interest to them with relevance to environment, development, or community social change issues. Projects are substantive and involve both primary and secondary research. Prerequisite: admission to Washington Semester program.

WSEM-496
004T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Sustainable Development Internship

Students engage in a two-day-per-week internship providing direct professional experience in social change, advocacy, policy, or related organizations. Prerequisite: admission to Washington Semester program.

WSEM-496
006T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Europe: Global Human Rights

This travel course focuses on global human rights, beginning with a comprehensive overview of human rights issues and key organizations and their intersection with U.S. foreign and economic policy. The trip includes Geneva, Switzerland, The Hague, Netherlands, and Brussels, Belgium. Topics covered include minority rights; European Union approaches to human rights; freedom of media; business; and the role of non-state actors, governments and the private-sector in shaping human rights policies and practices. Prerequisite: admission to the Washington Semester program.

WSEM-496
005T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Technological Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship

This travel course offers first hand insights into the social, economic, and political dimensions of innovation and entrepreneurship in contemporary American society. Silicon Valley embodies, for many, the birthplace of high tech innovation and future oriented business practices. But it also happens to host a significant portion of American agricultural production, a lively non-profit and cultural community, and very diverse demographics. It thus is the perfect laboratory to observe the interaction among all of these dynamics. Students gain a deeper understanding of how innovation and entrepreneurship happens in a variety of contexts. Prerequisite: admission to the Washington Semester program.

WSEM-496
010T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

The International Politics of Water

This course provides an intensive and in-depth introduction to the nature and workings of international politics of water. The course provides an overview of the many issues and concerns associated with international relations and water, from both a conceptual and geographical (e.g., North America, Europe and the Middle East) perspective. The course is augmented with lectures by invited speakers and visits to water relevant sites. The objective is to blend theoretical aspects with practical applications.

WSEM-496
008T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Sustainable Development Seminar I

Students are introduced to community change at local, national, and global levels. The course encourages students to consider what makes a community and which key actors exert influence over and create change in communities. Students explore topics including development, inequality, conflict, education, species and habitat conservation, environmental sustainability, and climate change through lectures, guest speakers, and site visits. Prerequisite: admission to the Bucknell in DC program.

WSEM-496
012TL
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

The U.S. Presidency: History and Current Controversies

This online course addresses questions including whether presidential power is the "power to persuade;" has President Barack Obama followed George W. Bush's approach to the War on Terror; and if the "unitary executive" theory is a myth. While examining these and related questions, the class also considers each president, from Washington through Obama, and studies his contributions to his own time, as well as his legacy.