WASHINGTON SEMESTER

WSEM-496
Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

WSEM-496
002T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Transforming Communities in Environment and Development Seminar I

This interdisciplinary transforming communities in environment and development seminar introduces students to community change at local, national, and global levels. The course encourages students to consider what makes a community and which key actors exert influence over and create change in communities. The class explores topics including development, inequality, conflict, education, species and habitat conservation, environmental sustainability, and climate change through lectures, guest speakers, and site visits.

WSEM-496
003T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Transforming Communities in Environment and Development Seminar II

This interdisciplinary transforming communities in environment and development seminar introduces students to community change at local, national, and global levels. The course encourages students to consider what makes a community and which key actors exert influence over and create change in communities. The class explores topics including development, inequality, conflict, education, species and habitat conservation, environmental sustainability, and climate change through lectures, guest speakers, and site visits.

WSEM-496
005T
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

Transforming Communities in Environment and Development Internship

Students engage in a two-day-per-week internship providing direct professional experience in social change, advocacy, policy, or related organizations.

WSEM-496
001TL
WASHINGTON SEMESTER
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-Recurring (1-6)

International Development: Novels, Film, and Music

This online course uses a number of non-traditional texts including novels, feature films, and music videos to examine several themes in international development, such as socialist and neoliberal models, gender in development, modernization and globalization, governance, post conflict reconstruction, and the role of a development worker. These themes are not only alive in a classroom setting, but they also impact the real lives of populations from the Global South, who oftentimes record their protest, struggle, and accomplishment in novels, films, and music. Using these works of fiction to study themes in international development gives students a unique perspective into views on development issues from the Global South. Students compare non-traditional texts from the Global South, while analyzing local, national, and international concerns from region to region. The course also uses academic material from international development texts to supplement the works of fiction.