LIT-107 FA1
Creative Writing Across Genres
CLOSED
001
 
03.00
Keplinger,D  
 
 
TF      01:10PM 02:25PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
CLOSED
002
 
03.00
Tamashasky,A  
 
 
TF      10:20AM 11:35AM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
CLOSED
003
 
03.00
Voris,L  
 
 
MTH     02:35PM 03:50PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-121 FA1
Rethinking Literature
CLOSED
001
Detective Fiction 
03.00
Dussere,E  
 
 
MTH     11:45AM 01:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Detective Fiction This class uses detective fiction as a way to approach issues that are common to literature and interpretation generally; after all, a detective is always an interpretive "reader" of the case or mystery that must be solved. Students read classic detective fiction and also variations on the form that occur in more traditionally "literary" fiction as well. Texts include authors such as Poe, Conan Doyle, Freud, Chandler, and Pynchon.
CLOSED
002
Literary Hauntings 
03.00
Rubenstein,R  
 
 
MTH     02:35PM 03:50PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Literary Hauntings Apparitions have long been a staple of fiction, perhaps since early storytellers gathered around the fire to swap spine-tingling tales. What are the sources of readers' perennial attraction to spectral beings, haunted houses, paranormal events, and things that go bump in the night? Students read a diverse selection of short stories and novels by classical and contemporary authors of ghost stories and other literary hauntings, ranging from Edgar Allen Poe, W. R. James, Henry James, and Edith Wharton to Shirley Jackson, R. K. Narayan, Susan Hill, and Toni Morrison. Students consider the elements that make such uncanny tales satisfying and deepen their understanding of the forms and variations of literary texts written to produce both dread and pleasure.
CLOSED
003
Angelheaded Hipsters & Absurd 
03.00
Voris,L  
 
 
MTH     11:45AM 01:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Angelheaded Hipsters and the Absurd This course surveys the work of the Beats and other experimental writers of the 50s and 60s including, Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Diane di Prima, Amiri Baraka and Frank O'Hara, within the postwar context of anti-Communism, consumerism, homophobia, sexism and racism. The course explores uses of the absurd in experimental writing as a response to the absurdity of the suburb, "Leave it to Beaver" norms, the Communist menace and McCarthyism, among other political and cultural trends. The course considers how jazz, drugs, sex and the visionary quest were influences on these literary movements.
OPEN
004
Literature on Silver Screen 
03.00
Brideoake,F  
 
 
TF      01:10PM 02:25PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Literature on the Silver Screen This course considers the dynamic relationship between literature and cinema throughout the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. Grounding discussions in recent studies of adaptation, the class analyzes films of canonical novels and plays as texts employing the distinctive visual language of the cinema, rather than as lesser versions of literary originals. Texts include Franco Zeffirelli's 1968 Romeo and Juliet, Baz Luhrmann's 1996 William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet, and Shakespeare's play; Jane Austen's Emma and Amy Heckerling's 1995 Clueless; Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre; and Alfred Hitchcock's Rebecca. The course includes a bi-weekly film screening.
CLOSED
006
The Monstrous Memoir 
03.00
Ratekin,T  
 
 
MTH     01:10PM 02:25PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
The Monstrous Memoir This course considers the literary memoir, in particular the "monstrous personal chronicle." The course analyzes how these texts blend the documentary and the fictional in order to respond to both the monstrosity of history and the trauma of personal experience. Authors often turn to the memoir when their subject matter is unconventional or transgressive and therefore seemingly unsuitable for the novel. The class looks at the personal chronicle as a category committed to challenging conventional boundaries through its use of singularity, rawness, and self-reflexivity. Analyzing these texts as a separate genre improves understanding of their individual meanings, their social roles, and their cultural contexts. Primary texts include Thomas De Quincy, Confessions of an English Opium Eater; Bill Clegg, Portrait of the Addict as a Young Man; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Art Spiegelman, Maus; Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast; Dave Eggers, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius; Virginia Woolf, A Sketch of the Past; and Mary Karr, The Liar's Club.
CLOSED
GE1
Sports Literature 
03.00
Ratekin,T  
 
 
MTH     10:20AM 11:35AM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Sports Literature Although the origin of sport in ancient social rituals has long been acknowledged, academic study has paid slim attention to the cultural significance of modern sport, often dismissing it as frivolous entertainment. This course explores the ways in which sports writing illustrates the profound impact of athletics on both our public myths and private fantasies. The course focuses on three particular areas: sport as a social discourse that establishes important communal ties, both challenging and reinforcing conceptions of gender, class, and nation; sport as a spiritual discourse that develops ideas of the sacred and the transcendent; and sport as a physical experience that promotes particular understandings of the body and movement. Primary texts include Friday Night Lights, The Last Amateurs, Into Thin Air, The Natural, and Hoop Dreams. Secondary readings include essays by Bourdieu, Geertz, Huizinga, Callois, and Winnicott. Students write an analysis of an actual sporting event as well as an analysis of a sports literature text.
LIT-125 FA2
Great Books: Western World
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Berry,A  
 
 
MTH     08:55AM 10:10AM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-146 FA1
Critical Appr to Cinema
CLOSED
001
 
03.00
Kakoudaki,D  
 
 
TF      01:10PM 02:25PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
W 05:30PM 08:00PM TBA TBA 01/11/16 05/03/16
 
CLOSED
002
 
03.00
Middents,J  
 
 
MTH     02:35PM 03:50PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
M 08:10PM 10:40PM TBA TBA 01/11/16 05/03/16
 
CLOSED
003
 
03.00
Ratekin,T  
 
 
MTH     08:55AM 10:10AM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
TH 05:30PM 08:00PM TBA TBA 01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-215 FA1
Writers in Print/Person
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Horne,C  
 
 
MTH     04:00PM 05:15PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
CANCELLED
002
 
03.00
Grant,S  
 
 
W       11:45AM 02:25PM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
CANCELLED
003
 
03.00
Ratekin,T  
 
 
MTH     01:10PM 02:25PM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
LIT-221
Survey of British Lit II
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Brideoake,F  
 
 
TF      04:00PM 05:15PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-225 FA1
African Literature
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Beaulieu,S  
 
 
TF      02:35PM 03:50PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-235 FA2
African American Lit
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Leonard,K  
 
 
TF      02:35PM 03:50PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-240 FA2
Asian American Literature
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Wong,L  
 
 
TF      10:20AM 11:35AM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-245 FA1
The Experience of Poetry
CLOSED
001
 
03.00
Voris,L  
 
 
TF      10:20AM 11:35AM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-246 FA1
Cinema & the Twentieth Century
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Pike,D  
 
 
TF      01:10PM 02:25PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
M 05:30PM 08:00PM TBA TBA 01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-251
First-Year Seminar
Prerequisite: first-year student.
CANCELLED
001
Virginia Woolf 
03.00
Voris,L  
 
 
MTH     02:35PM 03:50PM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
Virginia Woolf This course examines Woolf's innovation in the novel by focusing on the experimental narratives of the twenties, her critical essays, and selected literary criticism. The course explores the relation of Woolf's narrative experiment to recurrent topics including the experience of time, the nature of reality, memory, gender, and intimacy.
LIT-265 FA2
Lit & Soc in Vict Engl
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Berry,A  
 
 
MTH     11:45AM 01:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-267 FA3
Literatures of Global South
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Wong,L  
 
 
TF      02:35PM 03:50PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-281 FA2
Power, Discourse & Pop Culture
CLOSED
001
 
03.00
Berry,A  
 
 
MTH     01:10PM 02:25PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-310
Major Authors
CANCELLED
001
Milton 
03.00
Brideoake,F  
 
 
TF      08:55AM 10:10AM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
Milton In the 1630s, John Milton published poetry and prose manifestos demanding freedom of the press, divorce, bishop hating, and king-killing. His writings helped to topple the monarchy, provoking the outrage, tis Satan! This course also explores what befell of Milton once he himself joined England's new revolutionary government, whether it was paradise or paradise lost.
LIT-315
Topics in American Romanticism
CLOSED
001
Poetry: Dickinson & Whitman 
03.00
Noble,M  
 
 
MTH     01:10PM 02:25PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-343
British & European Modernism
OPEN
001
The Year 1922 
03.00
Voris,L  
 
 
T       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
The Year 1922 This course examines the cultural, intellectual and political forces that shaped the transnational explosion in literary and artistic achievement in 1922. In this banner year a slew of disruptive texts were published that came to define modernism including, Joyce's Ulysses, T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, the fiction of Mansfield and Woolf, Stein's word portraits, Vallejo's Trilce, and Rilke's Duino Elegies, alongside developments in modern art such as Dada, Art Deco, Bauhaus and German Expressionist film. Questions such as why was 1922 such an illustrious year, and how these changes influenced American national identity are reviewed. Students examine the American response including portrayals of the flapper, the Roaring Twenties and the Lost Generation, within the transnational context of post-World War I Europe. Meets with AMST-330 003.
(Meets with AMST 330 003)
LIT-346
Topics in Film
CLOSED
001
Coen Brothers in Context 
03.00
Dussere,E  
 
 
MTH     02:35PM 03:50PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
M 08:10PM 10:40PM TBA TBA 01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Coen Brothers in Context This course is devoted to studying questions of postmodernism, American history, and the history and aesthetics of cinema. Films by the Coen brothers are paired with earlier films that the Coens use as intertexts. Extensive readings include theoretical and critical essays as well as short fiction and novels.
LIT-347
Spain/Latin America Lit & Film
OPEN
001S
 
03.00
 
 
 
 
LIT-360
Topics in Medieval Literature
OPEN
001
Medieval Cities 
03.00
Pike,D  
 
 
TF      04:00PM 05:15PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Medieval Cities When we think of medieval Europe, we tend to imagine castles, woods, and villages rather than cities. But cities did exist throughout the Middle Ages and rivalled if not surpassed courts and monasteries in their production of literature, art, and philosophy. This course studies the cultures of medieval cities, focusing on four case studies, two imperial capitals at the edges of medieval Europe, Moorish Granada and Byzantine Constantinople, whose fall would mark the end of the Middle Ages, and two urban centers, Florence and Paris, whose rise would usher in the cultures of the Renaissance and of early modernity. Students examine the history, art, architecture, and culture of each city, including literature ranging from lyric poetry by Judah Halevi, Samuel HaNagid, Ibn Zamrak and Christophoros Mitylenaios, to contemporary chronicles by Anna Comnena, Michael Psellos and Villehardouin, to writings by Abelard, Boccaccio, Christine de Pizan, Dante, and Francois Villon.
LIT-367
Topics in World Literature
CANCELLED
001
Nigerian Literature 
03.00
 
 
 
TF      11:45AM 01:00PM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
Nigerian Literature This course examines a range of literary texts from Nigeria, Africa's most populous country, largest oil producer, and home to some of its most celebrated literary figures. Students become acquainted with both high and low forms of cultural production and gain an understanding of the political and social issues that Nigerians grapple with on a day-to-day basis. The class discusses issues such as oil wealth, corruption, religion, occultism, homosexuality, popular music, emigration, and piracy. There is also focus on the mega-city of Lagos, which is rapidly becoming one of the world's preeminent fictionalized cities.
LIT-400
Creative Writing: Fiction
Prerequisite: LIT-107 or permission of instructor.
CANCELLED
001
 
03.00
Perkins-Valdez,D  
 
 
TF      02:35PM 03:50PM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Grant,S  
 
 
W       11:45AM 02:25PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-401
Creative Writing: Poetry
Prerequisite: LIT-107 or permission of instructor.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Keplinger,D  
 
 
W       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-403
Creative Writing: Nonfiction
Prerequisite: LIT-107 or permission of instructor.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Oyedeji,K  
 
 
MTH     04:00PM 05:15PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-443
Adv Std in 20th Century Lit
OPEN
001
Harlem Renaissance 
03.00
Leonard,K  
 
 
TF      11:45AM 01:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s is one of the most famous literary movements in US history, generally considered to be the first major flowering of African American literary and artistic culture. This course explores the internationalism of the movement. In addition to examining how Harlem in the 1920s was a hub of African American artistry, students consider how the movement produced the originating terms for the idea of an African diasporic culture. Thus, attention is turned to how themes of mobility and exile inform the celebration of African American identity, African heritage, and cultural memory in the works of writers of African descent who moved in and around Harlem throughout the jazz age. In this way, students consider the contours of the movement's complicated articulation of a transnational blackness. Meets with LIT-443 001.
(Meets with LIT 643 001)
LIT-446
Advanced Studies in Film
OPEN
001
Film and the Human Body 
03.00
Kakoudaki,D  
 
 
TF      10:20AM 11:35AM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
W 02:35PM 05:15PM TBA TBA 01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Film and the Human Body This course explores the challenges of representing the human body on film. Working through a variety of genres and theoretical models, the course focuses on the cinematic body as a presence and as a surface, and explores how it reflects assumptions about gender, race, and sexuality, as well as cultural difference and change. The course studies the evolution of thinking about the body on film, from the indestructible bodies of classic comedies, to feminist interrogations of representation and politics, and the contemporary interest in interiority and mental and bodily states. Meets with LIT-646 001.
(Meets with LIT 646 001)
CLOSED
002
Stardom 
03.00
Middents,J  
 
 
MTH     10:20AM 11:35AM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
W 05:30PM 08:00PM TBA TBA 01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Stardom This course examines the deceivingly complex word of movie stardom, focusing on the history of the American studio system and its reliance and usage of movie stars. In examining stardom, students see how politics, economics and labor go into even the simplest readings of motion pictures. The course also explores how stardom has changed and adapted today, and what stardom means for our interpretation of current cinema. Two major research projects expected; a mandatory screening also accompanies the course. Meets with LIT-646 002.
(Meets with LIT 646 002)
LIT-480
Senior Project in Literature
Prerequisite: LIT-498.
CLOSED
001
 
03.00
Noble,M  
 
 
T       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
CLOSED
002
 
03.00
Sha,R  
 
 
W       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-490
Ind Study Project in Lit
Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.
CLOSED
000
***** Varies by Student ****** 
01.00-06.00
 
 
 
 
LIT-491
Practical Internship in Lit
Prerequisite: permission of adviser and department chair.
OPEN
001
 
01.00-06.00
Voris,L  
 
 
 
OPEN
002
 
01.00-06.00
Middents,J  
 
 
 
LIT-523
Readings in Genre: Novel
Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor.
CANCELLED
001
 
03.00
Brideoake,F  
 
 
TF      11:45AM 01:00PM  TBA  TBA    CANCELLED
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Brideoake,F  
 
 
T       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-643
Adv Std in 20th Century Lit
OPEN
001
Harlem Renaissance 
03.00
Leonard,K  
 
 
TF      11:45AM 01:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s is one of the most famous literary movements in US history, generally considered to be the first major flowering of African American literary and artistic culture. This course explores the internationalism of the movement. In addition to examining how Harlem in the 1920s was a hub of African American artistry, students consider how the movement produced the originating terms for the idea of an African diasporic culture. Thus, attention is turned to how themes of mobility and exile inform the celebration of African American identity, African heritage, and cultural memory in the works of writers of African descent who moved in and around Harlem throughout the jazz age. In this way, students consider the contours of the movement's complicated articulation of a transnational blackness. Meets with LIT-443 001.
(Meets with LIT 443 001)
LIT-646
Advanced Studies in Film
OPEN
001
Film and the Human Body 
03.00
Kakoudaki,D  
 
 
TF      10:20AM 11:35AM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
W 02:35PM 05:15PM TBA TBA 01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Film and the Human Body This course explores the challenges of representing the human body on film. Working through a variety of genres and theoretical models, the course focuses on the cinematic body as a presence and as a surface, and explores how it reflects assumptions about gender, race, and sexuality, as well as cultural difference and change. The course studies the evolution of thinking about the body on film, from the indestructible bodies of classic comedies, to feminist interrogations of representation and politics, and the contemporary interest in interiority and mental and bodily states. Meets with LIT-446 001.
(Meets with LIT 446 001)
CLOSED
002
Stardom 
03.00
Middents,J  
 
 
MTH     10:20AM 11:35AM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
W 05:30PM 08:00PM TBA TBA 01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Stardom This course examines the deceivingly complex word of movie stardom, focusing on the history of the American studio system and its reliance and usage of movie stars. In examining stardom, students see how politics, economics and labor go into even the simplest readings of motion pictures. The course also explores how stardom has changed and adapted today, and what stardom means for our interpretation of current cinema. Two major research projects expected; a mandatory screening also accompanies the course. Meets with LIT-446 002.
(Meets with LIT 446 002)
LIT-690
Ind Study Project in Lit
Prerequisite: permission of instructor and department chair.
CLOSED
000
***** Varies by Student ****** 
01.00-06.00
 
 
 
 
LIT-691
Graduate Internship
Prerequisite: graduate standing in the department, and permission of instructor and department chair.
OPEN
001
 
01.00-06.00
Dargan,K  
 
 
 
LIT-700
Advanced Fiction Workshop
Prerequisite: admission to MFA in Creative Writing.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Grant,S  
 
 
W       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Perkins-Valdez,D  
 
 
T       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-701
Advanced Poetry Workshop
Prerequisite: admission to MFA in Creative Writing
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Dargan,K  
 
 
M       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-704
Adv Creative Nonfiction Wrkshp
Prerequisite: admission to MFA in Creative Writing
OPEN
001
 
03.00
McCann,R  
 
 
TH      05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-710
The Art of Literary Journalism
Prerequisite: admission to MFA in Creative Writing program and at least 18 credits hours.
CLOSED
001
 
03.00
Fisher,M  
 
 
M       08:10PM 10:40PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-731
Teaching of Writing Practicum
Prerequisite: LIT-730 or permission of instructor.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Sha,R  
 
 
TBA     TBA              TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
LIT-732
Seminar in Literary Theory
CLOSED
001
Incredible Realism 
03.00
Rubenstein,R  
 
 
M       05:30PM 08:00PM  TBA  TBA    01/11/16 05/03/16
 
Incredible Realism Although the act of reading any literary text involves the suspension of disbelief, what does that phrase mean for texts that combine realistic and non-realistic elements, whether in the form of implausible figures, highly improbable or impossible events, uncanny doubles, ghostly presences, or "magical realism"? This seminar focuses on fiction that stretches the suspension of disbelief through its blending of credible and incredible elements. Students read theorists of the fantastic along with imaginative texts represent diverse time periods, nationalities, and literary forms and techniques.
LIT-750
Folger Sem: Renais & 18th Cent
Prerequisite: permission of department.
OPEN
001
 
03.00
Dussere,E  
 
 
 
For students accepted to the folger Seminar.
LIT-793
Directed Research in Lit
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
CLOSED
001
 
03.00
Dussere,E  
 
 
 
OPEN
002
 
03.00
Kakoudaki,D  
 
 
 
OPEN
003
 
03.00
Rubenstein,R  
 
 
 
LIT-797
Master's Thesis Seminar
May be taken SP/UP only.
OPEN
001
 
01.00-06.00
Dargan,K  
 
 
 
For MFA students.
OPEN
002
 
01.00-06.00
Dussere,E  
 
 
 
Open only to students in the MA Literature program.
CLOSED
003
 
01.00-06.00
McCann,R