newsId: 4118F133-5056-AF26-BE558D3ABD74E6E3
Title: Retiring Faculty: Philip Jacoby
Author: Sharon Hannon
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Abstract: Phil Jacoby, associate professor of accounting, retires from the Kogod School of Business after more than 40 years of teaching.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 04/24/2015
Content:

Dr. Philip Jacoby, associate professor in the Department of Accounting and Taxation, has retired after more than 40 years at the Kogod School of Business.

As a young certified public accountant (CPA), fresh from Price Waterhouse, now PricewaterhouseCoopers, in Boston, Jacoby joined American University in 1972 as an accounting instructor. Over the years, as he moved from a position as an assistant professor to eventually become the chair of the Accounting Department, a position he had for 13 years. 

Jacoby was a tireless advocate for the department and its programs, which educated hundreds of students who became CPAs, partners in the most prestigious public accounting firms, and executives in a wide variety of governmental, nonprofit, and business organizations. He was the first faculty member from Kogod to be the chair of the University Faculty Senate; he also served in the position of faculty representative to the Audit Committee of the University Board of Trustees for eight years, and was chair of the Kogod Educational Policy Committee.

But his signature accomplishment came when, as the associate dean for academic programs at Kogod, he successfully prepared the School for its initial American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation.

Over the years, Jacoby received a number of awards, including Kogod’s Faculty Award for Outstanding Service in 2006 and 2013 and several awards for excellence in research in Jungian typology, academic administration, program development, and his contributions to the accounting education literature. He is a CPA and a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the American Accounting Association.

Jacoby enjoys teaching and has taught a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses in financial accounting, managerial accounting, and auditing. To this day, Jacoby remains a true believer in the profession of accounting, where a person can have a positive impact by keeping corporate financial reporting honest so that all investors, particularly "the little guys," have a fair chance to participate in the American economic dream.

In recent years, his research has been focused on ways to contain health care costs and the internal control systems of nonprofit organizations. His areas of expertise include auditing, business ethics, fraudulent financial reporting, auditor independence, corporate governance, human resource issues in public accounting firms, accounting and business education, Jungian psychological types, and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI).

Jacoby earned his bachelor's degree in mathematics cum laude from Boston College, his master’s degree in accounting from Northeastern University, and his doctorate in business administration from George Washington University in 1980.

In retirement, Jacoby and his wife will live in Richmond where they'll be closer to their grandchildren. But his love of teaching still runs deep; he hopes to continue teaching at one of the universities in the Richmond area.

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Title: Professor Stevan Holmberg Retires from the Kogod School of Business
Author: Sharon Hannon
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Abstract: After 38 years of teaching, Professor Stevan Holmberg is retiring from the Kogod School of Business.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 04/24/2015
Content:

Dr. Stevan Holmberg, a leader in the development of the undergraduate and graduate entrepreneurship curriculum at American University, retired at the end of the spring 2015 semester. During his 38-year career at the Kogod School of Business, Holmberg served in a number of roles, including many focused on entrepreneurship.

As the founding director, he was instrumental in launching the Sustainable Entrepreneurship and Innovation Initiative, the Entrepreneurship Incubator, the Entrepreneurship Venture Fund, and an Entrepreneurship Advisory Council. With Amy Eisman from AU’s School of Communications (SOC), he jointly led the effort to start an innovative MA in Media Entrepreneurship (a joint program between SOC and Kogod) and a Kogod minor in entrepreneurship for non-business school students. He also worked with other academic units to develop a proposed new modular master’s program in entrepreneurship.

Holmberg served as acting dean of the business school for two years, as well as two separate terms as chair of the Management Department, and has been active in Kogod development initiatives, including raising funds for the new Kogod building, the Dean’s Discretionary Fund, the Entrepreneurship Initiative, the Incubator, and the Entrepreneurship Venture Fund.

He taught graduate courses in entrepreneurship and innovation; entrepreneurship practicum: new venture creation; and strategic alliances, mergers, and acquisitions and has published in entrepreneurship and management journals including International Journal of Strategic Business Alliances and Journal of Business Venturing. His recent research has focused on strategic alliances; green and clean-tech entrepreneurship in the U.S., Sweden, and Denmark; sustainability and stakeholder models; disruptive innovation in the vehicle industry; and public-private partnerships and networks.

After earning his bachelor’s degree at the University of Tulsa, Holmberg went on to earn his Master’s and Doctorate in Business Administration at Indiana University. Attracted by Kogod and American University’s culture of innovation; sense of community among faculty, staff, and students; focus on experiential education; small class sizes and individualized attention; Holmberg began his career at Kogod in 1977.

When asked about the highlights of his Kogod career, Holmberg noted three:

  • Working with the "bright, caring and wonderful faculty, staff, and students"
  • Developing the entrepreneurship initiative and working with two full-time entrepreneur Executives-in-Residence—Tommy White and Bill Bellows—as co-directors of the Incubator and with other colleagues.
  • Serving for two years as acting dean of Kogod

Holmberg plans an active "retirement" as he continues his interest in entrepreneurship by working with a number of new venture startups and incubators/accelerators. He plans to be an angel investor in new ventures and pursue his passions in the areas of green and clean-tech entrepreneurship, business, and policy. He is also looking forward to continuing his frequent visits to Sweden, Denmark, and Florida, and spending time with his family.

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Title: Michael Sampson, Creator of MS Taxation, Retires
Author: Sharon Hannon
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Abstract: Professor Michael Sampson retires from the Kogod School of Business after more than 30 years.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 04/24/2015
Content:

Professor Michael Sampson, who singlehandedly designed and put into place the Kogod School of Business' Master of Science in Taxation (MST) program, which is now ranked among the top ten such programs in the nation, has retired.

In 1983 when Sampson began his career at American University, he already had a distinguished record as an attorney, CPA, and academic at a Wall Street law firm, an international public accounting firm, and two nationally known universities. Immediately upon his appointment to Kogod, he created the MST. Rarely are academics in their first year at a university asked to so quickly create a new program, and he successfully accomplished the task in record time.

An expert in the taxation of real estate transactions, Sampson taught both undergraduate and graduate courses in taxation and business law. He also wrote several books offering guidance to people investing in real estate for the first time, as well as to experienced entrepreneurs who actively develop properties. His best-selling case book on like-kind exchange transactions offers step-by-step guidance on how to negotiate and consummate real estate exchanges in a tax efficient manner. A frequent speaker on real estate tax issues to professional groups throughout the country, Sampson’s presentations were known to reduce the mind-numbing complexity of the tax law into logical and understandable concepts that both the novice and experienced practitioner appreciated.

After earning his bachelor, Master in Business Administration, and Juris Doctor degrees from Cornell University, he earned a Master of Laws in Taxation from Georgetown University in 1973. He later served on the Real Estate Tax Problems Committee of the Tax Section of the American Bar Association and has been a consultant to the U.S. Congress. He is a member of the District of Columbia Bar and is on the faculty of Graduate Realtors' Institutes in several states.

Professor Sampson will be remembered as a creative and caring colleague with a remarkable career as a scholar, teacher, and practitioner, and a great sense of humor. Upon his retirement from American University, he was named professor emeritus of taxation.

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Title: Diamonds Are Forever
Author: Gregg Sangillo
Subtitle:
Abstract: Dean Erran Carmel talks about the significance of Kogod’s 60th anniversary.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 04/15/2015
Content:

American University's Kogod School of Business is celebrating its 60th anniversary in 2015. On Friday, April 17, Kogod will hold a birthday party with balloons and cake at the Massachusetts Avenue Terrace. Kogod kicked off this year's festivities with a lecture from Ronnie Mervis, a local radio personality and CEO of Mervis Diamond Importers (in keeping with the 60th "diamond anniversary" theme). For the occasion of the business school's special year, Dean Erran Carmel sat down with University Communications for a wide-ranging discussion about the past, present, and future of Kogod.

UC: As you look back on 60 years, what do you think is Kogod's legacy?

Carmel: "We are the first business school in the district, and we have one of the first international business programs, certainly in the region and in the country as well. We've had one of the strongest real estate programs in our business school."

UC: Can you talk about how the business school got its name?

Carmel: "Bob Kogod has been so much a part of this school. And his story is really very much intertwined with the 60 year history of Kogod. He was one of our early students, graduating in the class of '62. By then, he was already working in the family business that he married into, the Charles E. Smith Company. It was already successful, and it became one of the most successful real estate companies in the United States. It built Crystal City, and so much around Washington. Bob Kogod became very wealthy, very quickly, and he endowed this school in 1979 with a gift. At that point, it was the Kogod College of Business Administration. We changed our name slightly after this. And Bob is still very much involved with the school."

UC: What's your vision for the future of Kogod?

Carmel: "The vision I'm laying out is what we call Business in the Capital. When we started 60 years ago, we were the only business school in town. Now, in the region, there are many physical business schools to compete with us. So we will be distinctive around Business in the Capital. We will be the destination for everybody in the city when they want to find out about business in the greater D.C. area. And they'll come to us, and we will be the address for that. We will generate knowledge about the greater D.C. area, and we will build excellence. In addition to being a big generalist business school, we have everything from accounting to entrepreneurship to technology."

UC: What are some of the popular degree programs here?

Carmel: "International business has always been popular, and that makes sense because our students are quite cosmopolitan. Marketing is quite popular these days, especially as a second degree. Finance and accounting are very strong now. And then we have some of the more boutique, specialized majors that really catch the ears of the students, such as the new 'business and entertainment' major. Now, with the new incubator, entrepreneurship has been given a whole new life."

UC: Can you elaborate on the Sustainable Entrepreneurship and Innovation Initiative and the new incubator?

Carmel: "We teach business. It's a hands-on, experiential learning process. We have to get students out of the classroom and have them touch business. A startup really gets them excited about business and entrepreneurship. And even if they never end up becoming entrepreneurs, they learn so much about business just by going through that."

UC: Have you tried to encourage alumni involvement with this?

Carmel: "The alumni are falling over themselves to try to be involved in this. And we instantly have an advisory board of seasoned people for the entrepreneurship initiative. Many of the board members are serial entrepreneurs."

UC: Would you identify some outstanding academic scholarship that has recently come out of Kogod?

Carmel: "Let me start with some of the research in marketing. Sonya Grier does some very interesting work on gentrification in urban areas. She just did a film, which is wonderful. I like the video because I think it speaks to how professors are making impacts in new ways. Cristel Russell looks at how we consume advertising and information about products. Manoj Hastak works a lot on how advertising and packaging content influences consumers in perhaps the wrong way. On tax matters, Don Williamson has focused on the impact of tax policy on small businesses rather than the usual perspective of looking at large corporations."

UC: Have you been enjoying your time as Kogod dean?

Carmel: "I really love the job. It's very different from the life of a professor. Even though I'm in the same building, it's a completely different day. But it's stimulating and challenging. I'm doing a lot of this because I have been here for 20 years. This is a place that I feel very connected to, and I think that's one of the drivers that helps me move forward."

UC: If you had to generalize, what type of undergraduate student enrolls at Kogod?

Carmel: "Young students who got drawn into business and economics early on, and who want to explore more about these subjects. Most of them don't have very much exposure to business, and so it's really the beginning of their exploration. Some people come from family businesses and they are very much influenced by that."

UC: In addition to students who want to enter the business world, do you find a lot of students interested in social progress?

Carmel: "We have a graduate program in sustainability management. One career path students choose is to be a chief sustainability officer. But it's not just in sustainability. I think the dream of every student who comes into the program is to really make a broad impact. These are people who have a strong social mission to their lives, and these are the kinds of students we attract and want to help."

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Title: Annual Kogod Network Launches New Mentorship Program
Author: Laura Herring
Subtitle:
Abstract: Annual networking event connects students, alumni, to advance careers.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 04/13/2015
Content:

This year's Kogod Network was more than just the biggest networking event of the year: it launched a pilot mentoring program named after school benefactor Robert P. Kogod (RPK).

The RPK Mentors Program, managed by the Kogod Center for Career Development, aims to pair current Kogod students with successful Kogod alumni.

An advocate of strong mentor/mentee relationships himself, Kogod highlighted their importance in his commencement address at the school’s ceremony in 2000.

"[You should] seek out persons of more knowledge and experience who will take an interest in you," he encouraged the graduates. "They will greatly enhance and facilitate your growth."

The pilot program currently has 13 second-year Full-time MBA students partnered with 13 MBA alumni.

Practice, Practice, Practice

In addition to the launch of the RPK Mentors Program, Kogod Network, which took place on April 1, facilitated mock interviews for Kogod students of all levels. More than 80 students participated, gaining experience that will give them an upper hand in future career advances.

"It's an opportunity to receive feedback from a hiring and HR perspective," said Gissela Ticse, MSA '15. "Most companies aren't going to provide feedback after an interview, either you get the job or you don't and you don’t always know why."

The mock interviews also allow students to develop their skills without worrying about failure.

"It's a safe space to practice answering those tough questions," said Caroline Jureller, BSBA '16. "You can always improve your answers and always get more comfortable with yourself, which really shows in an interview. The mock interviews help me with that without asking in the back of my mind 'did I just lose this job?'"

Being confident and comfortable during an interview is key, according to the interviewers.

"Putting yourself out there and relaxing can be one of the toughest parts of an interview," said Brad Sherman, MSF '12 and president of Sherman Wealth Management. "It's important to be more than just the points on a resume, you have to engage with an interviewer and be comfortable in your own skin and that only comes through practice."

Jocelyn Prudencio, BSBA '99 and manager at Cordia Partners, stressed the importance of engagement as well.

"An interview is a two-way street. If you expect the hiring managers to be interested in you, you need to be interested in them and the company. Ask questions, think about your answers, it shows an interest."

To share how you'd like to get involved as a Kogod alumnus, please complete this survey.

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Title: AU Students Excel in Cyber Security Competition
Author: Dan Letovsky
Subtitle:
Abstract: A multidisciplinary team of American University students received the “Best Oral Presentation” award for their cybersecurity policy recommendations at the Atlantic Council’s Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge.
Topic: International
Publication Date: 04/13/2015
Content:

A multidisciplinary team of American University students received the “Best Oral Presentation” award for their cybersecurity policy recommendations at the Atlantic Council’s Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge on March 13 and 14. The School of International Service co-hosted the event with the Washington College of Law.

The team, called the AU Cybernauts, laid out pathways for U.S. policymakers in a written brief that they then presented to a panel of judges representing academia, government, and industry. During an evening reception at the law office of Baker & McKenzie, the team received the award and advanced to the semi-final round of the competition.

The AU Cybernauts are:

Eric Fleddermann, SIS/BA ’13
Dan Letovsky, KSB/MBA ’15
Nicole Shadowen, SIS/MA ’15
Juhi Tariq, WCL and SIS/MA ’15

The students were coached by SIS Hurst Adjunct Professorial Lecturer Eric Novotny and Melanie Teplinsky of WCL. AU has fielded a team every year of the competition, which is in its third year.

The Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge is designed to expose graduate and undergraduate students to the increasing importance of cyberspace in political competition and conflict resolution.

In the simulated crisis environment, students played the roles of intelligence analysts and policy advisors. They were asked to make recommendations to the National Security Council in response to a territorial dispute in the Spratly Islands between the People’s Republic of China and the Philippines. The scenario involved the use of wiper-style malware and DDoS attacks against a U.S. energy company. Additionally, teams grappled with questions of attribution, norms of cyberwarfare, and the roles of government and private sector entities in both regaining control of and protecting critical infrastructure networks.

“I enjoyed learning about the diverse field of cybersecurity,” said team member Juhi Tariq, WCL and SIS/MA ’15. “Our team’s multidisciplinary approach proved essential in understanding the nuances and implications of cybersecurity responses, which range from legal obligations to foreign policy considerations.”

The competition also featured cybersecurity experts in career panels, technology demonstrations, and speeches. Tom Parker, CTO of FusionX, demonstrated a computer network exploitation attack on an industrial SCADA system. General Michael Hayden, former Director of the U.S. National Security Agency and the Central Intelligence Agency, counseled the student attendees to sharpen their communication skills, which he said were crucial in the field of professional cybersecurity.

James Voorhees, MSISM Program Director of the SANS Technology Institute, stressed the uniqueness of the competition.

“There is no competition like it. A successful team must know the issues and actors in cybersecurity, both foreign and domestic,” said Voorhees. “The team must then be able to present recommendations to the judges, orally and in writing, before showing how well they can think on their feet when the judges ask tough questions. It gives the students an experience that is like no other.”

AU students interested in learning about future Cyber 9/12 competitions may contact Professor Eric Novotny at novotny@american.edu
They can also visit the Atlantic Council’s website: http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/resources/2015-cyber-9-12-student-challenge-competition

Pictures from the 2015 conference can be found on the Atlantic Council’s Flickr page: https://www.flickr.com/photos/atlanticcouncil/sets/72157651511095181/

Dan Letovsky is a 2015 MBA candidate in the Kogod School of Business.

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Title: New Student Club Brings the Fashion Industry to Kogod
Author: Sam Kauffmann
Subtitle:
Abstract: Kogod students explore fashion from the business perspective through new club, The American Fashion Society.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 04/09/2015
Content:

Washington, D.C. may not be the first city that comes to mind when you think of fashion, but a new Kogod student club proves the fashion industry in the District is gaining a foothold.

Fashion in the Capital

Phil Tschepik, BLC ’17, and Zuli Burnett, BAE ’17, serve as the President and Vice President of the brand new club, The American Fashion Society, to bring more a business perspective to the fashion industry for Kogod students.

“Management plays an important role in the fashion industry; it’s not all designing,” said Burnett, a New York City native who’s familiar with the industry.

While the Bachelor of Science in Business and Entertainment degree at Kogod doesn’t currently offer fashion and business courses, a great amount of student interest at an informational meeting prompted the founding of the new club in January of this year.

The club currently has about 30 active members, a full board and this semester has operated all events purely on donations.

“We want to start introducing the idea for fashion business classes at Kogod, but we also see ourselves as a place for students who are interested in fashion to really explore,” said Tschepik.

Yellow Ribbon Fund Runway

This Sunday, April 12th, the group will host their inaugural AU student fashion show to raise money for the Yellow Ribbon Fund.

The Yellow Ribbon Fund Runway will feature all student models and clothing from connected DC and NY fashion designers, including:

Denise Fasuyi, Desire by Denise, Saadia Khan, formal wear, Mary Vandiver from Howard University and Ean Williams, Creative Director of Corjor International and Executive Director of DC Fashion Week.

Second District Records, a student-run record label, will provide music and performances.

Tickets are $10 and all proceeds go to directly to the Yellow Ribbon Fund, a DMV based charity that helps injured veterans and their families through housing and transportation, support programs and events that promote the healing process.

The event will take place in MCG 2-5 from 6-9 p.m. For anyone who cannot attend the event, donations to the Yellow Ribbon Fund are encouraged.

The American Fashion Society is open to students from all majors and schools at American University. For more information, check out their Facebook page or contact them at: aufashionclub@gmail.com.

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Title: Kogod Alumna Jumps Into Career in Ski Industry
Author: Sam Kauffmann
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Abstract: Emily Young, BSBA ’14, begins her career in the ski industry, aligning her passion with her profession.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 04/08/2015
Content:

At the top of a ski slope, there are multiple ways to get down the mountain—the hardest part is making the first move.

For Kogod alumna Emily Young, BSBA '14, taking the risk to forge her own path by following her passion for skiing has resulted in a huge payoff.

Strategic Moves

Young grew up loving winter sports and surrounded by the ski industry near Blue Mountain, Pennsylvania. While at Kogod, Young realized she wanted to turn this passion into a career.

Young earned her BSBA degree and a specialization in marketing in a little more than three years, taking her last classes online over the summer so that she could be done in time for the upcoming ski season in 2014.

She moved to Burlington, Vermont—an ideal east coast ski destination nestled among multiple mountain resorts and Lake Champlain. Rather than search for jobs online and apply remotely, she moved to be just a short distance from possible employers, making her job hunt easier.

"For any job related to the travel industry, you need to make the move first," said Young. "The biggest thing to keep in mind is that a job might not be instantaneous with the move."

However for Young, the move was well worth the risk. By October, she was employed in the hospitality department of Sugar Bush Resorts. Her daily work includes lodging revenue management and front desk management for Clay Brook Luxury Hotel.

More Than a Textbook

While at Kogod, Young learned the importance of working with others, thinking critically and being professional in the workplace.

"Kogod classes are more than a text book—you learn to be a good employee, group worker, and networker," she said.

She credits her professors at Kogod for sculpting "professional personalities" that make alumni into standout candidates who are positive and confident with their skill sets.

Young was encouraged to pursue a career in the ski industry, even if it was not necessarily the typical path of a business student.

Finance professor and executive-in-residence Anthony Del Mar told her to "do what you love and love what you do."

"Being true to yourself keeps you energized and on -point as an employee," said Young.

Career into Lifestyle

Young's best advice for finding a career that doubles as a lifestyle: be self-aware and be coachable.

"Make decisions that align with your values as a person and don’t confuse your own values with other's expectations," she said.

For graduates who are ready to make the move and break into a new industry, it is important to keep an open mind and be flexible to job options that you have never considered before. If a company’s culture is a good fit, getting a foot in the door is more than enough.

"Hard skills are teachable, you can't teach being a good employee," she said. "Taking the plunge is not easy, but with the right personality you can be successful doing that."

Young is happy with where she is as a young professional, knowing when you work where you love, every day is a good one.

"A lot of times when I'm driving into work, I feel like I'm on vacation. Everyday is something new, and I don’t see that ever getting boring."

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Title: Kogod to Launch Summer Institute for High School Students
Author: Sam Kauffmann
Subtitle:
Abstract: High school students to peek behind the curtain of the sports and entertainment industries at new summer experience.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 03/16/2015
Content:

Today's teenagers have grown up in a world where media and pop culture are always just one click away.

Access to the sports and entertainment industries is faster now than ever before, thanks to the continued expansion of digital technology and media platforms.

But for every athlete or celebrity in the limelight, there's a team of business people behind them making it all possible. Kogod's new Summer Institute will give high school juniors and seniors a look at the engine driving these growing industries.

Kogod Summer Institute

From August 2-7, the inaugural Kogod Summer Institute (KSI) for rising high school juniors and seniors will provide students with a passion for the fast-paced world of sports and entertainment an inside look at these industries in the nation's capital.

The intensive one-week program will combine classroom experiences with site visits in the fields of sports entrepreneurship and the entertainment business. Students will also work throughout the week in small teams to create a business plan relevant to their track that will be presented at the closing ceremony.

The Tracks

Students will have the option to choose between a focus in Sports Entrepreneurship or Business and Entertainment.

Adjunct Professor Matt Winkler, a sports industry leader with more than 20 years of experience, will lead the Sports Entrepreneurship track.

"What makes the sports industry so interesting is that it's universal...so many people around the world can relate to it or have it in common," said Winkler in regards to the surge in popularity for the sports industry.

"It's been fascinating to see Washington, D.C. become one of the best sports and entrepreneurial markets in the country,” he said. “...it features a diverse set of stadiums, owners, teams, and young stars...permeated by a creative technology and social media culture that can keep up with it all."

Students will have the chance to visit the Under Armour headquarters, as well as FedEx Field, Nationals Park, and ESPN Studios during the week.

John Simson, faculty program director of the BS Business and Entertainment (BAE) degree at Kogod, will direct the business of entertainment track. Simson has been involved in the Washington, D.C. music industry as an entertainment lawyer for more than 30 years and has seen first hand its growth as a vibrant market.

"In the past 30 years, Discover, National Geographic, BET and many other major networks have joined DC," Simson said. "It's important to have a presence here for lobbying purposes and for congress to be aware of artist rights."

Students with the business and entertainment track will visit National Geographic Television and speak with a producer about how shows are chosen to be on air, and learn how SoundExchange collects royalties for artists.

Building a Network Early

Winkler wants students to finish the program with an understanding of the importance of networking.

"Being engaged with a cohort of like-minded [individuals] is often the first step in getting a foothold in the industry," he said. "Despite ubiquitous access to the internet, access to the true enterprises and the people shaping the industry has never been more important."

However, a connection to industry leaders and connected professors is not a replacement for hard work.

"Many make the mistake that because these are attractive industries, they are not hard work," said Simson. "You really have to work hard to break in—start at the bottom and work your way up."

Registration for the Kogod Summer Institute is now open, with early bird pricing in effect until March 31. Contact Abby Moreau at abby@american.edu or 202-885-6693 with any questions.

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Title: Teamwork on the Court and in the Classroom: AU Men's Basketball
Author:
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Abstract: Two thirds of the AU men's basketball team are Kogod students, creating community on and off the court.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 02/26/2015
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Business, much like basketball, is a team effort. Both require teamwork, value strong communication and depend on quick decision-making skills. Whether it’s down to crunch time with seconds left on the clock during a game, or in the classroom, the AU Men's Basketball team is prepared for success.

"Kogod is a lot of teamwork and we're definitely used to that," said senior guard John Schoof, BSBA '15.

As a freshman, Schoof decided he had an interest in business and many of his teammates were also in Kogod. He ended up loving the classes and sticking with it, specializing in finance.

"When I was an underclassman my teammates would always help me out with what classes to take, what the specializations were all about, and I’ve tried to do that with the younger guys," he said. "I'll preach all good things about Kogod to the underclassman on my team."

Two-thirds of the AU men's basketball team are students in the Kogod School of Business, bridging the gap of teamwork on the court, to teamwork on the road and in the classroom.

Jesse Reed, BSBA '16, and 2014 Scholar Athlete of the Year, also sees the similarities between his teammates and classmates on and off the court.

"An athlete and a businessman are similar. It requires a lot of teamwork and a lot of networking—qualities of hard work and perseverance go on the court too."

Sophomore guard Charlie Jones, BAE '17, has found this support from his teammates in the same classes to be extremely helpful, especially when the team travels during the season.

"Sometimes we share notes and tips in classes, especially when we miss class. We help each other out to make sure we are on track and not falling behind," he said.

The business of entertainment is an area of interest for Jones, which makes delegating enough time to study and get it all done not a huge sacrifice.

Although the balance of full time student and full time athlete is no easy feat, Reed credits the support of Kogod professors who are willing to work with him and his teammates and always understand when they need an extension or to reschedule an exam.

"It's tough but rewarding being in Kogod and on the basketball team," said Reed.

A Community Behind Them

For the players, having the support of Kogod is a source of encouragement for them.

At This Saturday’s home game against Bucknell, the school is sponsoring an Inaugural Kogod Appreciation Day in celebration of the upcoming 60th anniversary for the Kogod School of Business.

"I love the idea of the Kogod community game. There's nothing better than a packed game, it gives fuel to the fire. Especially coming from the Kogod community," said Reed.

"I think it's awesome, because we have so many guys on our team in Kogod and they help us out a lot. They are both understanding and supportive of us even after the semester they remember me, follow the team and ask how the season's going," Schoof said.

The game is also Senior Day, honoring the four seniors on the team—Pee Wee Gardner, BSPH, Kyle Kager, BSBA, Kevin Panzer, BSPH, and John Schoof, BSBA.

Join the Kogod community this Saturday, February 28th at 12p.m. in support of the reigning Men's Basketball Patriot League Champions as they take on Bucknell at the last home game of the regular season.

Admission to the game is FREE for all current Kogod students with a valid AU ID.

Tickets exclusively for Kogod faculty, staff, alumni and family members of current students are available at the discounted price of $7.50 for end zone seating and $15.00 for premium sideline.  

Buy tickets online at AUeagles.com/Tickets and use code Kogod15.

After the game join us for a casual reception with light snacks in Kogod. RSVP required by clicking here.

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newsId: D56DA56A-5056-AF26-BE4EDBCB72D14468
Title: Alumni Admissions Volunteer Chair Shares Passion for AU
Author: Patricia Rabb
Subtitle:
Abstract: Maria Luisa Ortega shares her passion for recruiting prospective students for AU.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 04/07/2015
Content:

"Growing up in Puerto Rico, and being the daughter of Cuban exiles, I decided to attend AU because it was by far the most international school I had visited," says Maria Luisa Ortega, Kogod/BSBA '85. "Coming from a family where politics and culture were always part of our daily conversation, Washington, DC represented the perfect environment for me." 

After her first visit during her junior year in high school, Maria Luisa knew she wanted to attend college at AU. "I had studied French and Russian growing up, and I was desperate to practice it and mingle with students from different countries," she says.

Maria Luisa enjoys reminiscing about her time at AU in the 1980s. "AU's teachers were the nicest, most helpful and caring. I remember hearing horror stories from friends at other schools, and I felt so proud that my teachers were always there for me," she recalls. With the Reagan administration in office during her time at AU, she has fond memories of that era. "Studying in DC during the Reagan years was absolutely thrilling to me. The United States was at the top of its game, and I was at AU enjoying all that glory," she proclaims.   

During her junior year at AU, Maria Luisa secured an internship at an advertising and marketing firm in Georgetown. That internship turned into a part-time job during her senior year. While completing her degree at the Kogod School of Business, Maria Luisa also studied French, Russian, and Italian. She believes this combination helped her obtain the job she wanted as an account executive in a Miami advertising agency upon graduation. 

With her daughter, Claudia Iturregui, CAS/BA '16, a current student at AU, Maria Luisa is delighted to share a legacy tie. "The pride that I feel having my daughter at AU cannot be measured. To know that Claudia is having experiences very similar to the ones I had is something for which I have no words," she exclaims. Maria Luisa believes her experiences at AU in the 1980s aren't that different from her daughter's experiences today. "It's as international and political as always, and she tells me the teachers are as nice as ever," she says. 

Maria Luisa resides in Coral Gables, Florida with her son, Enrique Iturregui, a high school senior. She owns and manages a franchise called Mr. Pretzels with stores in Florida and Georgia. "I love this kind of business because it deals with everything I studied at Kogod: accounting, finance, advertising, and manufacturing," she says.

As a long-time AU Alumni Admissions Volunteer (AAV) and chair of the AAV network, volunteering her time to AU has been very satisfying for Maria Luisa. The AAV network includes alumni and parents who assist admissions in the recruitment of prospective students. It is the largest group of AU alumni volunteers with more than 600 members in 38 states and 14 countries. "To be able to help AU recruit students who show great intellect, who are passionate, and who want to leave a mark in this world, what is better than that," she exclaims. 

Reflecting on her role as AAV network chair, Maria Luisa says she wants to attract more alumni to share their pride and love for AU with prospective students. "It is time for us to give back to the school that helped us grow, that trained and prepared us for what was to come and that ultimately pushed us out into the world as success stories waiting to happen," she declares.

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Title: Social Innovation with a Global Focus: How Tighe Wall makes an impact
Author: Nina Cooperman, SPA/MPA '15
Subtitle:
Abstract: Tighe Wall, Kogod/MBA ’11 shares his thoughts on his time at AU and how his experience at Kogod helped him find a career with a truly global reach in social and digital strategy.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 11/05/2014
Content:

As an editor and writer for the Princeton Review, Tighe Wall, Kogod/MBA '11, edited the guidebook to the 191 Best Business schools. When it came time to select a graduate program for himself, American University's Kogod School of Business was at the top of his list. Now, as a managing consultant in the social business global center of competence at IBM global business services in London, Tighe credits AU's global perspective to his success. Coming to AU, he says, gave him the opportunity to "build a small international business base in the U.S. and gain entrepreneurial skills."

During his time at Kogod, Tighe worked as an innovation and entrepreneurship research assistant with Professor Stevan Holmberg and interned with IBM. He says his experience "supplemented what I was learning with real world experience. AU has a real campus and all of the other attributes of living in the city are at your fingertips." 

Tighe continued to excel at Kogod and, as the commencement speaker for the business school's graduate students, urged his classmates to "keep taking chances and embrace new experiences."

His work caught the attention of the social business group, a small global group consisting of experts in the field within IBM who shape the company's point of view on the application of social networking tools and culture to business roles, processes and outcomes. He now works in London and has a portfolio of clients all over Europe.

Though he's moved to London, Tighe stays connected to the university. He is a member of the Alumni Board and serves as an alumni admissions volunteer. He sees these opportunities as ways to give back to the university, and as someone who went to AU for graduate school at Kogod, he brings a unique voice to the group.

According to Tighe, "Going through Kogod changed the way I think of the larger business community and global business. It broadened my perspective and fundamentally changed the way I understand how the business world works –the curriculum and the professors and thinking of business functions as a piece of how a larger organization operates." That global perspective has paid off.

Tags: Admissions,Alumni,Alumni Board,Entrepreneurship,Kogod School of Business
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Title: Luchs Family Scholarship Recipient Molly Fallon Reaps Rewards of Hard Work, Giving Back
Author: Mike Rowan
Subtitle:
Abstract: Her appreciation for debate aside, Molly Fallon can agree with her scholarship donor on one of their core values—the importance of giving back and paying it forward.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 05/29/2014
Content:

As commencement festivities took over campus and fellow classmates fondly reminisced about the best times of their college years, Molly Fallon, Kogod/BSBA ’14, recalled a different kind of memory—arguing.

Not just any kind of arguing, however. “I’ve really appreciated the disagreement and the debate that some of these classes have spurred from us,” said Fallon. “We’ve begun to disagree with one another in very constructive ways and bring some of our convictions forward.”

A Des Moines, Iowa native concentrating in marketing and finance, Fallon was chosen as the undergraduate speaker for the Kogod School of Business 2014 commencement. “Ironically, my fondest learning moments are not about agreement,” she shared with the Bender Arena crowd of faculty, family, and her fellow graduates. “While we might seek comfort in group settings, what we actually need is discomfort.”

For all her talk of discord and dissent, Fallon proved herself a natural collaborator in her time at AU. As a peer consultant in the Kogod Center for Business Communication, she assisted Kogod students with business writing and presentation skills. She also served as treasurer for the sorority Chi Omega, and worked together with about 30 students to oversee a portfolio of $350,000 in AU’s Student Managed Investment Fund. On top of that, she earned one of the school’s most prestigious group accomplishments—her team took home first place in the 2014 Annual Kogod Case Competition.

Recalling the case competition, she admitted, “That should have been one of the most stressful weeks of my life but it really was one of the most fun, honestly. It was a really great moment to leverage everything I had learned in the past four years here and have fun with it.”

Fallon’s leadership skills and community-oriented spirit were rewarded when she was named a recipient of the Luchs Family Scholarship for the 2013-2014 academic year. The application process for the scholarship asks students to provide evidence of deep involvement in the Kogod community. Humble, but attuned to the scholarship’s meaning, she reflected, “I think that my history of giving back to fellow students while at Kogod was something that identified me as a strong candidate.”

“I didn’t stand out in terms of numbers,” she shared. “To know that I was recognized for doing hard work, and that hard work wasn’t going unnoticed, [the fact that] it could be rewarded, and I could help myself through college by doing good work was a lot of positive reinforcement for me.”

A couple of days before giving her commencement address, Fallon had the opportunity to meet one of the benefactors of her scholarship, Kenneth J. Luchs, over lunch. The two found that they shared a passion for giving back.

“You can contribute in different ways,” Luchs said. “Money is only one way. Time is another way. Be a mentor to somebody.”

A strong history of civic engagement runs through Kenneth Luchs’ family. From the time his grandfather founded the family’s real estate business, Shannon & Luchs, in 1906, the family has been active in the growth of Washington, taking on leadership roles in various community organizations—a tradition that Luchs himself has carried on. A one-time American University student—taking night classes in real estate while he helped to run the family business by day—Luchs went on to serve on the AU Board of Trustees for 12 years. His afternoon with the recipients of his family’s scholarship marked 50 years—nearly to the day—since his father first introduced him to AU.

“I’d like [the recipients] to know that I’m available to be a mentor, and that I want them to be available as mentors to future students,” said Luchs. “It’s our duty to pay back whatever schools we’ve been educated at.”

Said Fallon after meeting Luchs, “He further instilled in me the belief that we can all do something to give back to those who have profoundly impacted our lives.”

Even as she found inspiration from getting to know her scholarship donor, Fallon had already been taking Luchs’ message to heart. While treasurer of Chi Omega, Fallon brought more scholarships to her sisters, stepping up efforts to identify and publicize existing opportunities, and creating new need-based awards by making minor budgeting adjustments. She has also taken it upon herself to be an advocate, often urging her sisters and students she advises as a peer consultant to apply for certain scholarships. She notes that students don’t realize what great candidates they are, and all they need is to know that the opportunities exist.

“I think that’s something really important—the idea of students helping students find and seek out scholarship opportunities,” said Fallon. “I am glad to have left that legacy.”






 

Tags: Center for Business Communications,Commencement,Giving,Kogod School of Business,Scholarship
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newsId: 03DCA440-F399-8A8D-CB557FB2BB853C68
Title: Business & Public Affairs: A Perfect Marriage
Author: Phil Recchio
Subtitle:
Abstract: Ben, Kogod/MBA ’11, and Christina Macfarland, SPA/MPA ’11, entrepreneurially apply their skills in South Florida, while giving back to AU.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 05/15/2014
Content:

Ben, Kogod/MBA ’11, and Christina Macfarland, SPA/MPA ’11, came to AU together, shortly after getting married in their native state of Florida, to pursue their individual academic and professional interests. Christina’s passion for nonprofit work and supporting her community led her to pursue a Master of Public Administration and,a graduate certificate in nonprofit management, whereas Ben built off his undergrad business degree by focusing his MBA studies on real estate and finance. Since graduation, they have returned to their home state to not only put their degrees to work, but also spread word of AU’s excellence while galvanizing the Florida alumni community. 

This past February, Christina and Ben hosted more than 60 AU alumni, parents, and friends in their Palm Beach home, and had the chance to catch up with their old neighbor, Vice President of Alumni Relations and Development, Dr. Thomas J. Minar. Before Dr. Minar delivered updates regarding campus plans and alumni initiatives within the South Florida community, Christina reminisced about her time working in the AU development department for corporate and foundation giving, and Ben remembered hunkering down in their condo during the infamous Snow-maggedon storm of 2010. 

These types of close relationships serve as a beautiful model for how the Office of Alumni Relations and Development seeks to engage AU alumni, and Christina and Ben are no strangers to the world of philanthropy and volunteering. Christina is a board member for the Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties, where fellow master’s alumna Jillian Vukusich, CAS/MA ’04, serves as vice president for community investment.  

Christina continues her educational pursuits, and is a recent graduate of "Leadership Palm Beach County," which kept her up to date on the latest trends in philanthropic and non profit leadership. This is especially important for those as involved in their communities as she is. She volunteers and has served on numerous committees for The Flagler Museum, March of Dimes, Historical Society of Palm Beach County, the Ryan Licht Sang Bipolar Foundation, and the Association of Fundraising Professionals. Presently, Christina performs research and writing for Women Corporate Directors, the only global membership organization of women corporate directors which serves as a catalyst for thought leadership and networking.

In addition to serving on his high school’s alumni board and helping to recruit great students to AU, Ben founded a local publication, Palm Beach Philanthropy, to showcase and educate the public to the diverse causes being supported right in their backyard. While philanthropy has always been a passion and a practice for the Macfarlands, Ben also puts his MBA to work running a boutique asset management firm that focuses on investing family office and institutional capital into self storage, student housing, and other special situations in real estate. The firm, where Ben serves as a partner and chief investment officer, has successfully acquired over two million square feet of real estate in the last two years.

The Macfarlands' collective energy and productivity is even more impressive in light of the fact they’ve accomplished so much all while raising their blossoming family. While their two young girls are a handful at home, Ben and Christina have a long standing history of supporting each other through thick and thin. While on campus, they could be seen attending a kick-off event to help rally support for Christina’s successful run for Editor-in-Chief of the SPA journal The Public Purpose, and nowadays they work to balance their busy schedules of business and board meetings with family meals and outings. 

Thankfully, the Macfarlands have continued their tradition of support as alumni by hosting the recent event for the South Florida AU Eagle community. As for the beautiful marriage of Ben’s business degree and Christina’s nonprofit policy focus, its power can be encapsulated by an Arthur Fried quote: “Private philanthropy is the last frontier of unconstrained freedom for private action in the public good.” AU is lucky to count this entrepreneurial and philanthropically minded young couple among its alumni family.

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newsId: 3831F1B2-EEBA-1613-3AF966FAECEFF341
Title: Building Upon a Family History
Author: Mike Rowan
Subtitle:
Abstract: After her valuable AU experience—and now her daughter’s—Mary McCarthy Hayford and her family are helping lay the groundwork for the university’s next generation.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 03/27/2014
Content:

Stroll along the west side of the quad, passing Frisbees floating across the grass and cheerful student organizations camped outside of Mary Graydon, and at either end of campus you will find a building that has been transformed within the last five years. Across the street from the Katzen Arts Center, the Kogod School of Business opened a 20,000-square-foot expansion in 2008. A few hundred yards down, next to Bender Library, stands the newly reopened McKinley building, the state-of-the-art new home of the School of Communication. Though housing separate schools, and situated on opposite ends of campus, there’s a strong thread connecting the two of them—the Hayford family.

Mary McCarthy Hayford, Kogod/MBA ’78, did her graduate work at AU’s business school, but when she attended, it did not yet bear the Kogod name. It was simply called the School of Business Administration. Classes were housed in the Ward Circle Building, and offices were in the cozy quarters of the Hamilton Building (known then as Hamilton Hall).

“I remember picking AU based on my perception that the administrators and faculty were more accessible,” McCarthy Hayford shares as she recalls her AU experience. “I look back not only on the great full-time professors in subjects which appeal to me, but also on several adjunct professors who imparted real world experiences. For me, that exposure to professionals working in industry was essential to seeing how the theoretical was applied in the real world, and to envisioning the type of career I would want to pursue.”

When the Kogod School of Business announced plans for its expansion campaign, Mary and her husband, Warren, signed on to help by making a major contribution to the building. Their generosity is marked by a plaque adorning one of the new classrooms inside, which displays their names.

Then, three years later, when the effort to renovate McKinley began, the Hayfords were there again, eager to give back once more, naming the facility’s new audio editing suite.

Why jump in to support another major project, especially when the family had so significantly dedicated themselves to an effort close to their hearts just a few years earlier? One reason is that their daughter, Margaret, SOC/BA ’13, just finished a very positive undergraduate career in the School of Communication.

“We feel strongly that SOC and AU provided Margaret with the experience she needs to pursue her career goals,” McCarthy Hayford articulates. “AU was one of few schools where she could study film and graphic design while still broadening her education in history, science and social science. She capped off her SOC experience with a semester in the film school in Prague where she worked with a small group to create a professional-quality film.”

In addition to Margaret, the Hayfords are parents to Amanda, a 2006 alumna of Oberlin College, and Warren, who graduated from George Washington University in 2012. Ms. McCarthy Hayford’s husband, Warren John Hayford, is the president and managing director of the software company RatioServices, and is a director of the Warren J. and Marylou Hayford Family Foundation, which his parents founded. The foundation has been instrumental in the Hayfords’ gifts to American University.

Though she has graduated—as have her children—McCarthy Hayford remains an avid learner. While embarking on a path toward starting a new career, she has been steadily auditing courses at the university. “Wherever that takes me, I hope to keep close ties to AU.”

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newsId: 251FAAB1-B60F-C90F-1B47B04B11252ED3
Title: Legal Eagle Utilizes AU Education to Establish Domestic and International Niche
Author: Milt Jackson
Subtitle:
Abstract: AU alumnus’ expertise in law impacts domestic and international cases.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 03/15/2013
Content:

Philadelphia attorney and Kogod class of ’71 alumnus Theodore “Ted” Simon is having a wonderful career. Among other achievements, he has obtained reversals in the Pennsylvania and United States Supreme Courts. In addition to his longstanding successful representation of individuals and corporations locally, nationally, and internationally in state and federal trial and appellate matters (“white collar,” “blue collar” and “no collar”) he is a recognized authority on the subject of international extradition requests, and he has provided advice and counsel to multiple Americans abroad who have found themselves in challenging legal straits.

Accordingly, while accomplishing these achievements and elevating his law practice into a respected national and international niche – he also has become a “go-to guy” for advice and adept handling of high profile media driven cases - where he credits his AU experiences for assisting him to consistently achieve and maintain success.

After graduating from AU, and later, Temple University Law School, Ted joined the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and began to exercise his passion for litigation and criminal law. His drive, focus, creativity, and comprehensive approach eventually earned him a listing as one of Philadelphia Magazine’s “Best Lawyers in Philadelphia;” a selection as a “Pennsylvania Super Lawyer,” and an invited membership in the National Trial Lawyers Organization (a group composed of the top 100 trial lawyers from each state).

Additionally in 2012, he was sworn in as first vice president of the NACDL, a position he relishes because it allows him to play a more specific part in ensuring justice and due process and at the same time recognizing the important and noble work of criminal defense lawyers around the country.

Communicating his passion for justice and due process is another of Ted’s many talents. His most recent appearance, as a guest on CNN and Soledad O’Brien’s “Starting Point” is a case in point. On the show, Ted presented an articulate and seasoned perspective on the complex legal considerations surrounding bail for Paralympic sprinter Oscar Pistorius – who is currently accused of murder in South Africa.

He told O'Brien that Pistorius was a good candidate for bail. He is called upon as a legal expert by honing his speaking as a sought-after speaker for legal seminars across the nation and his numerous on-camera appearances on all major networks and shows including NBC’s The Today Show, ABC’s Good Morning America, CBS’s The Early Show, Larry King Live, Oprah Winfrey Show, ABC’s 20/20, and NBC’s Dateline.

As a result of his recognized communications skills and legal ability, Ted’s client list has included Michael Fay (Singapore caning), Amanda Knox (college student acquitted of murder in Italy), boxing promoter Don King, Gregory Porter (college student accused but all charges dismissed in 2011 protest in Egypt), Chipper Jones (civil defense), New York real estate heir Robert Durst (favorable resolution of federal firearms offenses in Pennsylvania after acquittal in Texas murder and dismemberment case), NBA forward Dante Cunningham (dismissal of alleged drug and other criminal offenses), Drexel’s starting guard Derrick Thomas (dismissal of assault charges) as well as other clients involved in high-profile legal matters.

Ted credits AU for helping to provide a solid academic foundation for his success. He says, “I was just 16, leaving home for the first-time, and the American University environment, the teachers and classmates, soon to be life-long friends could not be more warm, welcoming and supportive. In hindsight it provided the absolute perfect opportunity to grow, excel academically, and provide a rich and enduring network of beloved friends that began the first day and happily remains so today.”

When asked about how he feels about the practice of law after nearly 40 years, he answered, “I feel the same, but more so - it is a gift to be a lawyer, providing care, assistance, and representation in some of the worst of times, whether a person is criminally facing loss of liberty or civilly and entitled to redress and compensation.”

In response to Ted’s appreciation of American University and for all the university has done for him, Ted recently offered his network, time, and support in assisting with planning of an alumni engagement event in downtown Philadelphia. The event was a resounding success due to the participation of Ted and other alumni.

While the law is clearly his personal and professional passion, Ted's continued relationship with his AU Zeta Beta Tau brothers is primarily a personal passion. He says “primarily” because privilege and privacy protects their confidentiality as even here he has been called upon professionally in “life-altering situations.” Ted couldn’t have been happier “to have their back when they needed it most.”

His relationship with the “ZBT Powerhouse of Excellence” brotherhood began when he attended AU and has only strengthened since then. Ted is everlastingly thankful and appreciative of his classmates who have remained truly supportive of his work, accomplishments, and resulting national and international presence in the law.

So the next time you hear the words, “legal expert” mentioned during a news broadcast, pay close attention. It may be that an AU alumnus, by the name of Ted Simon, is about to hold court.

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Title: Real-Life Experiences of AU Alumnus Hits the Big Screen in Blockbuster Hit Argo
Author: Stephanie Block
Subtitle:
Abstract: American University alumnus Mark Lijek, Kogod/MBA ’76, has lived quite the adventure—one big enough to create Hollywood Oscar buzz.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 12/12/2012
Content:

American University alumnus Mark Lijek, Kogod/MBA ’76, has lived quite the adventure—one big enough to create Hollywood Oscar buzz. Lijek was one of six employees lucky enough to escape the protests and attacks on the U.S. Embassy in Iran more than 30 years ago. Their story is the premise of the blockbuster movie Argo.

Lijek arrived in Iran in July 1979 and was only there a few short months before he nearly missed becoming a hostage. With his wife, Cora, by his side along with five others, the group became known as the “houseguests” of the Canadian Embassy for about 10 weeks before leaving the country posing as a film crew and making it back to safely to the U.S.

It was not fear as much as boredom that got the best of Lijek. “Boredom was one of the hardest things to face,” Lijek says. The group played scrabble, and he read many books, writing each title down as he completed it to help record the passing of time.

A recent story published on MyNorthWest.com chronicled details regarding the sequence of events leading to Lijek and the other officers escaping the embassy. Interviews with Lijek and other houseguests will be a special feature of the DVD release of Argo next year. However, as with any film, there is only so much time to share the story. “The movie is a slice of the real story which was why I wrote the book The Houseguests: A Memoir of Canadian Courage and CIA Sorcery,” Lijek says.

Lijek completed a Master in Business Administration at AU, attending class part-time in the evenings while he served in the United States Army during the day. “As an administrative officer for the State Department, I used my graduate degree a fair amount. It prepared me quite a bit,” he says.

Lijek moved to Washington, D.C. from Seattle to complete his undergraduate degree at Georgetown University. He retired from the Foreign Service to spend more time with his wife and children. He lives just outside of Seattle and keeps busy by promoting his new book and managing his website, marklijek.com.   

Tags: Alumni,Alumni Relations,Alumni Relations (KSB),Alumni Update,Kogod School of Business
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Title: Alumni Offer an Unconventional Introduction to Shanghai
Author: Melissa Bevins '02
Subtitle:
Abstract: Jamie Barys and Kyle Long met while studying abroad and have turned their passion into a business.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 11/15/2012
Content:

When Jamie Barys, SOC/BA ’07, and Kyle Long, Kogod/BSBA ’07, studied abroad together in Beijing during their junior year, they left knowing that they wanted to return to China. 

Upon graduation, Kyle moved to Shanghai to teach. Jamie had a corporate job in Washington, D.C. for a while before deciding that it wasn’t for her and moving to Xiamen, China to work as a food writer. The two reconnected and decided to start a business together in Shanghai. 

Both recalled hearing the age-old advice that success comes with doing something about which you are passionate and decided that they wanted to love what they do. Jamie loves to eat. Kyle loves to run and eat. Both love finding off-the-beaten-path places and sharing their findings with friends and family. 

These shared passions led them to start UnTour Shanghai, an urban adventure tourism company specializing in unique and personal day tours, including jogging sightseeing tours, culinary tours, and cultural excursions. Jamie serves as the Chief Eating Officer while Kyle serves as the Chief Running Officer.

Jamie recalls that her first dinner in Beijing was a bad experience. She didn’t speak the language and couldn’t order, and the person who was ordering for her party decided to play a practical joke on the group. She wants to help others avoid that experience and to take the guesswork out of eating well in Shanghai.

“I know how intimidating it can be,” says Jamie, of traveling to a new city and trying to partake in the local foods without speaking the language. To avoid this and help tourists get off on the right foot, UnTour Shanghai provides all its customers with a welcome package that includes restaurant and dish recommendations in the neighborhood.

UnTour Shanghai offers a schedule of weekly public tours as well as several options for private group tours. All tours have a limited number of spaces, as Jamie and Kyle aim to keep them intimate and personalized. 

December 1 will mark the two year anniversary of UnTour Shanghai. Both Jamie and Kyle are excited to celebrate the milestone and look forward to what the future holds for the company they’re growing together.

Tags: Alumni,Alumni Newsletter,Alumni Relations,Alumni Update,China,School of Communication,Kogod School of Business
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newsId: FCCF0BA4-9C30-768D-72A99287EACBDA45
Title: Young Alum Builds on Valuable Relationships
Author: Rebecca Youngerman, SPA/BA '00, SPA/MPA '12
Subtitle:
Abstract: Rich Golaszewski, Kogod/BSBA ’07, has aspired to achieve since he first came to American University.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 10/10/2012
Content:

Rich Golaszewski, Kogod/BSBA ’07, has aspired to achieve since he first came to American University in 2003 as a freshman from Philadelphia.

He used that drive to launch a professional career in financial services. Golaszewski works in New York as a vice president at Nomura Securities International—a leading global investment bank—in Equity Derivatives sales and trading.
 
“The encouragement to go above and beyond has been especially valuable,” he said. “At Kogod, I learned the art of networking and the value of relationships, which has proved extremely beneficial in my career.“

On October 20, Golaszewski will receive the Rising Star Award, which recognizes young alumni who are already making significant contributions to greater society through professional or philanthropic work.

“I am deeply honored to receive this award; it truly means a lot…I continue to try to spend my free time on things that I really care about, and Kogod is at the top of the list,” Golaszewski says.

Golaszewski found his niche on campus through academics and a range of student leadership activities. Participation in the Student Managed Investment Fund (then the Kogod Finance Group) was particularly impactful. Gaining valuable skills in investment management and the stock market aided in building industry knowledge, and the leadership roles built softer traits such as public speaking and organization.

For Golaszewski, peers were mentors. He says, “The outgoing student body always had you thinking how you could do more to better your chances at landing the job you wanted, and this really resonated in me and motivated me to explore different industries through internships and challenging coursework.”

Golaszewski has found meaningful and lasting ways to give back to the university. Last fall, he helped conceptualize and launch the New York Finance Network, a new affinity group open to American University graduates working in the finance and real estate industries.

Golaszewski regularly connects with current students, offering guidance and advice about making the most of their time on campus and beyond.

He also has demonstrated his leadership through financial support of the school, and is encouraging others to do the same by serving as a signatory on the recent solicitation for the Kogod Dean’s Fund that was sent to nearly 1,500 fellow supporters.

Golaszewski’s Kogod relationships are very personal. He is the proud older brother of Jesse Golaszewski, Kogod/BSBA ’12, and is newly engaged to a fellow alum, Shannon Westfall, Kogod/BSBA ’07.

Tags: Alumni,Alumni Board,Alumni Newsletter,Alumni Relations,Alumni Relations (KSB),Alumni Update,Alumni Weekend,Kogod School of Business,Kogod Undergraduate Finance Group
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newsId: AB5D752C-0AD1-15AF-4BE8655BC583A04D
Title: Travis Lay: From AU Basketball Star to Alumni Board Member
Author: Rebecca Vander Linde
Subtitle:
Abstract: Once a leader on the basketball court, Travis Lay continues to lead AU as a member of the Alumni Board.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 08/10/2012
Content:

Most alumni remember Travis Lay, Kogod/BSBA ’08, as the men’s basketball captain who led the Eagles to the prestigious NCAA tournament for the first time in 2008, but Lay is incredibly accomplished both on and off the court. He graduated Magna Cum Laude from American University and continues to give back to his alma mater as a member of the Alumni Board. Lay also embodies the AU spirit of service by donating his time to Year Up, a local charity that provides mentorship to disadvantaged young adults.


Unsurprisingly, basketball was a major factor in Lay’s decision to attend AU. “I grew up in Maryland, right outside D.C., so [by attending AU], my family would be able to see me play. I also knew AU had a strong chance of going to the NCAA tournament. … The combination of that and AU’s strong academics and business school was exactly what I was looking for.”

Lay says the support of the AU community helped boost the team to the NCAA tournament in 2008. “It was encouraging to see the university really get behind us as we succeeded in my senior year. … People were proud of the AU basketball team. It was a unique experience – to walk around campus and have so many people recognize me. And it was great to raise the profile of American University to a national level,” he adds.

After graduation, he moved overseas and played basketball professionally, with stints in England and Australia. Lay elaborates, “I never had the opportunity to study abroad, as many AU students do, so that was a great experience for me to live abroad and play ball before settling down in my real career [in finance].”

Currently, Lay works for SC&H Group, where he helps businesses implement financial software tools. He is pursuing his certification in public accounting and credits AU and his externships as a student with Beers & Cutler and Deloitte for preparing him for the world of finance. He also was very close with the late Kogod Professor Sue Marcum.

In his spare time, Lay is a member of the Alumni Board where he represents the young alumni point of view. He also mentors inner-city young adults through Year Up, a charity that helps minority adults, aged 18 to 24, transition from high school to either higher education or a professional career. Lay says that while growing up, he often played sports with teammates from similar backgrounds as the young adults he mentors, so he can relate to them. He even shot hoops with one of his mentees: “I was in my business clothes at the time, but I told [the other players], ‘Just so you know, I’m not awful at basketball.’”

That’s certainly an understatement, but is typical of Lay. He is modest about his accomplishments, crediting God and luck for his accomplishments and skills on the court and insisting that the Eagles’ victorious 2008 season, culminating in the NCAA tournament, was a team effort – the product of four years of hard work and practice together. In fact, the moments spent with his teammates are his favorite memories of AU.

Tags: Alumni,Alumni Newsletter,Alumni Relations,Alumni Relations (KSB),Alumni Update,Kogod School of Business,Athletics
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