Inspiring Success

woman shaking student's hand

The Kogod Center for Career Development (KCCD) helps students build the path from passion to success. Through personalized strategy and one-on-one mentorship, the Center empowers students to pursue careers that create meaningful change.

Click on each program link below to view our benchmarks for success.

Geneva Oppong

Genever Oppong

BSA, Class of 2018
Minoring in Finance
Internship: Goldman Sachs

"I wanted to speak for people whose struggles weren't [acknowledged]."

Genever's Story

Statistics

93 percent 2016 undergraduates reported a positive outcome (they accepted a new position, started a company or chose to continue their education)

Kogod Survey of 2016 graduates

94 percent 2016 MBA graduates reported a positive outcome (they accepted a new position, started a new company or chose to continue their education)

Kogod Survey of 2016 MBA graduates

90 percent 2016 graduates who completed at least one internship

Kogod Survey of 2016 graduates

 Meet the Students

I wanted to speak for people whose struggles weren't [acknowledged].

Oppong, the daughter of Ghanaian immigrants, grew up in a high-crime area in Newark, New Jersey. She witnessed the challenges of poverty matched with a broken education system—an experience that ultimately informed her passion for business.

Oppong realized becoming a business professional could help her invoke change. Through business, she could develop the tools needed to foster a strong community voice. It was a pathway towards meaningful impact.

In 2014, Oppong enrolled at Kogod and her journey began.

We needed to look at issues on a global and interconnected level.

Valentina Bruno is not one to accept the status quo. She believes in pushing things forward—especially with her research.

This is what drove Bruno, Finance Professor at the Kogod School of Business, to completely re-hash the model used to understand the banking sector. She knew it needed to be re-structured after the late 2000’s financial crisis, she says, and was ready to “explore this world.” “Scholars were making assumptions that weren’t realistic for financial institutions,” she says.