newsId: 8B84C005-EB25-EF7D-A721AD08E0A6375B
Title: Minors at the Border: Three Questions for Professor Daniel Esser
Author:
Subtitle:
Abstract: Assistant Professor Daniel Esser, an expert on aid effectiveness who has conducted field research in Mexico, explains the root causes of the influx and suggests ways to slow the flow of people to the United States.
Topic: International
Publication Date: 07/22/2014
Content:

Thousands of Central American children have arrived at the U.S.-Mexico border in recent months, creating a humanitarian, judicial, and political crisis, as the Obama administration struggles to manage the situation. Assistant Professor Daniel Esser, an expert on aid effectiveness who has conducted field research in Mexico, explains the root causes of the influx and suggests ways to slow the flow of people to the United States.

Q: Why are so many unaccompanied minors trying to cross into the United States?

A: There are both push and pull factors at work. Living conditions for these minors in countries such as Honduras and Guatemala are generally atrocious. Gangs control entire neighborhoods and districts and exert control using extortion, kidnapping, forced gang recruitment, and aggravated sexual violence. The murder rates in cities like San Pedro Sula are a multiple of those in the most violent cities in the United States. Without protection by immediate family members, these children have no reason to stay put. 

At the same time, many of these minors are longing to be reunited with their parents, who may be in the United States. The latter are aware of the dangers facing their children during migration. They often even plead with their children not to embark on the trek, but in light of escalating violence in Central America, these minors have little choice. At the same time, these young people also act on false hopes fueled by rumors that if only they manage to cross into the United States, they might eventually be allowed to stay.

Q: What is happening in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala that is causing so many young people to flee?

A: Two of the most violent gangs in the region originated in the United States, especially in California but also here in the DC area. After deportation, many of their members set up shop in Central America where most national governments have much lower enforcement capacities. Resulting criminal activities and accompanying violence have threatened community cohesion to a point where escape is a form of individual resilience—in a sense, the last option available. While wealthier citizens in these countries wall themselves in and are protected by an army of private security guards, children and adolescents living in these countries have been witnessing the complete breakdown of the state, both locally and nationally, when it comes to basic public service delivery. 

In addition, their exodus adds a new dimension to the billion-dollar business of human trafficking. Considering that each of the more than 50,000 juvenile migrants who, between October 2013 and June of this year, made it to the U.S. border with Mexico where they were apprehended, had paid between US$3,000 and $10,000 to their smugglers, we can imagine the perverse incentives that fuel this kind of migration.

Q: President Obama has asked Congress for emergency funding to deal with the current influx. What steps should be taken in the short, medium, and long term to resolve the situation?

A: The options range, at one extreme, from stricter border controls, expedited removal, and providing financial as well as in-kind assistance to the Mexican government so the latter can improve policing at its southern borders, to—at the other end of the spectrum—a system of emergency shelters that do not lock these minors away for eventual deportation but offer managed reunification with their families, stepping up funding for locally led anti-violence projects in Central America as well as, ultimately, a comprehensive immigration reform that acknowledges the economic contributions and inalienable human rights of currently undocumented immigrants in the United States. 

President Obama seeks federal support for measures that fall mostly into the first category. Meanwhile, Texas Governor Rick Perry announced that he would mobilize the National Guard. As long as migrants fleeing the violence in Central America, which continues to be fed primarily by the United States' insatiable demand for illicit drugs, are framed as a "national security challenge," as opposed to human beings worthy of humanitarian assistance and humane treatment, there is little hope that the situation at the border will improve anytime soon. 

My reading, however, is that the president's current strategy is to buy goodwill from a partially xenophobic House of Representatives through embracing tougher rhetoric and supporting a focus on enforcement in the short run in order to contain the longer-term political fallout from more profound reforms that will hopefully be introduced before his second term comes to an end.

Follow Dr. Esser at http://danielesser.org/

Tags: School of International Service
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 3362427A-E2E5-1EB2-442A3448D1FDBEE9
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 7A39BA44-F2C1-0E18-3824686BF85D0B90
Title: Decoding Aquarius
Author: Gregg Sangillo
Subtitle:
Abstract: School of Communication professor contributes to CNN Series on the 1960s.
Topic: Communications
Publication Date: 07/21/2014
Content:

Towards the end of the rain-soaked Woodstock Festival in August 1969, Jimi Hendrix took his Fender Stratocaster and made music history. He lit into a rendition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" that was sublime and exultant. Yet it was also cacophonous and—like so much else from this time period—controversial. That expression of beauty and chaos, unity and discord, may have been the perfect metaphor for the 1960s.

Was Hendrix channeling the turbulence of the times? Interpretations vary. But just like the national anthem, historians are still trying to untangle everything that happened in the Age of Aquarius. American University School of Communication professor Leonard Steinhorn has intensely studied the era, and now he's providing expertise to CNN's documentary series, The Sixties. He taped commentary for three upcoming episodes, which deal with social movements, 1968, and the counterculture, respectively. "The Times, They are A-Changin'" episode on social movements will air on July 24. The CNN series is presented in collaboration with several veteran film producers, including actor Tom Hanks.

Steinhorn is also an affiliate professor in the History Department, where he teaches a course on the 1960s.

Got a Revolution, Got to Revolution

What ignited such massive social upheaval? In an interview, Steinhorn provides some answers. Steinhorn discusses how a segregated, Jim Crow society was increasingly captured on television. "You had the brutal bombing of the church in Birmingham, the brutalization of Freedom Riders, the fire hoses and the German shepherds attacking people who were peacefully seeking their rights and dignities," he says.

School of Communication professor Leonard Steinhorn teaching

He also describes children growing up in the nuclear age, with accompanying air raid shelters and sirens terrifying them about the future. "They had the sense of either having to pull us back from the brink, or if the world's going to end, we've got to be able to do something about it now," he explains.

Music and alternative publications helped shape a rapidly developing youth culture. You had Mad magazine satirizing middle class conformity. You had rock 'n' roll, which kids increasingly listened to in their cars and out of earshot of their parents. Soul music brought people of all colors onto the same dance floors, he adds.

During the economic boom of the 1950s, the U.S. had a rising need for managers and thinkers to direct the economy. "And how do you get them? You go to universities, which had for years been places of social privilege," Steinhorn says. "You had this growing number of young people who were in universities, and who were there to learn, to ask questions, to see the world, to think critically."

Then, of course, you had the Vietnam War. "That hit everybody in their homes. Either when they were watching it on television, their kids were being drafted and fighting it, or their kids were protesting it," he says.

Sound of Marching, Charging Feet

Steinhorn lectures on 1968 as part of the One Day University program. The totality of what occurred that year was astonishing: Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy assassinated; the Tet Offensive in Vietnam; President Lyndon Johnson decided not to run for re-election; rioting at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago; Columbia University shut down.

"It was not just the rain clouds gathering. It was an electric storm that hot-wired everything at that moment in time," he says. Yet Steinhorn believes the country proved resilient. In 1969, he points out, the U.S. put a man on the moon.

Change Was Gonna Come

Steinhorn believes the countercultural forces of that decade had an overwhelmingly positive impact on American life. He deals with this in his 2006 book, The Greater Generation: In Defense of the Baby Boom Legacy. Many of the ideas forged by early Boomers during the 1960s ushered in today's more inclusive society. Racial bigotry has become taboo, and gender equality is a widely shared goal. Businesses are less hierarchical and more participatory, he says.

"We may look back on the counterculture as a quaint relic of the Sixties, but the values that animated it—express yourself, experiment with the new, find your own God, don't take anything for granted, appreciate nonconformity, feel comfortable in your skin, do your own thing—have permeated American institutions, families, and lives," he writes in his book. 

"The 1960s was a profound cultural shift. It was a shift in the norms of our society. And once the norms of society shift, once the culture begins to shift, the politics will have to follow," he says.

A Little Better, All the Time

Religious Right leaders blame the 1960s for creating a host of social ills, but Steinhorn emphasizes the repressive nature of the oft-romanticized 1950s. To give just one example, he's examined 1950s help wanted ads (which were separated by gender) in venerable newspapers like The New York Times and The Washington Post. "It was, 'Wanted: woman, 5-foot-5 to 5-foot-7 in heels;attractive.' I mean, we are living in a different universe," he says.

Even some 1960s era progressives have deemed the activist movement a failure, or at least a lost opportunity.

"We were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave," wrote Hunter S. Thompson in his early 1970s classic Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. "Now…you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark—that place where the wave finally broke and rolled back."

Yet Steinhorn takes the long view of history. It took decades before Baby Boomers began holding senior positions in business, government, and nonprofits, and changes are starting to reflect that now. "This country has moved in the direction of greater dignity, respect, equality, and freedom. We're not where we need to be, but we're far better than where we were." 

Tags: College of Arts and Sciences,Featured News,Media Relations,Public Communication,School of Communication,History Dept
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 7BB00296-AE20-8397-C6AA1BE69D350192
Profile: 1E9A847C-C93A-EC17-A1FE3AF0DB2821E7
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: B634E6ED-D450-59A1-BAD9165877BFF2F0
Title: AU Museum Receives Gift to Support Washington Art
Author: Rebecca Basu
Subtitle:
Abstract: Alumna and art advocate Carolyn Alper’s gift will establish the Alper Initiative for Washington Art.
Topic: Arts
Publication Date: 07/18/2014
Content:

Washington is fortunate to have a thriving arts community. Now, thanks to a major gift from AU alumna and art advocate Carolyn Alper, BA/CAS '68, to the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, more resources will be allocated to the study and exhibition of Washington art.

Alper's gift will establish the Alper Initiative for Washington Art at the American University Museum. The initiative will dedicate space for displaying the work of Washington artists, including more tightly focused, historical shows; development of space for archives of Washington art (available for both members of the public and AU students); an endowment to support more programming of events, gatherings, lectures and films; and digitization of AU's growing collection of Washington art.

"Carolyn's gift provides American University Museum the funds necessary to elevate Washington art to the place of prominence it deserves," said AU Museum Curator and Director Jack Rasmussen. "All of Washington should be grateful as Carolyn has put her contributions where her heart is."

Rasmussen has made Washington art a priority with two "Washington Art Matters" exhibits and opportunities for regular displays of works by Washington artists. A reviewer with Washington City Paper recently wrote: "For almost a decade, the de facto museum of D.C. art has been at American University… The case has been made: Washington art does matter. All we need is the wall space to display it."

Five of the six exhibits on display at the museum through Aug. 17 feature Washington artists and collectors: Mynd Alive by B.K. ADAMS/I AM ART; Syzygy by William Newman; Continental Drift (Being Here and Being There) by Judy Byron; Passionate Collectors: The Washington Print Club at 50, with prints curated from Washington collections; and The Franz and Virginia Bader Fund: Second Act, with art by grant recipients from the region.

Tags: Alumni,AU Museum,College of Arts and Sciences,Development,Featured News,Giving,Katzen Arts Center,Media Relations
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: B6FE62CA-B8F6-7662-43C61994FFB68D4C
Profile: 230ADB42-AB6C-A94C-055CBD385BE73CC9
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: E3B176DE-B62F-143B-A6A907AC90E723CD
Title: AU Educates the Feds on Inclusion
Author: Patrick Bradley
Subtitle:
Abstract: Government agencies increasingly tap AU for trainings on LGBTQ inclusion.
Topic: In the Community
Publication Date: 07/18/2014
Content:

Revolution Televised

Sara Bendoraitis and Matt Bruno had given their Safe Space presentation dozens of times, but never in five states at once. That is, until June.

The two Center for Diversity & Inclusion staffers stood in front of a packed conference room at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Maryland office, where they were featured speakers for the organization’s first ever LGBT Pride Month celebration.

The pair’s message, on how to create an inclusive workplace, was live streamed to USDA offices as far away as Iowa and Arizona. “It demonstrated why these conversations are important, that the USDA put in so much effort to broadcast it,” Bruno explained. “It’s pretty cool that we impacted not just the people in the room but people in different parts of the country.”

That particular event counts as just one of the many trainings around diversity and inclusion that Bendoraitis and Bruno have conducted for various government agencies and nonprofit organizations—and it certainly won’t be the last.

Student Connection

Of CDI’s core programs, its signature Safe Space training series is perhaps its most celebrated and—increasingly—well known. Established in 2001 and open to AU students, staff, faculty, and community members, these trainings address everything from language around LGBT identities to issues affecting the community.

The success of these workshops at AU has translated into growing attention off campus. Since receiving calls in 2011 from both the USDA and the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., Bruno and Bendoraitis have presented workplace-tailored versions of Safe Space for groups ranging from the Department of Justice to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

The two are even working with the National Institutes of Health to develop the NIH's own Safe Space curriculum and program.

“Largely we’re talking about LGBT diversity in the workplace and how to create an inclusive climate around LGBT issues,” Bendoraitis explained. “We’ve been to some cool places.”

According to Bendoraitis, who is CDI’s director of programming, outreach, and advocacy, the secret to their success both on and off campus comes down to the reason she works in the field: students. 

“Our students go and do great things at these organizations and then talk about the experiences they had at American,” she said. “We both have been able to put ourselves out there as a resource, and our students have been a great voice for us too.”

American Way

When Bruno, CDI’s coordinator of LGBTQ programming, speaks to a crowd of 50 to 75 federal employees, he thinks of AU. Consistently ranked and celebrated for its inclusivity, AU’s campus climate has spread beyond its boarders, due in large part to his own efforts.

“We’re able to do this work with outside organizations because we’re able to do this work at American,” he explained. “The ability for us to have a center that allows us to do 18 Safe Space workshops a year provides us a good foundation to then facilitate other LGBT workshops.”

Since 2001, on-campus Safe Space trainings have expanded to feature more targeted themes, including Unmasking Your Privilege, Trans 101, Paving the Way: Supporting First-Generation College Students, and Creating an Inclusive Community. With all these new titles, the center now offers AU an average of more than two trainings per week during the academic year.

Just as the university worked to foster its campus climate, Bendoraitis sees that government agencies are starting down the same path. “For a lot of folks, it’s the first time they’ve ever had an open dialogue about this,” she said.

With that in mind, Bendoraitis and Bruno will continue making their rounds both on and off AU soil, trying to open conversations and perspectives where possible.

Still, Bruno hopes that one day their presentation—and their faces—won’t need to be broadcast to offices across the country. One day, inclusion will just be a part of the national workplace.

“It reemphasizes how important the work we do on campus is,” he says. “All of these students are going into the workplace. If we can continuously talk to them about how to make more inclusive environments, whether it’s for LGBT people or not, they’re going into the workplace and changing it.”

Tags: Campus Life,Campus News,Gay,Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Ally Resource Center,Multicultural Affairs,Office of Campus Life,Office of Diversity Services,Federal Government
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: E3E94844-FCB6-601B-ECF1A12AB043D94A
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: BDD75839-E436-0222-36B0D49AEF26C80C
Title: AU Updates Tenley Neighbors on WCL Project
Author:
Subtitle:
Abstract: Representatives from American University met recently with Tenleytown neighbors to provide an update on construction at the new Washington College of Law (WCL).
Topic: Buildings
Publication Date: 07/17/2014
Content:

Representatives from American University, Whiting-Turner, and the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) met recently with Tenleytown neighbors, representatives of Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3E, the Tenleytown Historical Society, and the Tenley Neighbors Association to provide an update on the current phase of construction at the new Washington College of Law (WCL).

Neighbors were briefed about the conclusion of excavation and the project’s transition to the concrete-pouring phase. They also were told of the completion of the selective demolition inside Capital Hall and the Chapel, and about the installation underway currently of wall foundations and under-slab utilities at the lower parking garage level.

Additionally, presentations were made regarding the proposed traffic circles at 42nd and Warren Streets, a new sidewalk along Warren Street, and a neighborhood request to close or make the block of Warren Street that borders the WCL site into a one-way street.

“Providing regular updates to our neighbors is a big part of all of our projects,” said AU’s Director of Community Relations, Andrew Huff. “Our Tenley neighbors have been very supportive of the WCL project and we look forward to continuing our relationship with them when the project is complete.”

When construction is complete in fall 2015, WCL will be among the most technically advanced law schools in the country and the only one with a courthouse. The 312,000 square feet, light-filled, LEED-certified facility, will include flexible teaching spaces, expanded clinic space, teaching courtrooms, and multiple indoor and outdoor student study and meeting spaces throughout the campus. The enhanced Pence Law Library also will feature an Alumni Center that will provide the more than 18,000 alumni with research and business resources when they visit. The Tenley Campus also is located one block from the Metro, giving the legal community, business leaders, government officials, and alumni better access to the law school while providing students with a direct line to the heart of Washington, D.C.

Read more about the WCL or view the live webcam.

Tags: DC Community,Tenleytown,Community and Local Government Relations
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: AA028986-02E7-2EDC-1EF8F27286481FF7
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 53FB7DC5-EEB7-8C02-CD4706D09123BFCE
Title: Vaccination Research
Author: Jamie McCrary
Subtitle:
Abstract: Team of College students win award for study on vaccines and socioeconomics.
Topic: Research
Publication Date: 07/17/2014
Content:

AU rising sophomore Andrew Episcopo is committed to exploring his many interests—both through his interdisciplinary classes and through his research. This past March, Episcopo and his classmates Hannah Lappin and Alix Braun presented their study on vaccines and socioeconomics at the 2014 Mathias Student Research Conference. Together they won “Best Poster in the Sciences by a Freshman or Sophomore.”  

The Mathias Student Research Conference is an annual College of Arts and Sciences event, which provides a competitive forum for undergraduate and graduate students to present original research. Participants submit a research paper or poster, which is judged on intellectual ambition, originality and clarity of argument, and overall presentation of information. 

Episcopos’ research compared people’s opinions of vaccines to their socioeconomic status and religious affiliation, giving him the opportunity to connect his interest in public health to economics and sociology. Episcopo and his colleagues conducted surveys asking questions such as, “What is your opinion of mandatory childhood vaccinations?” and “Have you been vaccinated for tetanus or pneumonia?” The team administered a total of 60 surveys over a three- month period, interviewing people on the streets of DC and through Qualtrics, an online survey platform.  

Once responses were collected, Episcopo and his team compared answers to two separate categories: income level and religious involvement. Results indicated that the stronger one’s religious affiliation was, the less supportive they were of vaccines. Similarly, respondents with lower income levels also expressed lower support of vaccinations.  

Though these were the study’s main conclusions, Episcopo’s research also revealed another important finding: when vaccines aren’t mandatory, the number of people getting vaccinated drops significantly. Episcopo hopes that his findings will encourage people to get vaccinated, and will help the public stay healthy. “Vaccinations have been down lately. Lots of old diseases are coming back because people aren’t vaccinating against them anymore,” he says. “If one person doesn’t get vaccinated, then a lot of people are at risk. Making people aware of why vaccines are important will help make a difference.” 

Originally from Monroeville, Pennsylvania, Episcopo is currently an undeclared major, but is considering pursuing Communications, Law, Economics, and Government studies (CLEG) in the School of Public Affairs. As an interdisciplinary major, CLEG would enable him to explore multiple fields, perhaps also providing the opportunity for additional interdisciplinary research.  

Episcopo believes his classes at AU have helped inform his interest in CLEG, as well as develop a particular interest in law. “Like public health, law is a field that intersects with a lot of different fields and affects nearly everything in our society, so I think it’s a really important subject to study,” he says.

Tags: Research,Students,College of Arts and Sciences
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 5453271E-B6CC-CA8B-6175C25FCD527DEF
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 528B08A1-E5C2-839A-95ADD62FDB84DE15
Title: Day in the Life of a Musician
Author: Nancy Jo Snider
Subtitle:
Abstract: Music Program Director Nancy Jo Snider gives insight into the duties of a professional musician.
Topic: Arts
Publication Date: 07/17/2014
Content:

Music Program Director Nancy Jo Snider, ‘cellist, educator, and administrator, is a full-time senior professorial lecturer in the Department of Performing Arts.  

A multi-faceted career is “de rigueur” for artists. Playing my ‘cello in everything from period instrument performances of French Baroque music at the Opera Royal in the Palace of Versailles, to avant-garde solo playing with a Czech theatre company in South Africa, is all part of a day’s work.  

The joy of sharing the training and knowledge that has made this possible is what informs much of my teaching. Additionally, my teaching philosophy remains grounded in meeting my students where they are and helping them to their appropriate next step. Organization and communication are essential to juggling such a rich life, and it is here that my administrative talents are put to the test.  

But directing a program is not just about these details. There is a constant striving for excellence in the AU Music Program that requires vision, leadership, and the ability to engage all of the program’s components to keep it moving in a positive direction.  

 

There is no such thing as a daily task list—besides always checking email—but...

7:30 a.m.
The two E’s: espresso and e-mail.  

9:00 a.m.
Meetings with faculty, my Director’s Musicians of Accomplishment, other students, and members of the community to discuss new Music Program and Department of Performing Arts ventures and options for upcoming performances. 

11:45 a.m.
Time to teach University College Understanding Music, an introduction to musical language, to a group of 15 students. I love having the opportunity to share something I am passionate about with those who are also interested and to see their understanding grow as a result. That is the best!  

1:00 p.m.
Cortado at the Dav!  

2:00 p.m.
Afternoons are spent teaching ‘cello lessons and directing the chamber music ensembles. The ensembles perform around the DC area, and we always want to be ready for the next performance. 

4:00 p.m.
Student advising is an important part of directing the Music Program. We serve hundreds of students, and I want to make sure all of them reach their goals after graduation—whether that is attending graduate school, performing, or entering the work force. The best of our music majors are competitive with the best majors anywhere!  

5:00 p.m.
Time to exercise—either going biking, swimming, walking, or visiting the gym. 

8:00 p.m.
I make time to practice in the evening, typically 15 to 20 hours a week.  

11:00 p.m.
Reading the novel du jour. I’ll read (almost) anything, but particularly value the classics. Proust, Faulkner, and Joyce are my top three favorite authors. I also have a deep connection to the novels from the American South and follow the Booker Prize winners with special interest. 

My days also include rehearsals and performing (or attending performances). There is no typical “day in the life” for a teaching musician, only the certainty that the day will be very full with all of the wonderful opportunities we are so lucky to have.

Tags: Music,Performing Arts,Performing Arts Dept
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 52D5FDD3-BCB2-1341-2E1C984DF4E86235
Profile: 21431B71-01D7-C268-AB43EE74CC477EF5
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 79982250-9B99-F26B-8CDA15CFD419D373
Title: Student Media Leader: Julia Reinstein
Author: Jordan-Marie Smith
Subtitle:
Abstract: A lesson in storytelling and real-world experience.
Topic: Journalism
Publication Date: 07/16/2014
Content:

American University student media leaders share their experiences and lessons learned working at various AU media outlets, and discuss how SOC has contributed to their success.

Organization: Her Campus & American Word
Major: Print Journalism
Internship: New York Magazine




In what capacity have you worked with AU student media organizations?

I'm currently a contributing writer for HerCampus and copy editor/sex columnist for AmWord.

What is your year and major?
Rising senior, print journalism major with a minor in philosophy.

How does your major support your roles in student media?
I love that I can take what I learn in my journalism classes and then practice those skills in HerCampus and AmWord. My classes help me to be more successful in student media, and student media helps me to be more successful in the classroom.

What SOC classes have been relevant to your role in student media?
For student media to succeed, it has to be on the cutting edge of technology and social media. Amy Eisman's Writing and Editing for Convergent Media class taught me so much about journalism on the web. Rodger Streitmatter's reporting class also taught me a lot. I didn't just learn how to report, write and edit in his class—I learned what makes a story truly great and how I can emulate that.

How have your internships played a role in your student media success?
I'm currently the digital editorial intern at New York Magazine. One of the biggest benefits of writing for student media is building a portfolio of writing samples, many of which I used when applying to New York Magazine. College is the time to start figuring out what you like to write about, and student media gives you an outlet to experiment.

What are your plans post graduation?
After graduation, I'd like to go into feature writing for a magazine or online publication.



Tags: School of Communication,Journalism (SOC),Print Journalism,Internship
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 79AD6A92-D6BD-F48B-4B98D273410CF0EB
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 557F2EE6-0B5B-17CF-4DAA4883F09BBE73
Title: Jane Palmer to Advise on National Study
Author: Dave DeFusco
Subtitle:
Abstract: Jane Palmer, professiorial lecturer, will take part in a 42-month national study to assess the rate of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women.
Topic: Achievements
Publication Date: 07/15/2014
Content:

A national study funded by the National Institute of Justice will assess the rate of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women.

“Existing research indicates that violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women is a critical public health and public safety issue,” said Jane Palmer, a technical advisor to the study and professorial lecturer at the School of Public Affairs at American University.

The Violence Against Women Act of 2005 mandates that the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), in consultation with the Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women, conduct a national baseline study on violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women living in Indian country.

The 42-month study, which is the first comprehensive national effort of its kind, will examine domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking against American Indian and Alaska Native women; identify factors that place these women at risk for victimization; evaluate the effectiveness of federal, state, tribal and local responses to violence; and propose recommendations for improving effectiveness of those responses.

Under the direction of the NIJ, American Indian Development Associates (AIDA) based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, will partner with Palmer, Michelle Chino, an associate professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and RTI International to implement the study.

Palmer worked on a national baseline pilot study for three years as a doctoral student and will assist in instrument refinement, field interviewer training, data analysis, and report writing and dissemination.

National and regional studies have found that violence against women is more widespread and severe among self-identified American Indian and Alaska Native women than among other North Americans. There are 566 federally recognized tribes in the United States, and at least 300 additional tribes have petitioned for federal and state recognition.

“Accurate, comprehensive and current information on the incidence, prevalence and nature of crime and victimization is critically needed,” said Palmer. “The national baseline study will improve our understanding of the programmatic, service and policy needs of the women in these communities, and it will educate and inform policy-makers and the public about the threat to their health and well-being.”

Tags: Faculty,School of Public Affairs,Public Administration & Policy
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 83E8457C-F5D8-94B8-D6E6D33696EB471F
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 51B3985C-0C53-E149-4B05C69984954B80
Title: How One Conference Changed Accounting Students’ Career Outlooks
Author: Laura Herring
Subtitle:
Abstract: Annual conference provides accounting undergraduates the opportunity to meet current professionals and peers.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 07/15/2014
Content:

Executive-in-Residence Emily Lindsay knows there's more to accounting education than can be covered in the classroom. That’s why she encourages students to attend the annual Virginia Society of Certified Public Accountants' (VSCPA) Leaders' Institute.

The two-day event provides networking and skill-building sessions with accounting professionals and students from other schools in the region.

This year, five Kogod students attended the conference; this is what they had to say.

Devon Wallick, BS Accounting '16
Hometown: Barrington, Rhode Island

The highlight of the event was when all the participants and coordinators of the conference had a chance to relax with pizza and air hockey and get to know each other. After a long day of informative presentations and networking it was nice to just hang out with my friends who would eventually be my colleagues.

With the [stereotype] about accounting majors being boring, it was nice to see how much fun and lively this group was. It renewed my faith in the accounting field and left me with a lot of great memories.

Blaise Fairfax, BS Accounting '15
Hometown:
Oak Ridge, New Jersey

The event certainly met my expectations and exceeded them. I was able to go to a career fair that had almost 30 employers available to [learn about] their different opportunities and cultures.

The highlight of the event was a speech called "Setting Yourself Up for Success" with Kevin Wright, a campus recruiter with Baker Tilly. It was about specific steps to take while in school to present yourself as an educated, professional candidate to get jobs. Beyond that, he focused on asking yourself why and where you want to end up in the future and solidifying your own values. Being forced to answer those questions has allowed me to be more confident in what I want in my job search.

It was great meeting new people and learning about their different school environments, accounting programs, and potential career paths. In particular, speaking with other students made me realize how many opportunities Kogod offers for its students.

Eliza Hughes, BS Accounting '15
Hometown:
Kennebunk, Maine

[Before the VSCPA conference] I was unsure of what exactly I wanted to do with a degree in accounting and [Emily Lindsay] thought that this would be a good chance for me to get insight into the industry and all of the career opportunities available.

I wasn't sure exactly what I would get out of the event other than learning about the industry, but I got so much more out of it than I had imagined.

I would recommend the Leaders' Institute to any accounting student, whether they know what they want to do or are still as clueless as I was. Getting the chance to interact with other accounting students and industry professionals allowed me to learn about my career options and start to solidify a plan for my future. It was really an invaluable experience.

Brent Sabot, BS Accounting '17
Hometown:
Laurel, Maryland

[I began Kogod] in the BS Finance program, but I will be changing to BS [Accounting] this fall, largely because of my positive experience at the VSCPA Leaders' Institute.

Throughout the spring semester, [Emily] Lindsay advised me on career opportunities in accounting. She encouraged me to attend the event to get a greater perspective. I ultimately attended because I knew it would be an in-depth experience to compare accounting careers to my knowledge of finance careers.

The event exceeded my expectations because there was plenty of learning about the field of accounting, but also plenty of information about professionalism, resumes, internships, etc. After leaving the Leaders' Institute, I felt much more informed and prepared to speak with campus recruiters and other accounting professionals. It was a great experience to have before the busy on-campus recruiting season in the fall.

Tags: Kogod School of Business
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 51DD1C91-F8A5-3042-47970B537391BD20
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 4C906210-D2FE-70DD-DF16EDF0E991D974
Title: SPA Ranked Among Top Universities for Institutional Impact on Research
Author:
Subtitle:
Abstract: The Journal of Public Affairs Education released a new index that awarded SPA high marks in research in the field of public administration.
Topic: Achievements
Publication Date: 07/15/2014
Content:

American University's School of Public Affairs is ranked 5th worldwide, 3rd in the U.S., and 1st in the Washington, DC area for institutional impact on research in the field of public administration, according to a new study published in the Journal of Public Affairs Education.  

To create the index, study authors surveyed public administration journals to determine quantity of articles published by an institution's faculty, quality of the journals in which those articles appear, and overall institutional impact. The score is based on five years of manuscripts published in Thompson Reuters Journal Citation Report-indexed public administration journals.  

American University was ranked 4th for quality of journals in which articles appear and 9th for quantity of articles published. The results also indicate the University's upward trajectory in recent years –data broken out by year shows American University's ranking climbed steadily from 31st to 5th over the five years of the study.  

"School of Public Affairs faculty members share a commitment to world-class teaching and high-impact research," said Barbara Romzek, dean of the School of Public Affairs. "To see that commitment come to life in our ranking in this index is truly exciting."

Tags: School of Public Affairs
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 4CE1B22B-B97E-912E-320A5D80A40D0FF8
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 87DE58A8-C0E5-53FB-F6C7377D5CE8A065
Title: Jon Gould to Join National Science Foundation
Author: Dave DeFusco
Subtitle:
Abstract: Gould will join the National Science Foundation as a visiting director of its Law and Social Sciences Program.
Topic: Achievements
Publication Date: 07/11/2014
Content:

Professor Jon Gould, chair of the Department of Justice, Law & Criminology and director of the Washington Institute for Public Affairs Research in the School of Public Affairs, has been named a director of the Law and Social Sciences Program at the National Science Foundation. His one-year appointment begins in September.

"This is a tremendous honor for Jon, recognizing as it does his leadership in the field of law and society and his experience in grant-funded research," said Barbara Romzek, dean of the School of Public Affairs. "It also benefits us in the long run, helping to raise the profile of the school in such circles and bringing Jon's heightened experience back to SPA when the position ends."

Gould will help steer $6 million in grant money toward research in the fields of law and social sciences. "It will be a chance to immerse myself in research on law and social sciences and help support future scholarship in those areas," he said.

He will remain director of the Washington Institute for Public Affairs Research (WIPAR) and chair of Justice, Law & Criminology through the end of July. While on leave at NSF, he will continue to advise and work with SPA doctoral students.

WIPAR serves as a bridge between academic researchers and the public affairs community, including public agencies, corporations, private foundations, nonprofit organizations and media. It advises faculty in conceptualizing and operationalizing their research and assists researchers in grant-funding.

With WIPAR's encouragement and support, research proposals generated by SPA faculty and the amount of grant funding have increased steadily over the last three years, and almost all of SPA's new faculty have submitted research proposals on some project that has been funded.

"This appointment is a natural progression from WIPAR," Gould said. "At the NSF, I'll be helping to support research and advance important projects of scholars across the country. I'll see part of the grants process from the other side."

A lawyer and social scientist, Gould combines empirical research with policy advocacy to promote government reform and administration. His work focuses on civil rights and liberties, justice policy and legal change, helping to make academic research relevant and accessible to policymaking. Over the past three years, he has led the Preventing Wrongful Convictions Project. Funded by the National Institute of Justice, Gould directed a team of nine in examining how the criminal justice system avoids wrongful convictions.

He has published on the subjects of wrongful convictions, hate speech, sexual harassment, criminal defense, police compliance with the Constitution, and judicial treatment of race and gender. His first book, Speak No Evil: The Triumph of Hate Speech Regulation, was a co-winner of the 2006 Herbert Jacob award for the best book in law and society. His second book, The Innocence Commission: Preventing Wrongful Convictions and Restoring the Criminal Justice System, was named an Outstanding Academic Title for 2008 by the American Library Association. Gould has been a U.S. Supreme Court Fellow, is a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation, and has served on multiple scholarly and policy boards. He has won awards for his scholarship, teaching, and service.

Gould sees his NSF appointment as an opportunity to share with his SPA colleagues the ideas and areas in social sciences that are being funded, the pressing scholarly issues that should be addressed, and the ways to make faculty research more visible.

"It will also be a chance to give back to American University," he said.

Tags: Justice, Law & Society
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: BDEC9DAD-EC05-A206-F82D3493F41C300A
Profile: 45B917FD-F14A-3C25-84770A99F0764D19
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 7B3EAA36-FE47-266D-DEB3ECE4B1F6688E
Title: AU Grad Unlocks Hidden Treasures in the Big Apple
Author: Kristena Wright
Subtitle:
Abstract: Corey Schneider, Kogod/BSBA ’11, creates a new exploration-driven community named the New York Adventure Club.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 07/11/2014
Content:

Three years ago, Corey Schneider moved to New York, armed with a business administration degree and a dual concentration in marketing and entrepreneurship and innovation, from the Kogod School of Business. Working as associate retention marketing manager for one of the largest media companies in the world, Time Inc., he was living the life. Or was he?  

"I live in the best city in the world and still haven't explored it," he says he realized of his time in the city. That's when he decided to go out every weekend and explore places off the beaten path. He used Google to find the different boroughs, but says he jokes that he had to bribe friends to go with him. "I can't believe no one wants to do this with me," he thought.

This pushed Corey into action. It started with a group he created on Facebook in December 2013. Originally named the New York Adventure Club for Non-Boring People, he decided to cut it down, as to not offend. It became, as it is now, the New York Adventure Club. As a contributor to untappedcities.com., writing articles for them had prepared him for his new vision. Untappedcities.com is a website where contributors share their experience uncovering the best of urban life from cities across the globe. 

"New York has such breathtaking hidden gems. This group helps my time in NY be more fulfilling. People don't take full advantage of their cities. I'm trying to make an overwhelming feat digestible," he observed. After about a month on FB, he took it a step further and began booking events. He started with three or four free tours, but his first post only garnered two responses. 

A post about the Brooklyn Army Terminal changed his luck. "I'll never forget the day. I was at work on a Friday afternoon, and over 100 people joined the group in one hour! I freaked out because no secure ticketing plan had been put into place. I just hadn't thought that far ahead," he shares.

The New York Adventure Club is now an active community of more than 600 local urbanites looking to uncover the hidden treasures in their city and meet great people along the way. 

Corey points out, "There's a need to understand the city better. New York Adventure Club helps locals check out places they haven't heard or thought of before. It also gives them an easy way to uncover their hometown treasures. With a simple RSVP, locals can attend a unique, private, or exclusive, tour while connecting with a community of like-minded urban explorers." 

The sole operator of the company, Corey sends out an event newsletter every Friday that features affordable and practical weekend events organized by borough. Every event is now a ticketed opportunity. "People have no excuse not to go out and try at least one," he says.

Corey shares that his time at AU really opened his eyes to his business interests. His management and marketing classes proved extremely helpful. "You take classes thinking the real world doesn't operate the way you learn. Once you get out and witness that it does happen that way, you're excited about being knowledgeable."

Tags: Alumni,Alumni Update,Kogod School of Business
Publication: DC9BFA6D-C400-714B-030527285D7B0492
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 812B57B3-EC4A-9130-E3803A5016B74F83
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 7A898026-0CE7-7ADA-5A44C1D452E7C750
Title: Professor Chronicles Link Between Police Repression and Race Riots
Author: Antoaneta Tileva
Subtitle:
Abstract: Associate Professor Cathy Schneider’s new book, Police Power and Race Riots: Urban Unrest in Paris and New York, traces the history of urban upheaval in New York and Paris, focusing on the interaction between police and minority youth.
Topic: International
Publication Date: 07/11/2014
Content:

Associate Professor Cathy Schneider’s new book, Police Power and Race Riots: Urban Unrest in Paris and New York, traces the history of urban upheaval in New York and Paris, focusing on the interaction between police and minority youth. Schneider found that riots erupt when political elites activate racial boundaries, police engage in racialized violence, and racial minorities lack alternative avenues of redress.

Schneider, an expert on social movements, collective violence, policing, criminal justice, immigration, and racial and ethnic discrimination, says the book evolved out of her community work where she encountered first-hand the police harassment and racial profiling of minority communities. "This made me wonder about conducting a comparative study between what I saw in New York and somewhere else. I wanted to see how the French police were similar or different in their treatment of minority communities.” 

Then, on October 27, 2005, an African boy and an Arab boy, 15-year-old Bouna Traore and 17-year-old Zyed Benna, were electrocuted while hiding from police in a power substation in the Paris suburb of Clichy-sous-Bois. A third teenager suffered serious burns. This sparked riots against police brutality and harassment in Paris and other French cities that lasted several weeks.  

Schneider became interested in why these cases led to riots in France, while similar cases did not lead to riots in New York. Schneider began her research in Paris by interviewing the families of victims of police violence, including the brother of one of the deceased teenagers. One of her main findings was that in racially divided unequal societies, police are tasked with the job of enforcing racial boundaries. The activation of racial boundaries, Schneider found, makes violent explosions more likely. As communities are polarized along an “us vs. them” boundary and there are no avenues of redress, riots are more likely to spark. 

Schneider also discovered that political campaigns shaped how police understood their jobs. In studying campaigns, she found that candidates in tight elections often won by appealing to racial fears. “These fears are often coded as ‘wars on crime’ or ‘drugs’ or ‘illegal immigration,’” she explains. In such a context, police are rewarded for increasing the number of arrests and for targeting minorities.  

Schneider says that the reason there have not been race riots in New York since the 1960s is the presence of options of redress that dampen social unrest. Community organizers in New York have developed a “standard non-violent repertoire” to protest police brutality. State and federal courts also opened to minority plaintiffs and allow minorities to sue on a civil and not just criminal basis, which helps to diffuse tensions. The availability of avenues of redress, Schneider postulates, is the variable that differentiates New York from Paris.  

Follow Professor Schneider on Twitter at @schneidercathy1.

Watch a Spotlight video with Professor Schneider about her research.

Tags: School of International Service
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 7AB6D961-97A8-861A-4FDC4743D9175414
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 78E383A4-0AE9-A432-8717E1806A25C568
Title: Alumni Board Member Brings AU Spirit to Texas
Author: Isaac W. K. Thweatt
Subtitle:
Abstract: Discover what motivates Houston alumnus Robert W. Johnson, Esq., SPA/BA ’81 to give his time and talent to AU.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 07/11/2014
Content:

Houston alumnus Rob Johnson, SPA/BA '81, proudly serves the Eagle alumni family as a member of the SPA Dean's Council, and as Awards and Scholarship Committee chair for the AU Alumni Board. We recently caught up with Rob to learn why he keeps close AU ties through his participation in Houston recruitment events, SPA and Alumni Board activities, reunions, charitable giving and good ol' storytelling. 

AU: Can you tell our fellow Eagles a bit more about yourself, your family, profession, and passions?

Rob: My wife, Christine, and I have two great sons –one is a college sophomore and another will be entering his senior year in high school, and two border collies. I'm proud to say that both our sons were members of their high school marching band and Eagle Scouts.  

After law school, I was in private practice in DC, and then joined Mobil Corporation.  Here at Exxon Mobil Corporation, I am Assistant General Counsel, and my responsibilities include leading a team of more than 50 lawyers and associated support staff, and serving on the ExxonMobil Law Department Management Committee. My areas of responsibility including environmental & safety, labor &employment, global procurement, and real estate, as well as developing our professional staff. It's important to me and our company that we keep great people in the Exxon Mobil family.

AU: Houston, Texas is very different from Spring Valley. Is that "home"?

Rob: It is now, but I was the oldest of four kids raised in Norwalk, Connecticut. (My dad worked in Manhattan.) Of course, DC was home during college and law school, and for a number of years after.

AU: Ah…so how did you find out about American University?

Rob: I always thought I would be interested in government, politics, or law. I came to D.C. as a kid and was enthralled. Coming to D.C. for school was a must! After I attended a college fair in Hartford, I simply requested information from AU and made my decision based on the pamphlets. We didn't have what kids have today in terms of online research tools and things like that.

AU: Well, looking back at AU when you were a student, how has the university changed or stayed the same?

Rob: The campus has always been beautiful, so that's the same;but across the board, I have seen other positive changes. Let's start with the infrastructure. It's dramatically different. The Katzen Arts Center alone is a world class museum and instructional space. The new SIS building is really impressive also.

Also, we had no gym when I was at AU . I remember trips to Fort Myers for AU basketball games. (I'll never forget the 1983 AU vs. Georgetown basketball game where Gordon Austin hit the winning shot over pre-NBA playing Patrick Ewing at the old Capital Center.)

I think another huge change is the perception that AU was a "safety" or "commuter" school back in my day, and now, it's a destination and really holds its own with the other very strong DC universities. There's a feeling that we are unique…and strong…and we believe it.

AU: We know that you love AU, so much so that you volunteer for two different boards. What excites you about volunteering for AU?

Rob: If I had to point to one thing it would be President Kerwin and the culture he has established. For me, institutional culture starts at the top…you have to set a tone. When Dr. Kerwin and Dr. Minar came to Texas to meet with me a few years ago to talk about my thoughts as an alum, I was surprised and impressed they would take the time to reach out like that. That had not happened before. I really feel AU is on the upswing, and everyone wants to be a part of a place that is positive and working to sustain excellence.  

Plus, I'm at the point in my life where you do think about giving back. In 1981, I didn't understand the importance of networking, and now I want to be a part of it. My wife and I have established an SPA scholarship because we remember what it was like to need help in school.

AU: Considering your work for a Fortune 10 company, what advice might you have for students, aspiring lawyers, and young alumni? 

Rob: If you're still a student, results matter. Work hard, and broaden yourself. Challenge yourself to new experiences. They may lead to new avenues that have never before been walked. Be externally engaged, and by that I mean be intellectually curious and willing to widen your reach.  

For the aspiring lawyers, be serious that it is what you want to do. It's more than just being smart, and you have to be honest with yourself that this is something you want to work hard at.

For young alumni I'd say don't be afraid of not liking your first job. You're going to get another... get out there and do it...take chances and risk, particularly while you're young. And, network, network, network. Personal connections matter very much, no matter how much great technology we have at our fingertips.

Tags: Alumni,Alumni Board,Alumni Update
Publication: DC9BFA6D-C400-714B-030527285D7B0492
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 816AEB0E-A5EC-5518-89EF1FD2AF33ECA9
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 539CA1B9-F33C-0C9B-9D3D4AC8FC00E81B
Title: Storytelling across Cambodia
Author: Patty Housman
Subtitle:
Abstract: Graduate student wins Fulbright- National Geographic Fellowship.
Topic: Social Sciences
Publication Date: 07/10/2014
Content:

Erin Moriarty Harrelson, a PhD candidate in anthropology, received a Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellowship. She was one of five grantees selected from among 864 applicants for the fellowship, which is the first of its kind. 

Moriarty Harrelson will travel to Cambodia for nine months, exploring the emerging culture of deaf Cambodians. She herself is deaf and will use video, text, photographs, maps, and drawings to document the lives of deaf Cambodians as they encounter each other for the first time and learn Cambodian Sign Language—a new language that is still being developed and documented. She will travel across Cambodia to Phnom Penh, Kampot, Kampong Cham, Battambang, Sihanoukville, and Siem Reap to collect stories and share them with a global audience on nationalgeographic.com

Moriarty Harrelson says that she was guided through the application process by professors of anthropology Dolores Koenig, William Leap, and Audrey Cooper, along with Chris Swanson, assistant director, Office of Merit Awards. They helped her develop her project, and they wrote testimonies about her ability to overcome challenges. 

“I would not have this incredible opportunity without the support of American University,” said Moriarty Harrelson. “I am proud to be affiliated with AU because of the unwavering support I have received from fellow students and the faculty in the Department of Anthropology. This department’s scholarship epitomizes social justice and community activism.” 

Swanson said that the fellowship’s digital storytelling focus is perfect for Moriarty Harrelson. “Video is such an intuitive way to capture the story of people using sign language,” he said. “There is something deeply alluring about Erin’s topic—the emergence of a post-Khmer Rouge deaf culture in Cambodia. She is able to witness a new culture coming into being, and as a deaf anthropologist she's uniquely qualified to capture this story." 

Cambodia and the Search for a Shared Language 

More than 30 years after the fall of the Khmer Rouge regime, Cambodia continues to rebuild itself. One of the ensuing cultural shifts is a growing sense of shared identity among deaf people. Another, according to Moriarty Harrelson, is the “creativity and tenacity of Cambodians, especially deaf Cambodians, who navigated social upheaval and found other ways to communicate without a national sign language. 

When Moriarty Harrelson first visited Cambodia in 2009 she encountered a deaf woman selling scarves at a market. The woman did not know sign language but was able to communicate effectively and confidently with tourists through a series of gestures. In her Fulbright personal statement, Moriarty Harrelson wrote, “In a way, being deaf was an advantage as she was uninhibited by the lack of a shared spoken language and easily found other ways to communicate with people who do not sign.” 

Preparing for the Fellowship

Moriarty Harrelson returned to Cambodia on research trips in 2012 and 2013 and learned digital ethnography. On her second trip she observed deaf Cambodians teaching sign language to other deaf people, some of whom were seeing it for the first time. During these trips she traveled widely, gathering stories. 

“When I conducted preliminary fieldwork in 2013,” Moriarty Harrelson wrote, “I met deaf individuals in several cities across Cambodia with compelling stories—a circus performer in Battambang, a Cham man whose parents scoured the country for a woman willing to marry their deaf son, traditional dancers in Siem Reap, an NGO worker teaching sign language in rural communes in Kampong Cham, and garment workers in Phnom Penh earning less than their counterparts because they are deaf.” 

Before her departure for her upcoming trip, Moriarty Harrelson will receive training by National Geographic staff in digital storytelling techniques, including effective blog writing, video production, and photography. A National Geographic editor will mentor her throughout her trip. 

When she returns, Moriarty Harrelson will complete her PhD studies at AU. She received an MA in public anthropology from AU in 2013. She also earned an MA in communication in contemporary society from Johns Hopkins University and a BA in art history and anthropology from Smith College. She has worked for the American School for the Deaf, Telecommunications for the Deaf (TDI), and Gallaudet University.

Tags: Anthropology,Anthropology Dept,Career Center,College of Arts and Sciences,Office of Merit Awards,Featured News
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 53DF46C4-E90D-C596-CC1F35F73DBE0FC9
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 521CB22E-E433-737C-F9E236CC593E0A75
Title: AU Night at Nationals Park
Author: Traci Crockett
Subtitle:
Abstract: On Friday, August 22, the AU community will celebrate the university’s partnership with the Washington Nationals.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 07/10/2014
Content:

Many in the Washington area think the Nationals are poised for the pennant race in 2014. And for the third year in a row, American University is front and center at Nationals Park. 

On Friday, August 22, the AU community will gather once again to celebrate its own community alongside thousands of baseball fans. AU's Night at Nationals Park is an evening of Nats baseball and AU fun for generations of Eagles. Quickly becoming a tradition for alumni and students alike, this event is not to be missed!

Before the Nats take on the San Francisco Giants in a 7:05 p.m. game, alumni, students, faculty, and staff will gather for a picnic dinner on the stadium's main concourse. Guests will enjoy burgers, hot dogs, salad, kettle chips, and watermelon, along with visits from Clawed Z. Eagle and Skreech, the Nationals' mascot. 

T-shirts will be given away to the first 25,000 fans to enter the stadium that evening. No one will want to miss the game's opening ceremonies, with a special, soon-to-be-announced AU celebrity throwing out the first pitch and a moving performance of the National Anthem by Treble in Paradise, one of AU's popular student a cappella groups.

Tickets to AU Night at the Nationals are $25 each for alumni and their guests. Each includes the picnic dinner and a seat in the outfield section. Guests will pick up tickets at a special will-call space outside the stadium.  

Nats fans are enjoying American University brand messages and in-game WONK challenges throughout the season in 2014, as AU renewed its successful partnership with the Washington Nationals for a third year. The nationally renowned WONK campaign is featured at many home games with signs around the infield, scoreboard animation, and more. Plus, alumni, students, faculty, and staff can take advantage of special discounted tickets throughout the rest of the season. To purchase tickets for regular season games, visit nationals.com/wonk and select the game of your choice. Click "BUY TICKETS", enter coupon code WONK, and click APPLY.

Enjoy the Nats all summer long, but be sure to join us on August 22 for AU's Night at Nationals Park!

Tags: Alumni,Alumni Newsletter,Alumni Relations,Alumni Update,Featured News
Publication: DC9BFA6D-C400-714B-030527285D7B0492
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 0FCC699B-0AF4-59B5-9AE6FA2243E4393B
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 1C6538DE-BABC-DA38-BC1A85A5E7B772C9
Title: What is Campus Life Reading This Summer?
Author: Patrick Bradley
Subtitle:
Abstract: Need some summer literary recommendations? OCL’s got you covered.
Topic: On Campus
Publication Date: 07/10/2014
Content:

With a quiet campus and summer vacations in full swing, many Campus Life staff members are hitting the books. From brain candy reads to historical epics, take a look at what fellow staffers are enjoying this summer!

Amanda Harrison, Accommodations Coordinator, Academic Support & Access Center

I'm currently reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon. I saw it recommended on a disability-related reads list online. I'm always reading disability-related stuff. It gives you a fairly good perspective on autism, as it's told from the perspective of a teenager with autism. 

Amanda Harrison;

It provides some insight into what it might be like to be somebody with autism, and what it's like to be in the world with that. It's interesting because we have an increasing population of those students on campus who are not much older than this character.

I'm trolling for recommendations on what to read next. I have an embarrassing love of young adult literature. In the summer, it's like brain candy. I read a lot of it. That's what the summer is for, brain candy reading.


Tim Staples;

Tim Staples, Assistant Director for Training and Leadership Development Programs, Housing & Dining Programs

I am currently reading The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson. I had the opportunity to purchase this book at a conference almost three years ago, and it has sat on my shelf since that time. Listening to my mother, who is now 70 years of age, and my aunt talking about their childhood on Buford Plantation in Mississippi really caused me to pick up the book and begin reading. Growing up I would always hear my mother and father talk about their time in the segregated, Jim Crow South.

One of the most interesting conversations I recently revisited with my mother centered on the family's decision to migrate north to St. Louis. This conversation also included information about the 1955 murder of Emmett Till [nearby in Mississippi]. I learned that my grandfather worked at Tutwiller Funeral Home, where Emmett Till's body was prepared to be sent to Chicago. It was at that moment my grandfather decided that it would be best to move his family to St. Louis for their safety.

I plan to read the 1945 book A Street in Bronzeville by Gwendolyn Brooks next to participate in the Books that Shaped America program sponsored by the AU Library.


Michael Wargo;

Michael Wargo, Technology Coordinator, Office of the Vice President

I'm currently reading a book called The Johnstown Girls. It's historic fiction, which is one of my favorite genres. It's about these twin girls who were separated during the Johnstown Flood in 1889. One hundred years later, one of the girls reveals she had a twin that she lost during the flood, but the reader knows her sister is still alive. I haven't finished it yet, but my guess is the two sisters will reunite at the end. 

I'm enjoying the book because a local Pennsylvanian author wrote it. It chronicles the story of the flood, which I find fascinating, and it also throws in local Johnstown landmarks. For anyone from the area, I would definitely recommend it. Even if you aren't from western PA, it's a good read. 

I actually received this book as an Easter gift from my mom. She went to a local book signing by the author and knew I was interested in the Johnstown Flood. She got it signed for me as a gift. So, the book means a little more to me in that respect. 

I plan to read one of the following books next: The Leftovers by Tom Perrotta, The Stand by Stephen King, or The Walking Dead: Rise of the Governor by Robert Kirkman.


Virginia Do;

Virginia Do, Assistant to the Senior Director, University Center & Student Activities

I like to keep my summer reading light. So, what better to read than a young adult novel? I am currently reading The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, which is about Hazel, a 16-year-old cancer patient, and her friends from support group. They live by the mantra "living our best life today," which includes traveling to Europe, receiving chemotherapy treatments, and falling in love. What first drew me to TFIOS is I like to read books before they are released as movies so that I can see the movie come to life, and—hopefully—the filmmakers have the same picture as I had while I read.  

Of course, when you are talking about someone with cancer, there will be some inevitable tears somewhere in the story; so, be careful if you read this on the bus or next to a public pool. If you like a good tearjerker with lots of emotion, then you'll enjoy this quick read. The next step will be to rent this when it comes out on DVD so that I can save myself the indignity of crying in a movie theater full of teens.

Tags: Academic Support Center,Campus Life,Campus News,Housing & Dining Services,Office of Campus Life,Student Activities,University Center
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 1C7C9674-F9F1-0079-1EED3F600FDFD871
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 4E814B95-C4EE-4316-46EF4F64302E2D54
Title: Crisis in Iraq: Three Questions for Professor Benjamin Jensen
Author:
Subtitle:
Abstract: Scholar-in-Residence Benjamin Jensen, an expert on international security, explains the situation in Iraq and outlines next steps.
Topic: International
Publication Date: 07/10/2014
Content:

Almost three years after the end of the Iraq war, Iraq is again in crisis. Its government has lost control of large parts of the country; sectarian violence is on the rise, and jihadism is resurgent. Scholar-in-Residence Benjamin Jensen, an expert on international security, explains the situation in Iraq and outlines next steps.

Q: A Sunni militant offensive has overrun large parts of northern Iraq. What are the goals of the group that now calls itself "Islamic State" and its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi? 

A: The group appears intent on establishing a Caliphate in the heart of the Middle East. From this stronghold they will spread their ideology across the region. It is a revolutionary regime intent on changing the political boundaries and regimes of the greater Middle East. Reports are starting to emerge that the group is seizing materials linked to weapons of mass destruction, including uranium used for academic research from the University of Mosul and for former chemical weapons factories. While the group is highly unlikely to build either a chemical or a nuclear device in the near-term, the seizures signal that the Islamic State is either intent on establishing a strategic deterrent or sponsoring large-scale terror attacks. They are risk takers and we have likely not seen their last gamble. 

Q: The crisis has put pressure on Iraqi leader Nuri al-Maliki as he seeks a third term as prime minister. What should be done to resolve the political crisis and improve Sunni-Shiite relations?  

A: Al-Maliki is as responsible for the current political and security crisis as the Islamic State. Rather than ruling Iraq as an inclusive regime for all Iraqis, he has systematically alienated moderate Sunnis, Shiites, and Kurds. His regime has crowded out moderates and created a climate ripe for extremism and sectarian civil war. It is unlikely the crisis will be resolved as long as he is prime minister. The question is who replaces him and how Iraqis can do it in a manner that doesn’t undermine their legitimacy of their governing institutions. 

Q: Iraq has received support -- including equipment, intelligence and advisers -- from the United States, Russia, and Iran to battle the militant offensive. What role should the United States play in this conflict? 

A: U.S. security architecture in the Middle East has evolved since the end of World War II from experiments with collective defense arrangements to playing the role of the external guarantor of regional stability (i.e., securing trade routes for the flow of oil to Europe and Asia, protecting favorable regimes, and ensuring no single state like Iran dominates the region) and seeking to transform the region through democracy promotion and economic reform. Major events tend to alter strategy. For example, the Iranian Revolution in 1979 led to the end of the Central Treaty Organization, an attempt to have a NATO for the Middle East. The sectarian struggle currently gripping the Middle East is likely another moment to pause and reconsider the larger security architecture in the region. Before taking any action in Iraq, the United States needs a clear strategy for the region that connects issues from Syria to Iranian nuclear proliferation. No American official has articulated anything resembling a comprehensive strategy for the region at present. Acting in the absence of an overarching strategic logic translated into clear, feasible policy goals is a recipe for disaster. 

Follow Dr. Jensen on Twitter at @BenjamJensen. To arrange an interview, call 202-885-5943.

Tags: School of International Service
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 4EE9C8DC-FA62-77BF-364009B015B8BC9B
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: 44AA8085-C9F1-155A-5EA177F9E1AC9EF3
Title: Fulbright Internship Grant is First of Its Kind for AU
Author: Laura Herring
Subtitle:
Abstract: Ana-Cecilia Alvarez, BSBA ’11, will build her skills in international financial services on a unique type of Fulbright grant to Mexico City.
Topic: Business
Publication Date: 07/10/2014
Content:

It's no wonder Ana-Cecilia Alvarez, BSBA '11, has always been drawn to international business exploration. Raised by a Spanish father and an American mother, she grew up living in both the U.S. and Madrid, Spain.

Now Alvarez—Ceci to her friends—will be putting that interest to use through a ten-month Fulbright Binational Business Internship grant in Mexico City, beginning in August. According to the AU Office of Merit Awards, Alvarez is the first student from the university to receive this particular grant and is one of just twelve U.S. grantees selected for the program this year.

Fulbright as Fusion

Unlike traditional Fulbright scholarships, where scholars typically teach English in a foreign country or pursue an independent research project, those in the Binational Business Internship program work for Mexican companies and nonprofits in the financial services sector.

"The middle class in Mexico is growing at an unprecedented pace," Alvarez said. "There's a new generation of people who need financial services and education, and I can't wait to be a part of that."

To Alvarez, the Fulbright internship is an opportunity to combine her previous work histories at the United Nations Foundation and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to enter into the international financial services sector.

"I've gone down the nonprofit path and the government oversight path and have seen each have their limitations," she said. "While both types of organizations often have the same goal, one is usually limited by funding and the other by bureaucratic processes. I think there is a better way to serve consumers directly."

And that way, she thinks, is to offer better financial tools that can be easily understood and used by consumers.

Knowledge is Power  

Alvarez's desire to empower individuals dates back to the Washington Initiative course she took at Kogod. For the course, students partner with local nonprofit D.C. Earned Income Tax Credit Campaign to help low-income tax filers.

"A lot of the people I met during that program had financial hardships, faced discrimination, and had a long history of being taken advantage of, especially Spanish-speaking immigrants," Alvarez recalled. "They just wanted to pay their taxes and feel productive; they just needed a little help and guidance."

Since that course, Alvarez has continued to volunteer as a filing assistant for Spanish speakers.

"Right now, I would say, my career goal is to better serve Hispanic consumers by offering innovative products, including financial planning and services in the marketplace," she said. "I believe the Fulbright in Mexico will allow me to both contribute my knowledge and further learn about this exciting industry."

Tags: Alumni,Career Center,Kogod School of Business,Office of Merit Awards,Featured News
Publication:
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: 44E3F882-E8C4-681A-7FC1248191D5D0BD
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
newsId: AFE106BD-00F3-B213-788E52E38F9981B1
Title: Creating a Global Small Business Social Network
Author: Karli Kloss
Subtitle:
Abstract: Carlota Pico, SIS-SOC / BA ’08, co-founder of the first free B2B social network, BeConnections.
Topic: Alumni
Publication Date: 07/09/2014
Content:

Carlota Pico, SIS-SOC/BA ’08, is co-founder of BeConnections, the first free social network for companies, described by Spanish newspaper EL MUNDO as the “Facebook for businesses.” BeConnections is designed to connect small and medium enterprises (SMEs) internationally, and to give them a common platform to keep in touch and promote their activities to a global audience. The idea for this platform was born out of the years Carlota spent working abroad and connecting with SMEs all over the world - and witnessing the challenges they face when looking to enter new markets.

Before launching her company, Carlota was an investment reporter working in Africa, the Middle East, and Central Asia. Through her interviews and field research, she strived to positively represent these regions to international investors looking for opportunities in emerging markets. Her experiences as a reporter brought her into contact with a variety of small businesses and local entrepreneurs.

Following her time as a reporter, she backpacked across the globe and eventually settled in Madrid, Spain where she co-founded BeConnections. “AU helped me to understand other cultures from perspectives that are often not exposed on the news,” she says. “In turn, this triggered a curiosity that has led me to travel the world and to make new connections in places that I would have never thought of doing business before.”

The mission of BeConnections is to help companies keep their business networks organized on a single platform. It is the first free, global business to business social network without size, region, or industry limits, which allows companies to connect with each other according to their interests and maintain that contact over time. Looking forward, she hopes that BeConnections can provide members with a way to explore non-traditional markets and create new partnerships that might otherwise have been difficult to maintain.

BeConnections is currently focused on creating synergies specifically between emerging and Western markets. Carlota was recently invited by the government of Algeria to give a presentation about BeConnections at their international trade fair. Her next stops include Dubai and then Dublin, where BeConnections has been selected to be part of The Summit’s Alpha Program, Europe’s largest technology conference.

“My advice to AU students today is [to] learn from the university’s rich diversity of people, personalities, and perspectives,” she says. “Embrace globalization both on campus and beyond.”

Tags: Alumni Update,School of International Service
Publication: DC9BFA6D-C400-714B-030527285D7B0492
Photos: 0
Contact Name:
Contact Phone:
Contact Email:
News Photos: B09F9615-D85E-96FF-E89A46AF7ADD5E0C
Profile:
Media:
newMediaIDList:
 
newsId: A775946C-BE26-99F8-F3BCFAFAB8B5203E
Title: Juggling NBC, SOC All in A Day’s Work for Grad Student
Author: Adrienne Frank
Subtitle:
Abstract: Aspiring filmmaker juggles classes, career.
Topic: Student
Publication Date: 06/03/2009
Content:

Joe Bohannon grew up on environmental films.

“I would travel from Antarctica to outer space – all from my seat in the theater. I would get woozy from the aerial shots, but I also fell in love with film and filmmaking,” he recalls.

Now, as a grad student in the School of Communication (SOC), Bohannon, 41, is making his childhood dream a reality.

“This is the next chapter in my career evolution and my personal journey,” said the MFA student.

Bohannon works as an operations manager and producer for NBC News in Washington – a gig that not only informs his work in the classroom, but allows him the flexibility to juggle classes and extracurricular activities.

“I wanted to continue to work while I learned,” said Bohannon, who’s been with the network since 1993, covering everything from the Emmys to the White House. “I wanted to learn the theory, while still refining my skills. You can always learn how to light things or do audio a little better.”

The Fairfax, Va., resident has also honed his skills through SOC’s Center for Environmental Filmmaking (CEF). Along with CEF director Chris Palmer, Bohannon has shot a documentary on the Chesapeake River for Maryland Public TV; mingled with alligators in the Florida Everglades; and shot atop glaciers in the Alaskan wilderness.

“I experienced things I never would’ve imagined – things I couldn’t have learned just sitting in a classroom,” says Bohannon, who also traveled to five states to help a classmate shoot a documentary about parrots, A Place to Land. He served as director of cinematography and sound technician on the film, which won a Student Academy Award.

And while he says it’s tricky to juggle school and work – “it’s difficult to wear so many hats when you’re just one person” – Bohannon wouldn’t trade the experience for anything.

“Being able to go to untouched areas of the world to practice your craft is just amazing.”

Tags: Students,School of Communication,Center for Environmental Filmmaking,Film and Media Arts,American Today
Suggested Home Page:
Profile:
Photos: 0
Success Story Photos: A77818DC-DA12-3E1C-EFFF6DE02502F78C
Media:
newsId: AA1092CC-B2AC-A672-86893E068F4707D1
Title: When Eagles beat the mighty Hoyas
Author: Mike Unger
Subtitle:
Abstract: Before he become an NBA coach, Ed Tapscott led the Eagles to a historic win over the Hoyas.
Topic: Alumni Profile
Publication Date: 02/24/2009
Content:

Before he was one of the 30 coaches at the pinnacle of professional basketball, Ed Tapscott '80 led AU to one of its biggest basketball wins.  

Tapscott, now  head coach of the NBA's Washington Wizards, was on the sideline 26 years ago when his unheralded Eagles shocked the college basketball world by taking down the mighty Georgetown Hoyas.  

Despite coming off back-to-back 20-win seasons, AU was a prohibitive underdog to a Georgetown team ranked fifth in the nation and stocked with future NBA all-stars. Those Hoyas teams didn't just beat their opponents, they scared them into submission. But AU refused to be intimidated.  

"We knew we could play with them," says Gordon Austin, who scored some huge buckets for AU that night. "Coach Tapscott treated it like it was a normal game. He made the point to respect them, but not to fear them. We started off playing very well, and they were not. They were playing right into our hands, shooting long jumpers—and we were getting all the rebounds."  

AU took a double-digit lead into the locker room, but Georgetown mounted an expected second-half comeback that AU scrambled to hold off. When the final buzzer sounded, the scoreboard read American 62, Georgetown 61. 

 "I was happy to see that clock wind down to zero, that's for sure," says Tapscott, who went on to a long and distinguished career as an NBA executive before taking over the Wizards head coaching job earlier this season. "It was a wonderful moment for our program. I think it gave us some sense of appreciation at AU that basketball could play a significant role on campus."

Tags: Alumni,American Today,Athletics,Washington DC
Suggested Home Page:
Profile:
Photos: 0
Success Story Photos: AA3428F7-B7C5-AB49-0F0AF9AEB2475707
Media:
newsId: 904CB299-B701-6AFB-82BEFC5174731C76
Title: Marine ghostbusters
Author: Sally Acharya
Subtitle:
Abstract: Biology professor provides solutions for marine debris.
Topic: Research
Publication Date: 02/19/2009
Content:

This is a ghost story that starts with a fishing net that gets loose from its moorings. It drifts in the ocean, entangling sea turtles, trapping seals, snagging fish that act as bait to lure other fish, which are trapped in their turn. Or maybe it damages a fragile coral reef.

Fortunately, that's not the end of the story. Science has its ghostbusters, and they're in pursuit of these derelict nets known as ghost nets, along with the wildlife-killing garbage dumped at sea by freighters and fishing fleets.

The ghostbusters are people like marine biologist and AU environmental science professor Kiho Kim, who goes after marine debris as a member of the Ocean Studies Board of the National Research Council. Their weapons are data, meetings, long hours analyzing research, and ultimately, a national report and testimony to Congress on the changes needed in marine policy and regulations.

The sight of marine debris is familiar to Kim, who spots it whenever he dives around the coral reefs that are the focus of his research. "Every time I go diving, I come back up with a pocket full of weights and lines," he says.

Some of it washes into the sea. A plastic bottle chucked into a clump of water weeds by a Georgetown fisherman can end up in a sea turtle's belly. "Plastic can lacerate intestines. Animals can choke, or their intestines can be blocked up so they can't eat any more," Kim says.

On weekend cleanups at a seemingly pristine Georgetown park he's led AU students to do what they can, in practical ways, to stop trash on the shoreline from washing into the seas.

 But the debris problem, particularly in the ocean, is too big to eliminate with weekend actions. That's why Kim and his colleagues have spent almost two years examining the situation and, in the end, proposing specific solutions.

The National Research Council is, in essence, the research arm of the federal government. Its Ocean Studies Board includes experts in a variety of areas, such as lawyers who looked at regulations, along with some leading marine biologists—including Kim.

The council's report called for the United States and the international maritime community to adopt a goal of zero discharge of waste, a goal that could be closer to reality thanks to a series of policy and regulation changes recommended by Kim and his colleagues.

And that could make a real impact in saving the seas from the specter of wildlife-killing debris.

Adapted from the article "Report to Congress: Tackling Marine Debris," American magazine, Winter/December 2008.

Tags: Faculty,American Today,Science,Biology,Research,Environment
Suggested Home Page:
Profile:
Photos: 0
Success Story Photos:
Media:
newsId: 90250D3F-F30A-9C1A-890D7ADAF416E8A8
Title: Saving the Dead Sea in Israel
Author:
Subtitle:
Abstract: Gidon Bromberg is restoring an ecosystem with Jews, Christians, and Muslims.
Topic: International
Publication Date: 02/19/2009
Content:

 The Dead Sea is dying.

With each passing year the sea's depth drops by 1.2 meters, almost 4 feet, yet Gidon Bromberg refuses to consider its demise inevitable. His goal: the ecosystem will be restored, and it will be done by Jews, Christians, and Muslims working in concert.

In a part of the world with no shortage of problems, the environment often takes a back seat. It has a champion, however, in Bromberg, WCL/LLM '94. Working from a blueprint he developed at AU, he has devoted his life to restoring the Jordan River valley.

"There is no place on the planet similar to the Dead Sea," Bromberg says from his office in Tel Aviv, Israel, where he runs the organization EcoPeace. Stunningly beautiful, the Jordan valley has desert, mountains, green oases, and a heritage 12,000 years old. "For all three religions the river has a high importance, and yet we've completely destroyed it."

The sea's main water source is the Jordan River, today in a great state of peril. Littered with sewage, agricultural runoff, and pilfered of its water primarily for use in farming by Israel, Jordan, and Syria, the river's diversion is directly responsible for 70 percent of the Dead Sea's water level decline. The rest stems from mineral mining.

The Dead Sea was 80 kilometers long a half-century ago, about 50 miles. Today, it's only 31 miles long and shrinking fast.

Bromberg's Washington College of Law thesis on the environmental implications of the Middle East peace process intrigued many people around Washington, leading to a conference on the topic in Egypt and the founding of EcoPeace.

Today, its 38 staff members and hundreds of volunteers work in offices in Tel Aviv, Bethlehem in the Palestinian West Bank, and Amman, Jordan, lobbying governments to adopt environmentally favorable policies and trying to stimulate public awareness of the ecosystems at the grassroots level.

"He's committed to bringing Palestinians, Jordanians, and Israelis together to see how they can cooperate," says Nader Al-Khateeb, EcoPeace's Palestinian director. "He's a citizen of this region and cares for its future."

Like the obstacles to peace, the prospects of rejuvenating the Jordan River and the Dead Sea are daunting, yet Bromberg is convinced both can be achieved.

"The environment is a great impetus for peace building," he says. "What we do in our work is turn things around and look at how we could all benefit if we cooperate."

Adapted from the article "Saving the Dead Sea," American magazine, spring 2007.

Tags: Alumni,American Today,Middle East,Global,Law
Suggested Home Page:
Profile:
Photos: 0
Success Story Photos: AF8BFD34-C126-0784-E214DBB642ED948A
Media: