Community-Based Learning Courses

Fall 2013

Each of the courses listed below includes a community-based learning component enabling students to directly connect the theories explored in class to a project or direct service with a community partner.

Undergraduate:                                                      

 Civil Rights in the US

AMST-320.002/HIST-396.002
E.Edelman
TH, 5:30PM 8:00PM
In this course students explore activist and civil rights movements in the United States, analyzing both the political and social actors articulating these movements, as well as the particular tactics and strategies mobilized by different communities and groups. Students consider how movements across the country and world play out in the contexts of their own lives. Focus on particular themes or movements including race/ethnicity; sexuality; immigration/nationalism; war/conflict; and class/Neoliberalism examines the various movements and actions that have mobilized around these concerns, such as the Civil Rights Movement, LGBT rights, the Minuteman Civil Defense Corp, squatters/occupiers, and so forth.

Visual Literacy

COMM-105.001
W, 8:55AM 11:35AM
M, 5:30AM 8:00PM
K. Brannon-W, 2:35PM 5:15PM
M, 2:35AM 5:15PM
T, 2:35PM 5:15PM
TH, 11:45AM 2:25PM
T, 8:55AM 11:35AM
S. Menke-Fish-W, 8:55AM 11:35AM
This course introduces students to ways of understanding visual images in a variety of contexts, including art, photography, film, and performing arts. Students learn about aesthetics, as well as the production aspects of visual images; discover intuitive dimensions of seeing; and analyze the influence of culture on visual symbols and communication. Students complete a final group consulting project for a community partner.

Public Relations Portfolio                          

COMM-437.001
G. Puglisi
T, 5:30PM 8:00PM
This course implements the skills, techniques, and strategies learned in previous public relations classes by giving students the opportunity to work with a real-world client. Specific deliverables are met that may include social media campaigns, events, product launches, public service announcements, websites, news releases, and media relations campaigns for clients who may be nonprofits, established organizations, and global entities. Prerequisite: COMM-337, COMM-346, COMM-380, public communication major, and minimum 2.5 GPA.

Community Documentary

COMM-528.001/ANTH-544.003
N. Shapiro-Perl
T, 2:35PM 5:15PM
Using new media tools, students learn the methods and production of a four-minute autobiographical digital story, first by creating their own and then assisting community members. These first-person video narratives can be used in public meetings, on websites, etc. to build and mobilize communities, and empower the storytellers themselves.

Service-Learning in Teacher Education

EDU-492.001
J. Boyd
T, 2:35PM 3:25PM
Students participate in school and community organizations and agencies. Exploration of the principles of service-learning and application of classroom theory in the community. Special attention is paid to providing equitable learning environments. Students must complete a minimum of 40 hours in the community placement and attend three on-campus seminars. May be repeated for credit.

Washington Initiative

KSB-252.001/ KSB-252.002
A. Holcomb
W, 9:30AM 11:10AM
This course provides undergraduate business students with experience through the coordination of an event or service for a nonprofit agency. Through these interactions, students apply a variety of academic business skills while contributing to the local community and learning about nonprofit management. May be repeated for credit.

Marketing for Social Change                            

MKTG-551.001
S. Grier
T, 5:30PM 8:00PM
This course develops the knowledge, skills, and perspectives to apply fundamental marketing concepts (e.g. customer orientation, segmentation, and positioning) to create beneficial changes in society. Designed for students whose career goals involve working in or with organizations who desire to promote social change, or who are interested in understanding the role and application of marketing beyond commercial gain.

Community Psychology                                         

PSYC-345.001
N. Enchautegui-de-Jesus
TF, 10:20AM 11:35PM
This course introduces the principles, approaches, and guiding concepts of community psychology, including attention to diversity, action research, prevention, and citizen participation. Community psychology seeks to understand the interrelationship between individual well-being and multiple ecological levels of influence, from families and neighborhoods, to economic conditions and mass media. Community psychologists study these relationships to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that address pressing problems in our society, including youth violence, HIV/AIDS, and educational disparities. Students apply and expand their learning of key concepts through service in community-based organizations. Prerequisite: one introductory and two additional psychology courses.

 Graduate:              

Community Documentary

COMM-528.001/ANTH-544.003
N. Shapiro-Perl
T, 2:35PM 5:15PM
Using new media tools, students learn the methods and production of a four-minute autobiographical digital story, first by creating their own and then assisting community members. These first-person video narratives can be used in public meetings, on websites, etc. to build and mobilize communities, and empower the storytellers themselves.

Oral History

HIST-667.001
D. Kerr
TH, 5:30PM 8:00PM
This course presents the theory, practice, legal and ethical issues, and uses of oral history. Through field work, students gain interviewing, transcription, and analysis skills and studies the advantages and limitations of oral history as source material. Reading and case histories are drawn from modern U.S. history.

Nonprofit Resource Development

PUAD-682.001
L. Faulk
M, 8:10PM 10:40PM
Nonprofit organizations support themselves through many different sources, including charitable gifts and grants, government grants and contracts, earned income from fees, memberships and sponsorships, returns on investments, volunteer labor, gifts-in-kind, and other sources. They also mix these sources of income in many different ways. This course illuminates the theoretical rationales and practical considerations involved in developing and utilizing particular sources of income and in selecting appropriate combinations or portfolios, so that nonprofit organizations can effectively advance their particular missions, sustain the infrastructure of their organizations, remain financially healthy, and manage risk, change and growth.

 

Current Classes

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Current Classes


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