Community-Based Learning Courses

Spring 2013

 

Undergraduate:                                 

Poverty & Culture

AMST-240.001    
B. McNeil
TF, 10:20AM-11:35AM

Students explore theories about the causes and consequences of poverty. Why poverty occurs, why certain people are poor, how poverty influences family and community life, and how the poor respond to their situation and try to change it. Students complete 10 hours of service.

Latino Community in the Washington D.C., Metropolitan Area      

AMST-340.001 / GOVT-423.002
M. Campos
M, 5:30PM-8:00PM

This interdisciplinary course explores the growing Latino community of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area and its challenges and contributions in a historical context. In addition to classroom experiences, the course uses local community-based organizations as a key resource. Students learn about issues such as immigration and legal rights, affordable housing and gentrification, education, youth gangs, health, employment and day laborers, and other concerns at the forefront of local and national Latino life. Students complete 20 hours of service with a nonprofit organization working with the Latino community.

Mapping Washington D.C. Geographies     

AMST-340.002    
E. Edelman
W, 5:30PM-8:00PM

In this course students reconsider how Washington, D.C., as a city inhabited and traversed by various types of communities and persons, can be visualized and understood in radically different ways. Specifically, the course attends to issues of human geography and mapping through issues of space and place, belonging, gentrification, race, class, gender, and sexuality. The class explores these elements through discussions and films, guest speakers, off-campus explorations of D.C., and primary data collection through interviews and personal map production.

Documentary Storytelling for Social Change            

ANTH-564.001 / COMM-564.001  
N. Shapiro-Perl
T,  2:35PM-5:15PM   

Teams of anthropology and communication students produce media projects of direct use to non-profit, community, labor, and social justice organizations. Projects capture the narratives of under-represented people in their own words, using cameras and other digital media, to address pressing issues of health, labor, sexuality, the environment, housing, education, and hunger. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Service-Learning in Teacher Education

EDU-492.001  
F. Jacobs 
T, 2:35PM-3:50PM

Students participate in school and community organizations and agencies. Exploration of the principles of service-learning and application of classroom theory in the community. Special attention is paid to providing equitable learning environments. Students must complete a minimum of 40 hours in the community placement and attend three on-campus seminars. May be repeated for credit.


Issues in Women's Health          
HFIT-323   
A. Richardson
T, 11:45AM-2:25PM

Provides basic understanding of gynecologic anatomy and physiology as well as female health conditions. Emphasis placed on current health research areas such as female cancers, menopause, infertility, lesbian health, minority health, sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy, and sexual dysfunctions. Students develop a personal health plan based upon an extensive family history and personal lifestyle. Students complete 20 hours of service.

Washington Initiative   

KSB-252       
A. Holcomb
Days and Times vary according to student schedule

The Washington Initiative is a two (2) credit pass/fail course that is open to Kogod School of Business undergraduate students with at least 30 credits and a grade of B or higher in ACCT-240. The course provides students with practical experience in interviewing and tax preparation through Community Tax Aid (CTA), a nonprofit organization that provides free income tax preparation services to low-income individuals and families, and the DC Earned Income Tax Credit Campaign (DCEITC)

Consulting and Project Management          

MGMT-484      
D. Issi
M, 8:10PM-10:40PM

This course provides critical skills for consulting and project management in business, government, and other organizations. It covers all dimensions of successful management consulting projects, developing and managing client relationships, project definition, building a project team, planning, analytical tools and risk analysis, project politics and communication, and managing ongoing projects. Prerequisite: MGMT-353.

Local and Community History

HIST-468
D. Kerr
Th, 11:45AM 2:45PM

This course explores the methods of doing collaborative community history. Students work with several organized groups of unhoused people to produce histories that are useful and relevant for them. The course relies heavily on group work. Students organize community workshops, conduct oral histories, work with historic maps, and dig in local and regional archives. Meets with HIST-668 001.

College Writing Seminar

LIT-101.012
A. Choutka
MTh, 8:55AM 10:10PM

Continues the work begun in LIT-100, stressing the student's abilities to construct extended arguments, to synthesize diverse materials, and to pursue library research. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: LIT-100 or equivalent. Note: Completion of LIT-100 and LIT-101 with grades of C or better fulfills the university College Writing and English Competency Requirement.

Visual Literacy

COMM-105.001-005
A. Arnold—W, 08:55AM 11:35AM
R. Razek—R, 11:45AM 02:35PM  
K. Williams—T, 05:30PM 08:00PM
S. Bahl—M, 11:45AM 02:25PM
B. Sunderland—M, 02:35PM 05:15PM

This course introduces students to ways of understanding visual images in a variety of contexts, including art, photography, film, and performing arts. Students learn about aesthetics, as well as the production aspects of visual images; discover intuitive dimensions of seeing; and analyze the influence of culture on visual symbols and communication. Students complete a final group consulting project for a community partner.

Graduate:                                  

Documentary Storytelling for Social Change            

ANTH-564.001 / COMM-564.001  
N. Shapiro-Perl
T,  2:35PM-5:15PM   

Teams of anthropology and communication students produce media projects of direct use to non-profit, community, labor, and social justice organizations. Projects capture the narratives of under-represented people in their own words, using cameras and other digital media, to address pressing issues of health, labor, sexuality, the environment, housing, education, and hunger. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Managing Nonprofit Organizations   

PUAD-681.001    
L. Faulk
M,  8:10PM-11:40PM

This course looks at the application of management theories and practices in nonprofit organizations. Establishment and sustainability of nonprofit organizations, strategic management principles, organizational structures and processes, multiple funding sources and their impact on budget decisions, staff/board relationships, human resource practices, use of volunteers, accountability systems, and methods for determining organizational effectiveness.

Program Evaluation         

SIS-635.005     
C. Collins
W, 2:35PM-5:15PM

This course helps students develop a thorough understanding of qualitative and basic quantitative tools and approaches to international program evaluation. With needs, priorities, and agendas contested across political scales and economic sectors, evaluation is not only a technically demanding exercise; it is an intensely political process. Students develop skills in understanding methodological as well as epistemological and ontological underpinnings of program evaluation and how these influence research design and data interpretation; designing research for evaluative purposes and critically assessing its validity, reliability, efficiency, and effectiveness; reading and coding data, developing report outlines, and presenting findings in appropriate formats. In addition to skill development, the course also challenges students in their roles as development practitioners to identify ethical dilemmas in the context of evaluation and to reflect on appropriate responses. The course includes brief lectures, in-class exercises, problem sets, a real world case study, and discussion in groups and plenary.

Local and Community History

HIST-668
D. Kerr
Th, 11:45AM 2:45PM

This course explores the methods of doing collaborative community history. Students work with several organized groups of unhoused people to produce histories that are useful and relevant for them. The course relies heavily on group work. Students organize community workshops, conduct oral histories, work with historic maps, and dig in local and regional archives. Meets with HIST-468 001.



18K Hours of Service

In the 2011-2012 academic year, 18,129 hours of service were completed through community-based learning classes on direct service and class based projects.

802 Students

In the 2011-2012 academic year, 802 students participated in community-based work, connecting their course work with identified community needs.

56 Community Partners

In the 2011-2012 academic year, AU community-based learning students partnered with 56 different DC area nonprofit organizations and schools.