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Mentoring for Graduate Students

Why Mentoring?

Mentoring is a way for students to connect with faculty and peers. Mentors help students prepare for their next steps in academia and beyond.

General Academic Mentoring Resources

The most common interpretation of a mentorship role involves academic advising.

Resources

How to Get the Mentoring You Want (for students) - University of Michigan Rackham School of Graduate Studies

How to Mentor Graduate Students (for faculty) - University of Michigan Rackham School of Graduate Studies

The Multifaceted Roles of the Graduate Mentor - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Receiving Feedback: What Students Want (and Need) - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Resources for Handling Diversity

University campuses are diverse. It's important for both students and mentors to be aware of differences in race, gender, sexual orientation, age, socioeconomic background, career goals, or any other facet of life that might affect a mentoring relationship.

Resources

Mentoring Needs in a Diverse Community (for students and mentors) - University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Graduate Mentoring Guidebook

Mentoring Issues for Underrepresented Students - University of Michigan Rackham School of Graduate Studies

Mentoring within a Diverse Community (for mentors) - University of Michigan Rackham School of Graduate Studies

Building a Supportive and Inclusive Environment (for mentors) - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Professional Mentoring Resources

A good mentor will positively affect a student's post-graduate life. Students should seek out mentors who can expand their knowledge of career options, widen their network within a field, and hone their leadership skills.

Resources

The Case for Graduate Professional Development - Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations

Professional Development Timeline - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Peer Mentoring Resources

Peer mentoring exists in various forms, depending on program duration and student needs. Consider peer mentorship for close guidance from another student.

Resources

Peer Mentoring Handbook - Washington University in St. Louis

CU EMPower: Peer Mentor & Protégé Handbook - Cornell University's Engineering Mentorship Partnership

Additional Reading

The Ideal PhD Mentor - A Student's Perspective - Science Magazine

Graduate Student Mentoring: A Survey of Doctoral Students - University of Massachusetts Amherst

When to Say Goodbye - The Mentoring Group

Guide on Writing Letters of Recommendation - Harvard University