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ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-350
Special Topics (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Cross-cultural comparison and analysis within selected culture areas. Rotating topics include human osteology, language and sexuality, student activism and social justice, and archaeology of the Chesapeake Bay region.

ANTH-350
001CB
ANTHROPOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Special Topics (3)

Environmental Anthropology

The seminar focuses on the anthropological study of the environment. Students are introduced to the persistent themes, key theories, and ethnographic practice of environmental anthropology and discuss how anthropologists have approached the study of the environment. Students read classic and contemporary works that explore themes of social nature, degradation and collapse, ethnoclimatology, the politics of indigenous and local knowledge, and the management of nature.

ANTH-350
002
ANTHROPOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Special Topics (3)

Human Osteology

This course provides students with basic understanding of the human skeleton through lectures, field trips, and hands-on experience. Students learn how to identify skeletal elements from whole and fragmentary pieces of bone, and how to construct a biological profile of skeletal individuals through estimations of age-at-death, sex, population ancestry, stature, and pathological conditions. Additionally, students are introduced to literature addressing theoretical and ethical issues pertaining to the study and analysis of human remains.

ANTH-350
001
ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Special Topics (3)

Biological Anthropology

This course provides a survey of biocultural research approaches used in studies of historic human skeletal samples and contemporary health and disease studies of living populations. Class readings, lectures, and discussions focus on the biological consequences of poverty and inequality. Osteology laboratories and field trips are used to enhance students' understanding of the relationship between socioeconomic status, differential access to resources, and biological well-being. Course materials illustrating the use of the race concept by nineteenth and twentieth century scientists and medical professionals provide historical context for the development of the biocultural synthesis.

ANTH-350
002
ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Special Topics (3)

Food and Ecology

Through eating, humans incorporate the environment into their own bodies. This course explores the connections between food and ecology through a cross-cultural, anthropological approach including a series of experiential assignments on these topics. Themes addressed include food desires and taboos; bodily ecologies; feasts and famine; making "good" food; and virtuous consumption. By the end of this class, students consider how our eating and purchasing habits relate to political and environmental factors, explore the importance of food to local and global ecologies, and develop an understanding of some ways that food is influenced and influences global and personal politics.