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ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-531
Topics in Archaeology (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include historical archaeology, artifact analysis, archaeology of the Chesapeake, archaeology of the Potomac Valley, Aztec, Inca, and Maya, and archaeology and politics.

ANTH-531
001
ANTHROPOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics in Archaeology (3)

Origins of Inequality

In this course students explore humanities rich past through the archaeological record. The present understanding of the human experience is shaped by contemporary social and political economic contexts. Thus, the goals in this course are two-fold: to learn how social and political complexity arose; and to assess how emergence of leadership and governance simultaneously created inequalities that are presently manifested in race, class, and gender dynamics.

ANTH-531
901
ANTHROPOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics in Archaeology (3)

Origins of Inequality

In this course students explore humanities rich past through the archaeological record. The present understanding of the human experience is shaped by contemporary social and political economic contexts. Thus the goals in this course are two-fold: to learn how social and political complexity arose; and to assess how emergence of leadership and governance simultaneously created inequalities that are presently manifested in race, class, and gender dynamics. Open only to Anthropology M.A. International Program students. Meets with ANTH-531 001.

ANTH-531
001
ANTHROPOLOGY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate/Graduate

Topics in Archaeology (3)

Archaeology of the Undocumented

This course explores how archaeology can be used to explore the lives of people across the past several hundred years who were largely excluded from written histories and documentation of their times: the homeless, maroons, enslaved laborers, some diasporans, beings from other species living among humans, and many others. Students explore the political and social nature of documentation as well as the ways archaeologists are creatively reconstructing what amount to lost lives and even societies as they seek knowledge of these unilluminated zones of modern history. The course also analyzes the relevance of these studies to present and future societies.