Office of the Registrar

Course Descriptions

To view course descriptions for all courses in a single subject:

  1. Select the subject from the drop-down list
  2. Click Get Descriptions

Searching course descriptions by keyword is currently unavailable.

Course: -

GOVERNMENT

GOVT-696
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

GOVT-696
001
GOVERNMENT
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Introduction to Research Design

This course teaches students a range of methods of inquiry and how to design their own research projects. It covers a basic introduction to the philosophy of science, the construction and testing of theories through observation and experiments, design and validity of research questions, causal inference, operationalization and measurement of variables, and case selection and sampling issues. It also introduces students to a range of qualitative methods, including ethnographic case studies, Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA), and archival and media research to complement the quantitative methods students learn in other courses. Students critique research and write and present a project meeting professional standards in the social sciences. Prerequisite: admission to Ph.D. program or permission of the director of doctoral programs.

GOVT-696
002
GOVERNMENT
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Campaign Finance

Money in politics is one of the most consistently controversial and compelling topics in American elections. Fundamental issues of free speech, government regulation and public participation in the democratic process are all central to campaign finance policy and law. This rigorous course explores campaign finance in federal elections and public policy. This course examines how American campaign finance policy has evolved, the intersection of policy and law, and considers how money and politics are important in campaigns and governing. Few other areas of American politics and law have evolved as substantially as campaign finance in recent years. This course provides a unique opportunity to learn about an area that is politically, practically, and academically essential to the democratic process. Meets with GOVT-496 002.

GOVT-696
E01L
GOVERNMENT
SUMMER 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Understanding Government in Africa through Novels,Film,Music

Throughout much of Sub Saharan Africa, governments are democratizing while addressing historical, political, and economic challenges that largely result from the legacy of colonialism. African authors, directors, and musicians have recorded these challenges in novels, films, and music from the continent. This online course focuses on these works of fiction, offering students the opportunity to study themes in governance and development from perspectives found in the continent's novels, films, and music. These themes include precolonial political structures; the political, social, economic, and cultural impacts of colonialism; resistance to colonialism; the modern state and economy; politics and reconciliation at the national and local levels; and democratic consolidation. The course compares novels, films, and music from West, Central, East, and Southern Africa, while exploring local perspectives on governance issues and also uses historical and political texts to supplement novels, film, and music. Meets with GOVT-432 E01L SIS-676 E01L.

GOVT-696
N02T
GOVERNMENT
SUMMER 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Native Nations, the Global Economy and the Future

This WINS program course builds on GOVT-436/636. The focus is on contemporary issues important to AI/AN/NH communities through a combination of lectures, discussions, relevant readings, research projects, field trips, volunteer work and guest speakers. At a challenging economic and political moment in America's history, the course addresses the role Native nations can play in the economic, social, and political future of the United States. Exploring various theories of development in Native communities, the course applies those theories to challenges and opportunities facing tribes and other Indigenous communities in the United States and around the world. The course engages students from an asset-based frame to see the strengths tribes offer to our nation and the world. Open only to students in the WINS program. Meets with GOVT-496 N02T.

GOVT-696
004
GOVERNMENT
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Communism and Capitalism in East Asia

This course focuses on the practice of communism and capitalism in East Asia, as well as its implications for the political and socioeconomic development in this region. More specifically, this course examines the major functions of political and economic systems, processes, and changes in East Asia (two systems of China, two systems of Korea, Japan, and Singapore). Major contemporary issues and policies of the East Asian systems are also surveyed, with particular emphasis on how each government enhances its regime's claim to political legitimacy. Meets with GOVT-432 003.