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HISTORY

HIST-305
Topics in Race and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include Latinos and Latinas in United States history; Native American history; and Asian American history.

HIST-305
002
HISTORY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Race and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

Black Popular Culture

Covering from slavery to the hip hop generation, this course critically examines the role of black popular culture (i.e., folklore, fashion, sports, theater, music, and film) in the African American freedom struggle. It places special emphasis on the analysis of race, class, gender, and political discourses.

HIST-305
001
HISTORY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Race and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

Slavery

This survey course focuses on the rise and demise of North American slavery within the context of the Atlantic world. The course explores what it meant to live in a slave society, for both the free and the unfree. Students read a variety of primary and secondary sources to understand the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children. Students also explore how the institution shaped American law, politics, empire, gender roles, and ideas about freedom. The course proceeds chronologically and examines the origins of plantation slavery in the colonial era, its expansion during the early Republic, the end of slavery with the civil war, and its historical legacy.

HIST-305
001
HISTORY
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics in Race and Ethnicity in the United States (3)

Race and Incarceration

This course examines the history of the American prison system, and focuses on the role of race and racism in shaping our nation's unique prison practices and its current incarceration crisis.