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HISTORY

HIST-396
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

HIST-396
001
HISTORY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Food, Media, and Culture

This course investigates the intersection of food, ideology, identity, and media in American history. Cookbooks, memoirs, magazines, radio and TV-shows as well as feature films have traditionally used food to discuss national, ethnic, and class identity, while simultaneously promoting norms on citizenship, gender, and sexuality. The sources discussed in the course reach from the first American cookbook in the late eighteenth century to food centered videogames in the twenty-first century. Meets with AMST-330 001.

HIST-396
002
HISTORY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

American Environmental History

The environment stands alongside politics and social forces as a crucial factor shaping American history from the formation of North America to the rise of the suburbia. This course explores how Americans have interacted with and reshaped the continent's ecosystems from the colonial era to the present. Meets with AMST-396 001.

HIST-396
001
HISTORY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

The Cold War and the Spy Novel

This course explores the history of the Cold War, introducing students not only to relevant historical documents, but also to spy novels and films to analyze the relationship between history, ideology, literature, and film. The course deconstructs the Cold War's most important ingredients -- smokescreens and stereotypes.

HIST-396
003
HISTORY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Africa through Foreign Eyes

This course explores African societies through accounts of outsiders' medieval travelers, 19th-century explorers, and more recently international journalists. Students examine to what extent these travel logs, commentaries, and graphic images allow us to gain meaningful insights into African cultures. Students thus understand how outsiders' views informed (mis)conceptions about Africa still prevalent today.

HIST-396
004
HISTORY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Nineteenth Century Culture: Couture, Cuisine and Citizenship

This course explores a diverse range of cultural phenomena in the nineteenth century United States including fashion and food as well as interior design, beauty practices, child rearing philosophies, travel, and more. All of these practices reflect major social and political issues prevalent in the nineteenth century, such as nation- and empire-building, immigration, and changing understandings of gender, race, and sexuality. Meets with AMST-320 001.

HIST-396
005
HISTORY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Women, Gender, Race - Early America

Centering the lives, voices, and experiences of various groups of women, this course explores the making and intersection of categories and hierarchies of difference, namely gender and race, from the early fifteenth through the mid nineteenth century in North America.

HIST-396
006
HISTORY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

The Viking World

The course of European history was changed forever when the Vikings began to take an interest in their neighbors. What began as a series of small but devastating raids in the late eighth century soon mushroomed into a mass movement of Scandinavians to Ireland, Britain, France, and beyond, permanently altering the landscapes of these kingdoms. To their victims they were heathen pirates who killed without regard for age, gender, or status. But the Vikings also impacted Europe in more positive ways, opening up long-distance trade routes and encouraging urban development, among other things. This course takes a broad view of the Viking world by considering the evidence for the Vikings themselves as well as their impact abroad. The course uses material evidence (i.e. archaeology) and primary sources to better understand Viking society and religion, technology, ways of warfare, and influence across time and space.