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HISTORY

HIST-396 Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

HIST-396 001
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: The Viking World
The course of European history was changed forever when the Vikings began to take an interest in their neighbors. What began as a series of small but devastating raids in the late eighth century soon mushroomed into a mass movement of Scandinavians to Ireland, Britain, France, and beyond, forever altering the landscapes of these kingdoms. To their victims they were heathen pirates who killed without regard for age, gender or status. But the Vikings also impacted Europe in more positive ways, opening up long-distance trade routes and encouraging urban development, among other things. This course takes a broad view of the Viking world by considering the evidence for the Vikings themselves as well as their impact abroad. We will use material evidence (i.e. archaeology) and primary sources to better understand Viking society and religion, technology, ways of warfare and influence across time and space.
HIST-396 004
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Victorian Culture
This course explores a diverse range of cultural phenomena in the nineteenth century United States, reflecting on how clothes, interior design, child rearing philosophies, nutritional advice, travel, and pets can shape society and politics. Exploring the every-day life of the Victorians, the course also reflects on broad social movements and problems in the nineteenth century, a time of nation and empire building, suffrage, immigration, and war. Besides giving students an insight into the cultural, material and every-day history of the nineteenth century, the course focuses on how to utilize primary and secondary sources, how to do research, present in public settings, conceive and organize research projects and how to design and write a research paper. Meets with AMST-320 001.
HIST-396 005
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: American Drug Wars
This seminar introduces students to the concept of the war on drugs--broadly interpreted--and surveys America's history with mild-altering substances and efforts to control or prohibit the same. America's battle with addiction has both greater longevity and importance than is generally appreciated. Beginning with the role of commodities like coffee, sugar, tobacco and alcohol in forging global trade routes and colonial empire, the course examines America's experience with drugs, alcohol, temperance movements, crime and law enforcement from the early republic into the twentieth century with the birth of the modern drug war. Students are presented with American social, cultural and political history "through the saloon door," and examine how taboos and attempts at prohibition have been historically contingent and how the issue of drug and alcohol use has often been the site of profound political and social conflicts, many with lasting implications. Meets with AMST-330 002.
HIST-396 006
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: The End of the Cold War
For almost fifty years, the world was largely defined by the Cold War's ideological and geographic terms. To the surprise of almost all observers, it ended without widespread destruction or loss of life. This course explores the end of the Cold War chronologically and thematically. The course begins by examining efforts at detente in the 1970s and ends with the fall of communism in Eastern Europe, the reunification of Germany, and the breakup of the Soviet Union. The assigned readings and class discussion helps students assess the causes and effects of the end of the Cold War as understood by participants at the time and current observers such as political scientists and historians. For example, students study the power of personality, examining the roles of United States President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Students also examine key developments such as ongoing arms control negotiations and the rise of the Polish trade union movement. In addition, during the semester students evaluate how culture, the economy, politics, human rights activism, Western ideas, and nationalism each contributed to the end of the Cold War. The objectives of this course are to promote critical, analytical thinking about Cold War history and to encourage students to think in an international context to develop their own interpretation of the evolution and significance of the end of the Cold War. In addition, the assignments are structured to strengthen students' oral and written communication skills, including those of persuasion, argumentation, and presentation. Meets with SISU-330 001.
HIST-396 001
Term: FALL 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: