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HISTORY

HIST-649
Topics in U.S. History (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include labor and workers, espionage and national security, radical tradition, political movements, science and technologies, film and history, and families and childhood. Some background in U.S. history is recommended. Meets with HIST-449.

HIST-649
002
HISTORY
SPRING 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. History (3)

American Capitalism

This course explores the historiography of American capitalism from the establishment of Atlantic empires, through the era of the industrial revolution and slave emancipation, and into post-industrial modernity. Great emphasis is placed on changing labor markets, managerial techniques, state institutions, and market cultures. Meets with HIST-449 002.

HIST-649
001
HISTORY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. History (3)

The Modern Presidency: FDR to Obama

The American presidency is the most powerful office in the world today. This course traces the history and development of the modern presidency from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Barack Obama. It takes a chronological approach, but also considers important themes in presidential history. Meets with HIST-449 001.

HIST-649
002
HISTORY
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Topics in U.S. History (3)

African Americans and the World

Exploring African American engagement with international politics and U.S. foreign relations, this course considers African Americans and the Haitian Revolution, the international abolitionist movement, black emigration, African American critiques of U.S. imperialism, Pan-Africanism, black communism, African American artists and entertainers in Europe, Africans Americans and Third World decolonization, Black Power in a global context, and the Anti-apartheid movement. Meets with HIST-449 002.