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UNIVERSITY HONORS

HNRS-301
Honors Colloquium in Natural and Mathematical Sciences (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: permission of University Honors program director.

HNRS-301
001H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Natural and Mathematical Sciences (3)

Stress, Coping, and Emotion

The course covers theories, research methods, and applications of stress and emotion research. Reading assignments and lectures address the nature of psychological stress, its relation to appraisals, coping, and emotion, and the specific methodological challenges of studying stress and emotion. Topics include models of emotion regulation and stress responses, stress and health, personality, gender, and culture. The class also discusses personal growth, depression, and clinical interventions.

HNRS-301
002H
UNIVERSITY HONORS
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Honors Colloquium in Natural and Mathematical Sciences (3)

Infinity, Game Theory, and Fractals

The twentieth century heralded amazing and interesting innovations in mathematics, such as game theory and fractal geometry. While these new areas have great ideas that would appeal to the general population, they have often been coupled with technicalities that have restricted their study. This course surveys some of the fascinating modern developments in mathematics, including the study of game theory, voting theory, infinity, dimension, and fractals. These are linked to current theory and practice in many fields, such as economics, philosophy, political science, and international relations. This course emphasizes concepts rather than computations. It encourages communicating mathematical ideas with sentences rather than equations and graphs. Students taking this course need to be comfortable with high school mathematics, but no knowledge of calculus is required.