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UNIVERSITY HONORS

HNRS-302 Honors Colloquium in Social Sciences (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Usually offered every term. Restriction: University Honors, AU Honors, or minimum 45 credits and 3.50 GPA.

HNRS-302 002H
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Psychology of Happiness
This course explores the nature of happiness, why people so often misunderstand what makes them happy, and whether steps can be taken to increase happiness. One view of happiness emphasizes cultivating our strengths. Given that, students discuss some human strengths. These include consciousness, forgiveness, compassion, relationship, love, and positive emotions such as gratitude, hope, and elevation. Students also examine some ways in which culture might shape our experience of and beliefs about the good life.
HNRS-302 004H
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Bioethical and Legal Dilemmas in Healthcare
This colloquium provides students with a basic understanding of the relationships between bioethics and the law, a grounding in the principles of bioethics, and an introduction to the key bioethics debates. Students learn about a range of legal and bioethical issues that confront healthcare providers and patients in a time of rapid technological change and about new ways of thinking about these issues. Students relate fundamental principles of bioethics to several clinical topics and public policy problems, including informed consent, diagnostic genetics, end-of-life care, advanced directives, the right to die and physician-assisted suicide. A major portion of the course is devoted to examining the evolution of bioethics decision-making in judicial contexts and where U.S. society is in the contemporary debate. Students look at recent bioethics issues that have stirred public controversy and have yet to be decided by the courts, and consider the role of bioethical issues in public policy making. The course is an excellent overview of contemporary issues relating to law and medicine and foundational for students considering careers in law, medicine, or other healthcare professions. Beyond the substance of the issues it presents, this course helps students to enhance their analytical thinking, public speaking ability, and skills in writing clearly and cogently. Open only to students in the University Honors Program, the AU Honors Program or to any student with at least 45 credits and a 3.50 cumulative GPA.
HNRS-302 005H
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Free Speech Inalienable Right and Crime
The right of freedom of expression is being put to vigorous use around the world, in the best and worst ways - especially online. In China, netizens meet on a bootleg version of Twitter and on Web forums, racing government censors who delete their posts. In France, cartoonists and others were massacred in January, for the content of their newspaper. On YouTube, female students' daily movements were tracked online by their classmates, along with scenarios for raping them. ISIS proudly posts videos of beheadings. In Russia, extremist bloggers call for another Holocaust. In Kenya, hate speech was broadcast via SMS blasts, leading to mass killings - but at the same time, Kenyans used SMS and the web to report and contain violence. This interdisciplinary course examines how speech contributes to democracy as well as to hatred and atrocities. The course studies international law and policy related to freedom of expression - with special reference to digital communications - together with cases like the ones mentioned above and the knotty questions they pose - such as how to let free speech flourish while inhibiting hate, terrorism and genocide. Open only to students in the University Honors Program, the AU Honors Program or to any student with at least 45 credits and a 3.50 cumulative GPA.
HNRS-302 006H
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: The American 1990s
This course looks at a decade defined by a remarkable variety of decisive moments and developments, including the emergence of the Internet and the World Wide Web and the spectacle of the impeachment of a U.S. president. The 1990s were further defined by spasms of domestic terrorism, by war and genocide, by a robust domestic economy in the decade's second half, and by innovations in cinema and popular culture. The course includes off campus research at the Library of Congress and 1990s-relevant exhibits at the Newseum. Open only to students in the University Honors Program, the AU Honors Program or to any student with at least 45 credits and a 3.50 cumulative GPA.
HNRS-302 007H
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: Who Killed JFK?
This colloquium is a full examination of the many continuing mysteries and the latest findings about the murder of President John F. Kennedy in the streets of Dallas more than 50 years ago. Questions of who was responsible and why are supplemented by a thorough look at the impact this tragic event has had on America's government and its citizens. Open only to students in the University Honors Program, the AU Honors Program or to any student with at least 45 credits and a 3.50 cumulative GPA.
HNRS-302 001
Term: FALL 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title:
HNRS-302 004
Term: FALL 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title:
HNRS-302 008HL
Term: SPRING 2016
Course Level: Undergraduate
Section Title: National Security Debates
Surveillance, enhanced interrogation, unmanned aerial vehicles--frequent news stories relate to national security issues. By the very nature of the topic and the need to protect certain types of information and disclosures from enemies, the debate that is played out in the national and international news media and blogs tends to focus on small parts of a larger program or policy. This tends to lead to a conflation of two lenses in analyzing policy or program choices: can the United States act in this way, and should the United States act in this way? This course focuses on current debates in national security and analyzes them from both of these perspectives. First, the class identifies and assesses whether the policy or law can be implemented by studying the national and international legal regime governing this action, and then assesses whether the policy or law should continue to be implemented in the way that it has. In doing these assessments, students become more informed consumers of news and media accounts of issues that are of intense concern for the foreseeable future in national and international policy. Open only to students in the University Honors Program, the AU Honors Program or to any student with at least 45 credits and a 3.50 cumulative GPA.