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JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY

JLC-496
Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic.

JLC-496
E01L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Torture in Counterterrorism

Throughout history, torture has been used for multiple purposes: as a mechanism within formal legal systems, as a tool to control the lower classes, and as a covert tactic that has survived even when its practice has been contested or outlawed. Today, most democratic countries have outlawed torture and outwardly condemn it. However, even "civilized" states that denounce torture widely practice it. This course discusses the history of torture and physical punishment, changes in the practice over time, and the problem of torture today. The course focuses on a range of issues relating to torture including: what constitutes torture, attitudes about torture, the efficacy of using torture, concerns about torture especially in the context of counterterrorism, and why torture persists despite arguments against it.

JLC-496
F01L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Terrorism in the 21st Century

Since September 11th, terrorism is been increasingly a focus for the public, academics, government, and policy makers. While terrorism has been used for millennia, the tactics and technologies of terrorism are constantly evolving. This course focuses specifically on terrorism around the world in the 21st century. Students discuss a range of issues relating to 21st century terrorism including: the impact of 9/11 on global terror, changing nature of terrorist organizations, shifting tactics and goals of terrorism, and the evolution of technologies of terror including both weaponry and the use of social media. Meets with JLC-696 F02L.

JLC-496
N01
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Prison: Is Orange New Black?

Students examine women, crime, and imprisonment as presented in popular media-in particular, the series, Orange is the New Black-in concert with an examination of the scholarly research on these topics. Meets with JLC-696 N01.

JLC-496
002
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Race Issues in Justice

Race and justice are inextricably linked. From institutionalized racism on both global and domestic scales to de facto and de jure segregation, profiling in criminal justice, and environmental justice, among other topics, this course explores racism in its varied forms through a justice lens, tying the historic to the present and how these two impactful concepts relate to public policy.

JLC-496
E02L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Crime Prevention

This course takes a holistic approach in examining the topic of crime prevention. It incorporates the implications of criminological theory and research for prevention policy (e.g., evidence-based prevention), and evaluates various actual prevention approaches used today. Meets with JLC-696 E03L.

JLC-496
E03L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Cinema and Social Justice

This course explores current themes associated with injustice and equitable treatment. Valuing diversity is a necessary component to any community to make the whole society strong. However social justice is defined (equal opportunity re: gender, sexuality, religion, race, socioeconomic, etc. issues), at the root as people sharing community resources to get an equal opportunity. This class uses both pop culture and classical films to further the discussion of selected topics.

JLC-496
F03L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Sex Offense Policies in U.S.

In the first half of this course, students explore the typology of sex offenders, including juvenile offenders, serial rapists, pedophiles, and female offenders. In the second half, the class shifts to exploring policy responses to sexual offending, including registration, residency restrictions, and chemical castration. Meets with JLC-696 F03L.

JLC-496
E04L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

The Language of Crime

This course explores the many fascinating applications of linguistics to criminal justice, including the analysis of confession statements, suicide notes, courtroom discourse, and identifying unknown speakers based on their language. Meets with JLC-696 E04L.

JLC-496
F04L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

14Th Amendment in Theory and Practice

The aim of this class is twofold: first, to gain a firm and broad doctrinal understanding of the due process and equal protection clauses; and second, to explore what these clauses mean in our society today. Students study the Amendment through case law, social science research, and case studies, as well as through individual reflection and class discussion. Meets with JLC-696 F04L.

JLC-496
E05L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Law and Literature

This course examines the portrayal of the law, its processes and lawyers in literary works over time. Students discuss the changing nature of these portrayals in the context of broader questions of justice in society since the 19th century, as well as the historical and sociological reasons underlying the changes. Readings for the course may include the following: Dostoyevsky - Crime and punishment; Dickens - Bleak House; Camus - The Stranger; Doctorow - The Book of Daniel. Students also read the work of legal theorists on natural law, positivism, realism and critical legal theory. This course provides students with the opportunity to engage in a multi-disciplinary approach to their studies in law and justice. Meets with JLC-696 E05L.

JLC-496
F05L
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

Girls and Gangs

Female participation in crime and violence has, for the most part, been ignored by social scientists, particularly with respect to girls' participation in gangs. Largely the attitude of social scientists dealing with criminality has been, "Add women and stir," implying that the same factors that explained male criminality were applicable to females. This course considers the history and theories behind girls in gangs by exploring the ethnographies and empirical studies conducted over time. Among the topics of interest are the differences between gangs based on race/ethnicity, gender and the composition of the gang - i.e., whether there are both male and female members or a females only gang which affects the roles girls have in the gang. Meets with JLC-696 F05L.

JLC-496
D01
JUSTICE, LAW AND CRIMINOLOGY
SUMMER 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics: Non-recurring (1-6)

International Justice and Responsibility

Two of the most important changes in ethics in recent years are the shift from theories of national justice to global justice and the shift from emphasis on rights to emphasis on responsibilities. This seminar is specifically designed for students interested in global justice and responsibility. It examines various accounts that have been put forth in recent years that purport to capture our individual and collective responsibilities to prevent and/or remedy various kinds of global injustices, with a special focus on violent human rights abuses. Meets with JLC-631 D01.