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LITERATURE

LIT-446
Advanced Studies in Film (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include film and literature, national cinema, film genres, major filmmakers, and independent filmmakers, with emphasis on research. Meets with LIT-646. Usually offered every year.

LIT-446
001
LITERATURE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Film (3)

Robots: Imagination, Fiction, and Reality

This course explores the meanings of robots as cultural figures, tracing their presence in popular culture, science fiction and film, and engaging contemporary research in robotics. Both imaginary and real, robots represent our understanding of futurity and innovation, but they also allow us to question the limits and definitions of humanity. The class studies the emergence of robots in literature, theater, and cinema, studies classic texts such as Metropolis and Blade Runner, traces the evolution of robots in film and television through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and expands the conversation to include the humanities, the arts, and the sciences. Meets with LIT-646 001.

LIT-446
001
LITERATURE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Film (3)

Alfred Hitchcock in Context

This course traces the development of Alfred Hitchcock's career from his early work in silent films in the 1920s to his last films in the 1960s. In addition to screenings of Hitchcock films and readings in the history, theory and aesthetics of cinema, the class discusses films that may have influenced or affected his work, including silent era dramas, expressionist films, examples of film noir and melodrama, B-movies, and thrillers. Meets with LIT-646 001.

LIT-446
002
LITERATURE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Film (3)

Television Studies

The post-World War II rise of television as a creative medium changed audiovisual expression significantly: nightly news, the sitcom, the variety show, the game show, and, most importantly, all in the comfort of your living room. Television clearly derives from film (the 1.25:1 aspect ratio of the original home screens obviously mimicked the Academy ratio popular in cinema of the time) and so does the study of the medium; but there are important differences (narrative, ideological and theoretical) that make television studies a unique concept to explore. This course approaches television from both a historical and critical perspective, addressing programming in the United States and abroad. The course centers on a single series used as a case study for the entire class, although additional historical episodes from other series are assigned. There is no screening scheduled for this class since, unlike cinema, television is at its core a home-based activity. Additionally, each student selects a different television series of their choice to do a full research project through the duration of the semester. Meets with LIT-646 002.