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LITERATURE

LIT-446
Advanced Studies in Film (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include film and literature, national cinema, film genres, major filmmakers, and independent filmmakers, with emphasis on research. Meets with LIT-646. Usually offered every year.

LIT-446
001
LITERATURE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Film (3)

Alfred Hitchcock in Context

This course traces the development of Alfred Hitchcock's career from his early work in silent films in the 1920s to his last films in the 1960s. In addition to screenings of Hitchcock films and readings in the history, theory and aesthetics of cinema, the class discusses films that may have influenced or affected his work, including silent era dramas, expressionist films, examples of film noir and melodrama, B-movies, and thrillers. Meets with LIT-646 001.

LIT-446
002
LITERATURE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Film (3)

Television Studies

The post-World War II rise of television as a creative medium changed audiovisual expression significantly: nightly news, the sitcom, the variety show, the game show, and, most importantly, all in the comfort of your living room. Television clearly derives from film (the 1.25:1 aspect ratio of the original home screens obviously mimicked the Academy ratio popular in cinema of the time) and so does the study of the medium; but there are important differences (narrative, ideological and theoretical) that make television studies a unique concept to explore. This course approaches television from both a historical and critical perspective, addressing programming in the United States and abroad. The course centers on a single series used as a case study for the entire class, although additional historical episodes from other series are assigned. There is no screening scheduled for this class since, unlike cinema, television is at its core a home-based activity. Additionally, each student selects a different television series of their choice to do a full research project through the duration of the semester. Meets with LIT-646 002.

LIT-446
001
LITERATURE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Film (3)

Apocalyptic Cinema

This course traces the fascination with end of the world narratives, as it is expressed in the disaster film genre but also in science fiction and other cinematic and literary traditions. Film use spectacular visual and narrative effects to present the premise of total annihilation, but in the process they also interrogate concepts of danger and heroism, community, nationalism, and globalization. The course focuses on the relationship between science fiction literature and film, the cultural impact of the disaster genre in the 20th and 21st centuries, and major directors and works in this mode. Meets with LIT-646 001.

LIT-446
002
LITERATURE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Advanced Studies in Film (3)

Contemporary Latin American Cinema

Using methods that both embrace and critique the study of national cinemas, this course provides a survey of cinema from across the Latin American region. After a brief discussion of general film terminology and ideas, the course explores a quick history of cinema from Spanish and Portuguese America (including the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema) and the New Latin American Cinema before concentrating on the changing tropes of contemporary cinema from the region, including screenings as part of the AFI Latin American Film Festival. Course taught entirely in Spanish. Meets with LIT-646 002 and SPAN-456/656 001.