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LITERATURE

LIT-637
Advanced Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. In seventeenth and eighteenth century Britain new literary forms, such as the novel and the autobiography, responded to the far-reaching changes in philosophy, politics, and religion of the Restoration and Enlightenment. Rotating topics include Milton, Restoration drama, and the rise of the British novel, with emphasis on research. Meets with LIT-437. Usually offered every year.

LIT-637
001
LITERATURE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature (3)

The Eighteenth Century Public Sphere

Over the course of the eighteenth century, England witnessed the rise of what J�rgen Habermas termed the "bourgeois public sphere," an inclusive, discursive domain in which individuals gathered to discuss social and political issues of mutual interest. This public sphere was epitomized by commercial spaces such as coffeehouses, in which educated men exchanged ideas, read pamphlets, and attended lectures, political debates, and scientific demonstrations. The eighteenth-century public sphere was enabled by new forms of print culture including periodicals, newspapers, printmaking, and the sentimental novel. This course traces the emergence of this new form of intellectual and sociable community by examining literary and visual texts by Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, Samuel Richardson, William Hogarth, Joseph Highmore, and others. It also considers the gendered limitations of Habermas's conception of the public sphere by exploring the literary, sociable, and political activities of eighteenth-century authors, scholars, hostesses and celebrities including Eliza Haywood, Elizabeth Montagu, Sarah Scott, the Ladies of Llangollen, and the Duchess of Devonshire. Meets with LIT-437 001.

LIT-637
001
LITERATURE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth Century Literature (3)

Scandal and Celebrity

Many social phenomena often viewed as distinctively contemporary flourished in Britain during the eighteenth century, including the profusion of consumer goods; the expansion of print culture and public commentary; and widespread public fascination with public individuals, fame, and scandal. This course examines the way in which the private lives of both literary characters and historical figures in this period were transformed into saleable commodities that were eagerly consumed by the reading public. In so doing, students explore the transition from narratives extolling "celebrated" public individuals to the emergence of the modern cult of celebrity, as well as the increasingly porous boundary between celebrity and notoriety. Figures and texts considered include the famed courtesan and author, Kitty Fisher; political hostess and 'woman of fashion,' the Duchess of Devonshire; celebrity 'recluses,' the Ladies of Llangollen; poet Lord Byron; novelist Caroline Lamb; naval hero, Lord Horatio Nelson; and the author and former slave, Mary Prince. Meets with LIT-437 001.