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LITERATURE

LIT-643
Advanced Studies in Twentieth Century Literature (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics include modernist fiction and poetry, the Harlem Renaissance, postmodernism, counterculture, experimental poetry, with emphasis on research. Meets with LIT-443.

LIT-643
001
LITERATURE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in Twentieth Century Literature (3)

Modern Drama and the Politics of Emotion

Modern drama since Ibsen has split between those playwrights who rejected the bourgeois content of the "well made play" in favor of transgressive social issues, and those playwrights who rejected traditional form in favor of experimentations in staging and genre. Common to both strategies, however, was a repression of the emotional capacity of the drama-its embodied ability to stage and elicit affect-in order to achieve modernist abstraction and political agendas. This course surveys a range of modern plays in examining these politics of emotion-of the fault lines between more popular dramatists working in traditional forms and those committed to the avant-garde. Readings include works by dramatists such as Ibsen, Strindberg, Shaw, Coward, Rattigan, Beckett, Cocteau, Ionesco, Pinter, and Kane, as well as theories of emotion and affect. Meets with LIT-443 001.

LIT-643
002
LITERATURE
FALL 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Advanced Studies in Twentieth Century Literature (3)

All That Jazz

This course explores the complicated evolution of the jazz-blues tradition in African American literature from Langston Hughes to Toni Morrison to contemporary spoken-word poetries. The course examines the ways in which the literary writers derived notions of formal innovation, ethnic self-definition, liberating sexuality, and an ideal of artistic integrity from the music. The course also examines the critical problems of cultural performance and racial authenticity that have emerged from this tradition, from the complicated relationship between literature and music, to the often problematic discourses of authenticity, to theories of cultural performance that attend the celebration of the music as muse. Meets with LIT-443 002.