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LITERATURE

LIT-733
Special Topics in Literature (3)

Course Level: Graduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Focuses on thematic and theoretical approaches to literature that traverse historical periods and national boundaries. Offered irregularly.

LIT-733
001
LITERATURE
FALL 2014

Course Level: Graduate

Special Topics in Literature (3)

The Practice of Diaspora

The study of African American literature and culture has benefited greatly from pursuing intellectual inquiry across national borders, defining blackness in fruitfully complicated ways by following the multidirectional physical and cultural dispersal of Africans throughout the so-called New World. This course takes up and interrogates this scholarly practice of diaspora by focusing on the themes of migration, memory, and absence within diaspora theory, exploring those key terms as they inform and are informed by readings of innovative literary texts by authors from the United States, West Africa, and the Caribbean. The class takes measure of both the productive claims and the complicating pitfalls of these theories of social and cultural movement and uses them to understand the literary and cultural practices of writers of African descent as they cross the Atlantic and the Caribbean to the U.S. metropolis (and back again).

LIT-733
001
LITERATURE
SPRING 2015

Course Level: Graduate

Special Topics in Literature (3)

Global Mobilities

This course examines what it means to be a "global" subject and to what extent global is defined and determined not only by movement, flow, and circulation, but also by various types of immobility. Students examine meta-narratives about the world and also discuss the effects that global (im)mobilites have on subject formation, aesthetics, and structures of feeling. Students draw their readings primarily from two different fields of academic inquiry: postcolonial theory and globalization studies. The theoretical readings are supplemented by films including the Dardenne brother's La Promesse and novels by authors such as Patrice Chamoiseau and Mohsin Hamid.