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PHILOSOPHY

PHIL-485
Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Course Level: Undergraduate

Topics vary by section, may be repeated for credit with different topic. Rotating topics including medical ethics, philosophy of language, advanced philosophical argumentation, philosophy of reason and passion, bio-ethics, and post-modernism. Usually meets with PHIL-685. Usually offered every term. Prerequisite: PHIL-105 or permission of instructor.

PHIL-485
001
PHILOSOPHY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Existentialism

This course focuses on nineteenth and twentieth century existentialism, with a particular emphasis on the role of imagination in creating one's identity. The class reads philosophical works by Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Heidegger, and de Beauvoir, as well as literary works by Camus, Dostoyevsky and also Sartre. Meets with PHIL-685 001.

PHIL-485
002
PHILOSOPHY
FALL 2015

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Philosophies of Action

In a deontological world, with no transcendental or natural laws ordering human practices, the following questions are asked: how are we to act, collectively and individually; How do we hold ourselves and others responsible for our actions; and on what basis do we evaluate competing claims for our resources, loyalty and participation. These questions are addressed by working through texts by Machiavelli, M. Weber, Arendt, Foucault, Ranciere and others. Meets with PHIL-685 001.

PHIL-485
001
PHILOSOPHY
SPRING 2016

Course Level: Undergraduate

Selected Topics in Philosophy (3)

Derrida and Buddhism

Derridean deconstruction is arguably one of the most influential continental philosophies of the late 20th century. The class examines major works by Jacques Derrida, compares Derridean deconstruction with Buddhist philosophy, and considers the influence of the deconstructive mode of thinking in our understanding of identity, ethics and politics. Meets with PHIL-685 001.